A Corpse In The Well Summary Notes

A Corpse In The Well Author

Shankar Ramachandra Kharat (1921-2001) was a Marathi writer and an associate of Dr.B.R. Ambedkar. His writings mainly dealt with the plight of Dalits, their life and experiences. He wrote on the theme of oppression. He had served as the Vice-Chancellor of Marathwada University and later as a Member of the Maharashtra Legislative Council. He converted to Buddhism at a later stage in his life.

A Corpse In The Well Summary

‘A Corpse in the Well’ is an extract from the book ‘Taral – Antaral’ an autobiography of Shankar Ramachandra Kharat, a Marathi Dalit writer and an associate of Dr. B.R. Ambedkar. The story is translated from Marathi into English by Priya Adarkar.

The theme of the story is injustice and oppression. The story recounts the inhuman treatment of the Mahars (a Dalit community of Maharashtra, who worked as laborers or provided security to villages and towns). The story is set in a village named Kamat, where the narrator and his father lived. Mahar’s duty in the village is as dangerous as a noose around his neck.

The narrator recalls an incident he and his father experienced in his boyhood days which sends shivers down his body even to this day. The narrator had come to his village for the summer holidays.

That day it was their turn to do the customary duty at the village. A corpse was found floating in an abandoned well. As per tradition the narrator’s father (Anna) and a Ramoshi (another Dalit community)were summoned to guard the corpse during the night. As expected the narrator’s father and his friend had to be on guard duty until the police arrived, the next day. The police did not come, even by late afternoon. So the narrator’s mother sent a basket of Bhakri (roti) with him for his father. The father who is devoted to duty refused to eat until after the police arrived and completed the inquest. The narrator is pained and asks his father why he had to stay hungry while the police were happily filling their bellies at the village chief’s house. His father explains that the police were officers and they can’t work without food. When the narrator questions his father why only he should work on an empty stomach, his father replies ‘That’s what village duty is, my boy! Who cares if a Mahar lives or dies’.

When the narrator offers to stand guard instead of his father until he has had his meal, the father gets angry. He doesn’t want his son to take up ‘village duty’ because once he gets involved in it. his life is doomed forever, he asks his son to go home. At that time two constables followed by the head constable on a horse, arrive at the well. The narrator’s father gets up and bows deeply before the head constable. The father and the Ramoshi made arrangements to feed and provide water for the horse.

The head constable inspected the well. The narrator describes the dilapidated well which had collapsed into ruins. The well was deep and green moss and leaves floated in the unused water. The steps leading to the water inside the well had slipped into disarray and it was dangerous to use them. It was a daunting task to remove a corpse from such a well. The policemen discussed the matter with the village chief. The constable then ordered the narrator’s father to get into the well and bring the corpse up.

The narrator protested with the constable that a Mahar’s village duty was to only guard the corpse and not touch it as it would offend the children of the dead man. The father explained to the constable that the heirs of the corpse will bear a grudge against the Mahars if he touched the corpse. The head constable ordered Anna to get into the well and threatened to whip him if he did not. But Anna stood there silently. The police started to abuse Anna in foul language.

The narrator was shocked at the policemen’s behavior and the injustice meted out his father. The author felt that his father had not done anything wrong and the only crime that he had done was being born a Mahar. The narrator became angry and argued with the police that there was no reason to abuse his father because the relatives of the corpse would come and retrieve the body from the well. He questioned the police for threatening his father just because he was a Mahar on village duty. The head constable was infuriated by the narrator’s angry words and asked the constable to catch hold of him so that he could give him a sound beating. When the constable, rushed at the narrator with his baton raised, his father held him protectively and asked the narrator to calm down. He advised the narrator that he was old enough to understand everything and he (father) would take responsibility for the consequences.

Since there was no way out of the situation the narrator’s lather, undressed, and started getting down the well with the help of a rope while the narrator stood at the edge of the well watching his father with anxiety when he suddenly spied a snake moving towards the corpse. The narrator was horrified at the sight of the snake and warned his father to vary the snake. The snake was alarmed by the noise of the narrator’s shouting and retreated into a hole and lay halfway, peeping curiously, out of the hole. The narrator’s father dangled from the rope, afraid to get into the water. The village chief and the policemen urged the narrator’s father to get into the water quickly because they thought that the snake was not poisonous. The narrator pleaded with his father to come up from the well, and let him take his place because if anything happen to the father, their family will be greatly affected by the consequence.

The narrator’s father looked up to his son in despair and said that he was ready to be a martyr in the line of village duty- ‘Let the village know that Mahar Rama (we now come to know that the narrator’s father’s name is Rama) died of snakebite, died while removing a corpse from a ruined well while he was supposed to be doing his village duty. Let the village know! Let the government know! Let the whole world know!

Then without thinking of his own safety, the narrator’s father gets into the water and quickly tied the corpse to the rope, and it was pulled up by the others. All the while when Anna was in the water he had kept a vigilant eye on the snake in fear and as soon as the rope was lowered down again he quickly grabbed it and was pulled out of the well safely.

Thus the threat to the narrator’s father’s life had passed. The narrator’s eyes filled with relief. His father embraced him and consoled him. Later the bloated dead body was taken in a cart, for post¬mortem. to a doctor about eight miles from their village. The narrator’s father and two Ramoshi’s accompanied the police to the hospital.

The narrator felt numbed by the incident. He was perturbed as he thought of the dangers a Mahar had to face on village duty. He started questioning himself that in spite of all the dangers, in-human treatment, and oppression the Mahars faced, the Mahars had been fighting ‘a case in the High Court for their right of ‘ Vatan’ share – a quarter of the share. When the author himself became an advocate, he realized that the Mahars had followed the litigation right up to the high court for their share of hereditary right – which seemed a worthless right – to the author.

A Corpse In The Well Glossary

Mahar         : Community of people living in Maharashtra. They worked as agricultural laborers and gave security to villages and towns. They were treated as untouchables.
Ramoshi     : Another community in Maharashtra that fought battles, and is known for its bravery.
Bloated      : swollen
Noose       : adjustable loop of rope
Bounding  : leaping jumping
Inquest     : a formal investigation
Trough     : a container
Sheaf       : a quantity of shoots/bundle of shoots

A Corpse In The Well Questions & Answers

Comprehension

Question 1.
What was the occupation of the narrator’s father?
Answer:
The occupation of the narrator’s father was village duty.

Question 2.
The ‘well’ mentioned in the story was frequently used by the villagers.(True/false)
Answer:
False

Question 3.
Who kept guard at the well?
Answer:
The narrator’s father, Rama, and another Ramoshi kept guard at the well.

Question 4.
Who was supposed to conduct an initial inquiry about the corpse?
Answer:
A head constable and another constable were expected from the police post, to conduct an initial inquiry about the corpse.

Question 5.
Why did Anna refuse to eat bhakri?
Answer:
The narrator’s father refused to eat bhakri because he was on village duty and one who is on village duty is expected to not eat. on duty. The narrator’s father’s duty would be over only after the police had conducted the initial inquiry, until then he could not eat anything, while on duty.

Question 6.
The Head Constabel came riding on
a. ahorse
b. a bike
c. a bicycle
Answer:
a – a horse

Question 7.
The Constable yelled at Anna. Why?
Answer:
The constable yelled at Anna because he refused to get into the well to bring up the corpse. The narrator’s family belonged to the Mahar community of Maharashtra and were considered untouchables. And hence it was inauspicious for the narrator’s father to touch the corpse of other communities. If he did so, they would bear a grudge against his father and excommunicate him from the village.

Question 8.
What made Anna feel apprehensive about touching the corpse?
Answer:
Anna was apprehensive to touch the corpse because the narrator’s family belonged to the Mahar community of Maharashtra and were considered untouchables. And hence it was inauspicious for the narrator’s father to touch the corpse of other communities. If he did so, they would bear a grudge against his father and excommunicate him from the village.

Question 9.
How did the narrator feel when he saw Anna getting cursed and abused?
Answer:
The narrator felt that if Anna said one word if he said no, the constable wouldn’t stop till he had drubbed him soundly. He felt that his father had kept quiet because he was afraid of being beaten up by the police. In those days the oppressive power and prestige of the head constable were tremendous, against which a Mahar was a mere wisp of straw. Seeing and hearing all the abuses hurled by the police, the narrator was shocked. He felt that it was rank injustice for his father to be abused for refusing to remove someone else’s body from somebody else’s well. He felt that it was a crime to be born a Mahar in the village.

Question 10.
Why did the boy scream when he saw his father slide down the rope?
Answer:
The boy screamed because he saw a snake slithering in the water in the well, towards the corpse.

Question 11.
According to the narrator, what was the lesson behind the Mahars’ long-drawn struggle involved in Milage duty?
Answer:
The lesson behind the Mahar’s long-drawn struggle involved in village duty was their sense of duty – consciousness. The Mahars deemed that it is their ‘hereditary right’ to be on village duty but the author felt that it was a ‘worthless right’.

Question 12.
The village duty for the Mahars was dreadful and disrespectful Explain.
Answer:
The village duty of the Mahars was full of danger. It was a perpetual noose around the neck of a Mahar. When a corpse was found floating in an abandoned well the narrator’s father and another Ramoshi, were deputed to guard the well at night. They stayed up all night, guarding the corpse. They were expected to stay on duty until the police arrived to conduct an initial inquiry of the corpse. The Mahar’s had a tradition of not having food while on duty. The narrator’s father had to stay hungry even until the next day’s evening waiting for the police to arrive.

The police ordered the narrator’s father to get into the well and fetch the coipse. The well was unused for many years. The steps leading into the well had fallen apart. The water in the well was unhygienic due to disuse and stagnation. The corpse was bloated and foul-smelling. In spite of all this, the constable urged . Anna to go into the well. Anna refused to touch the coipse because it would create communal tension in the village. The police lose their temper and threaten and abuse Anna. Anna reluctantly agrees to get into the well fearing the wrath of the police. A snake in the well’s shallow water causes a fright in both the son and the father. Anna risks his life in the name of village duty and eventually brings the corpse out of the well safely.

Question 13.
Describe the atmosphere near the well, as the narrator arrives.
Answer:
The narrator arrived at the well in the afternoon. His father was sitting close to the well. The chief constable and the Assistant constable were yet to arrive. The narrator offered the Bakri sent by his mother to his father and urged him to eat. But Anna refused, because it was improper to have food while on village duty. The village chief was sitting under the shadow of a distant tree. The narrator is pained and asks his father why he had to stay hungry while the police were happily filling their bellies at the village chief’s house.

His father explains that the police were officers and they can’t work without food. When the narrator questions his father why only he should work on an empty stomach his father replies “That’s what village duty is, my boy! who care sif a Mahar lives or dies’”. When the narrator offers to stand guard instead of his father until he has had his meal, the father gets angry. He doesn’t want his son to take up ‘village duty’ because once he gets involed in it his life is doomed forever. He asks his son to go home.

At that time two constable followed by the head constable on a horse arrive at the well. The narrator’s father gets up and bows deeply before the head constable. The father and the Ramoshi made arrangements to feed and water the head constable’s horse.

Question 14.
How does the story bring out the disrespectful attitude towards Mahars in Society?
Answer:
The story ‘A Corpse in the well’ depicts the theme of injustice and disrespect towards Mahars in society. The Mahars loyally and wholeheartedly serve the village. They have a keen sense of duty. The narrator’s father refuses to have food while on duty. He guards the corpse in the well until the police arrive for the initial inquiry. They even make arrangements for feeding and watering the head constable’s horse. But their loyalty and duty – consciousness is totally disregarded when the constable abuses Anna and even threatens to whip him when he refuses to get into the well to bring up the corpse, fearing communal tensions in the village if he touches the corpse.

When the narrator spies a snake near the corpse he warns Anna not to get down into the water, and come up, fearing for his life. But the village chief and the policemen urge Anna to get into the water quickly because they thought that the snake was not poisonous but only a reptile. They disregard the safety of his life. Even after Anna brings the corpse out of the well, he could not have food. His duty would be over only after he safely delivers the corpse to the dispensary, eight miles away, for the post mortem. Until then he had to stay hungry.

Question 15.
A Corpse in the Well’demonstrates the unjust practices of Indian Society and the humiliation of Mahars. Expand this statement based on your reading of the lesson.
Answer:
In the story ‘A Corpse in the well’, the duty of guarding a village was entrusted to the Mahars (untouchables). The narrator’s father, a Mahar, had to guard a corpse floating in an abandoned well for a night and whole day without food. When Anna refused to get into the well to bring up the coipse, fearing communal tension in the village, the police threaten to whip him if he refused to bring up the corpse and humiliate him by abusing him as “You lump of dirt! Are you going to jump; or do I have to whip you”.

The corpse was bloated and smelled foul but Anna had to get down into the purtrid water of the well, in spite of the threat of being bitten by a snake in the well, and had to bring up the corpse.

Question 16.
Write a note on the characters in the story with reference to their background and attitude.
Answer:
The main characters in the story ‘A Coipse in the Well’ are The narrator, his father, police constable and Head constable. The narrator of the story is the autor Shankar Ramachadra Khar at. He belonged to the Mahar community of Maharashtra. He has come to his village for summer vacation, and so it implies he was getting educated in some place away from his \illage. Although the narrator was young he was brave enough to protest against the injustice meted out by the police to his father. The narrator was aware of his ‘rights’ even at a very young age. He loved his father very much and was very concerned when he went hungry for two whole days. He feared for his father’s life when he spied a snake in the well.

He was shocked at the oppressive power of the police when they abused and threatened to whip his father. He says that he was old enough to understand the rank injustice meted to his father. He was enraged when the police abused his father and protest their injustice by asking them if they were threatening his father just because he was a Mahar on the village duty’. He was compassionate enough to offer to take his father’s place in the well fearing that it would bite him because he felt that if anything happened to his father, their family would be ruined. The narrator later studied to be an advocate. He had often pondered why Mahars do the kind of work they did and only realized it after he became an advocate. He understood that ‘village duty’ was their hereditary right.

ANNA:

The narrator’s father was loyal to his ‘village duty’, in spite of all the injustice meted him in. the line of duty as a Mahar, He followed the rules of his duty consciously. Even though he stayed hungry while guarding the corpse, he and the other Ramoshi made arrangements to feed and water the head constable’s horse. Fie had great respect for authority. This can be implied when he says ‘Oh, they are officers! How can they work without food?’. When his son asks him why only he should work on an empty stomach, he brushes off the question by saying ‘That’s what village duty, my hoy! Who cares if a Mahar lives or dies?”. This shows that he had understood the perils of his duty quite well. It can be understood that Anna doesn’t want his children to take up the traditional work of a Mahar. When the narrator offers to take his place to guard the corpse while injustice is meted out by the police to his father.

The narrator was aware of his ‘rights’ even at a very young age. He loved his father very much and was very concerned when he went hungry for two whole days. He feared for his father’s life when he spied a snake in the well. He was shocked at the oppressive power of the police when they abused and threatened to whip his father. He says that he was old enough to understand the rank injustice meted to his father. He was enraged when the police abused his father and protest their injustice by asking them if they were threatening his father just because he was a Mahar on the village duty’. He was compassionate enough to offer to take his father’s place in the well fearing that it would bite him because he felt that if anything happened to his father, their family would be ruined. The narrator later studied to be an advocate. He had often pondered why Mahars do the kind of work they did and only realized it after he became an advocate. He understood that ‘village duty’ was their hereditary’ right.

ANNA:

The narrator’s father was loyal to his ‘village duty’, in spite of all the injustice meted him in the line of duty as a Mahar. He followed the rules of his duty consciously. Even though he stayed hungry’ while guarding the corpse, he and the other Ramoshi made arrangements to feed and water the head constable’s horse. He had great respect for authority. Tins can be implied when he says ‘Oh, they are officers! How can they work without food?’. Wlien his son asks him why only he should work on an empty stomach, he brushes off the question by saying ‘That’s what village duty, my boy! Who cares if a Mahar lives or dies?”. This shows that he had understood the perils of his duty quite well. It can be understood that Anna doesn’t want his children to take up the traditional work of a Mahar.

When the narrator offers to take his place to guard the corpse while convincing his father to have food, his father vehemently says ‘No! No village duty for you. It’s bad enough that we have to endure it: Once you’re saddled with the village duty, you will be stuck with it for life! That’s our doom”. Anna wants his son to be educated and lead a decent life. Anna understood that there would be communal tension in the village if he touched the corpse by fearing the apathy of the police he reluctantly goes down the well, disregarding the threat to his life by a snake near the corpse and brings it up safely.

THE POLICE HEAD CONSTABLE:

The police Head constable makes a blatant display of his authority. The head constable comes pounding on his horse. He twirls his baton and strolls around the well to inspect the corpse and the well. When he understands the difficulty in bringing up the corpse from the disused and dilapidated well, he consults the village chief and then orders Anna to jump into the well to bring up the corpse. When Anna refuses, he abuses him and threatens to whip him. He disregards Anna’s Concern, that touching the corpse would create communal tensions in the village, and orders him to bring up the Corpse, the head constable abuses Anna by saying ‘You lump of dirt! Are you going to jump; or do I have to whip you. This shows his total disregard and the unjust way he treats another human being.

When Anna reluctantly gets into the well, his son spies a snake near the corpse and pleads for him to come out of the well. The head constable orders Anna to be quick as it was getting late. This shows his apathy for the life of another human being.

Question 17.
How does the story bring out the humiliation meted out to the Mahars?
Answer:
‘A Corpse in the Well’ is an extract from the book ‘Taral – Antaral’ an autobiography of Shankar RamacHndra Kharat, a Marathi Dalit writer and an associate of Dr. B.R. Ambedkar. The story is translated from Marathi into English by Priya Adarkar.

The theme of the story is injustice and oppression. The story recounts the inhuman treatment of the Mahars (a Dalit community of Maharashtra, who worked as laborers or provided security to villages and towns). The story is set in a village named Kamat, where the narrator and his father lived. A Mahar’s duty in the village is as dangerous as a noose around his neck. The narrator recalls an incident he and his father experienced in his boyhood days which sends shivers down his body even to this day. The narrator had come to his village for the summer holidays.

That day it was their turn to do the customary duty at the village. A corpse was found floating in an abandoned well. As per tradition the narrator’s father (Anna) and a Ramoshi (another Dalit community)were summoned to guard the corpse during the night.

As expected the narrator’s father and his friend had to be on guard duty until the police arrived, the next day. The police did not come, even by late afternoon. So the narrator’s mother sent a basket of Bhakri (roti) with him for his father. The lather who is devoted to duty refused to eat until after the police arrived and completed the inquest. The narrator is pained and asks his father why he had to stay hungry while the police were happily filling their bellies at the village chief’s house. His father explains that the police were officers and they can’t work without food. When the narrator questions his father why only he should work on an empty stomach, his father replies ‘That’s what village duty is, my boy! Who cares if a Mahar lives or dies’.

When the narrator offers to stand guard instead of his father until he has had his meal, the father gets angry. He doesn’t want his son to take up ‘village duty’ because once he gets involved in it, his life is doomed forever, he asks his son to go home. At that time two constables followed by the head constable on a horse, arrive at the well. The narrator’s father gets up and bows deeply before the head constable.

The father and the Ramoshi made arrangements to feed and provide water for the horse. The head constable inspected the well. The narrator describes the dilapidated well which had collapsed into ruins. The well was deep and green moss and leaves floated in the unused water. The steps leading to the water inside the well had slipped into disarray and it was dangerous to use them. It was a daunting task to remove a corpse from such a well. The policemen discussed the matter with the village chief. The constable then ordered the narrator’s father to get into the well and bring the corpse up.

The narrator protested with the constable that a Mahar’s village duty was to only guard the corpse and not touch it as it would offend the children of the dead man. The father explained to the constable that the heirs of the corpse will bear a grudge against the Mahars if he touched the corpse. The head constable ordered Anna to get into the well and threatened to whip him if he did not. But Anna stood their silently. The police started to abuse Anna in foul language.

The narrator was shocked at the policemen’s behavior and the injustice meted out his father. The author felt that his father had not done anything wrong and the only crime that he had done was being born a Mahar. The narrator became angry and argued with the police that there was no reason to abuse his father because the relative of the corpse would come and retrieve the body from the well He questioned the police for threatening his lather just because he was a Mahar in the village duty. The head constable was infuriated by the narrator’s angry words and asked the constable to catch hold of him so that he could give him a sound beating. When the constable, rushed at the narrator with his baton raised, his father held him protectively and asked the narrator to calm down. He advised the narrator that he was old enough to understand everything and he (father) would take responsibility of the consequences.

Since there was no way out of the situation the narrator’s father, undressed, and started getting down the well with the help of a rope while the narrator stood at the edge of the well watching his father with anxiety when he suddenly spied a snake moving towards the corpse. The narrator was horrified at the sight of the snake and warned his father to vary of the snake. The snake was alarmed by the noise of the narrator’s shouting and retreated into a hole and lay halfway, peeping curiously, out of the hole. The narrator’s father dangled from the rope, afraid to get into the water. The village chief and the policemen urged the narrator’s father to get into the water quickly because they thought that the snake was not poisonous. The narrator pleaded his father to come up from the well, and let him take his place because if anything happed to the father, their family will be greatly affected by the consequence.

The narrator’s father looked up to his son in despair and said that he was ready to be a martyr in the line of village duty- ‘Let the village know that Mahar Rama (we now come to know that the narrator’s father’s name is Rama) died of snakebite, died while removing a corpse from a ruined well while he was supposed to be doing his village duty. Let the village know! Let the government know! Let the whole world know! Then without thinking of his own safety, the narrator’s father gets into the water and quickly tied the corpse to the rope, and it •was pulled up by the others. All the while when Anna was in the water he had kept a vigilant eye on the snake in fear and as soon as the rope was lowered down again he quickly grabbed it and was pulled out of the well safely.

Thus the threat to the narrator’s father’s life had passed. The narrator’s eyes filled with relief. His father embraced him and consoled him.Later the bloated dead body was taken in a cart, for postmortem, to a doctor about eight miles from their village. The narrator’s father and two Ramoshi’s accompanied the police to the hospital.

The narrator felt numbed by the incident. He was perturbed as he thought of the dangers a Mahar had to face on village duty. He started questioning himself that in spite of all the dangers, in-human treatment and oppression the Mahars faced, the Mahars had been fighting ‘a case in the High Court for their right of ‘ Vatan’ share’ – a quarter of the share.

When the author himself became an advocate, he realized that the Mahars had followed the litigation right up to the high court for their share of hereditary right – which seemed a worthless right – to the author.

Question 18.
The writer has juxtaposed the complex nature of Mahar struggle in Indian society and the new awakening among the upcoming generation of Mahars. Eplain with reference to the story.
Answer:
The story ‘A Corpse in the well’ depicts the theme of injustice and disrespect towards Mahars in the society. The Mahars loyally and whole heartedly serve the village. They have a keen sense of duty. The narrator’s father refuses to have food while on duty. He guards the corpse in the well until the police arrive for the intitial enquiry. They even make arrangements for feeding and watering, the head constable’s horse. But their loyalty and duty – consciousness is totally disregarded when the constable abuses Anna and even threatens to whip him when he refuses to get into the well to bring up the corpse, fearing communal tensions in the village ifhe touches the corpse.

When the narrator spies a snake near the corpse he warns Anna not to get down into the water, and come up, fearing for his life. But the village chief and the policemen urge Anna to get into the water quickly because they thought that the snake was not poisonous but only a repitle. They disregard the safety of his life.
Even after Anna brings the corpse out of the well, he could not have food. His duty would be over only after he safety delivers the corpse to the dispensary, eight miles away, for the post mortem. Untill then he had to stay hungry.

The narrator of the story is the autor Shankar Ramachadra Kharat. He belonged to the Mahar community of Maharashtra. He has come to his village for summer vacation, and so it implies he was getting educated in some place away from his village. Although the narrator was young he was brave enough to protest against the injustice meted out by the police to his father. The narrator was aware of his rights’ even at a very young age. He ioved his father very much and was very concerned when he went hungry for two whole days. He feared for his father’s life when he spied a snake in the well. He was shocked at the oppressive power of the police when they abused and threatned to whip his father. He says that he was old enough to understand the rank injustice meted to his father.

He was enraged when the police abused his father and protests their injustice by asking them if they were threatening his father just because he was a Mahar on the village duty. He was compassionate enough to offer to take his father’s place in the well fearing that it would bite him because he felt that if anything happened to his father, their family would be ruined. The narrator later studied to be an advocate. He had often pondered why Mahars do the kind of work they did and only realized it after he became an advocate. He understood that ‘village duty’ was their hereditary right.

LANGUAGE ACTIVITY

LETTER WRITING

Task exercises:

Question 1.
Write a letter to the Editor of Daily News about the growing incidents of crime and their repercussions on the general public.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Date : ___/____/_____

From
XXX
YYY
To
The Editor
Daily News
……………………
……………………
Dear sir,
Sub: Increasing incidents of crime in our locality
I am a concerned citizen of BHELColony. I write to your esteemed newspaper to express my deep concern over the increasing incidents of crime in our locality which has brought untold suffering to the residents of this colony.

We have approached the local corporator and the jurisdictional police a number of times and submitted written complaints, only to be ignored. In order to highlight the gravity of the situation, I see no other way for a solution except through your columns. ‘

As it is, our colony lies on the outskirts of the city. The safety of our life and property has been greatly threatened by the increasing incidents of thefts, chain snatching, purse snatching, mobile snatching, eve-teasing, robbery, assault, and eve-teasing. All this has given rise to an atmosphere of fear and insecurity in our locality. No resident dares to go out after dark.

I am hopeful that you will help in bringing normalcy to our locality by publishing this letter in your esteemed newspaper.
Thanking you,

Yours truly
Residents of BHEL colony

Question 2.
Write a letter to the Principal of your college asking for a reference letter to be submitted to your new employer, you can use the following hints.

  • Introduce yourself as the alumnus of the college
  • Mention your year and course of study
  • Why do you need the reference letter

LETTER TO THE PRINCIPAL

Date : ___/____/_____

From
Nagaraj
YYY
To
The Principal
New Cambridge College
XXX
YYY
Respected*sir,
Sub : Request for a job reference letter
I am Nagaraj an alumnus of New Cambridge College. I have successfully completed my Bachelor of Science (PCMB) in the college in the year 2017 – 18.
I have been inducted by Ms. Zinka labs as a lab technician and they have asked me to provide a letter of reference from the college to analyze my character and conduct. I request you to provide me a letter of reference, so that I may embark on my career and pursue my dreams. I would be glad to collect the letter of reference, In-person, as soon as I am informed it is ready. My contact number is xxxxxxxxxx.
Thanking you,

Yours faithfully
Nagaraj

Question 3.
You want to avoid internet banking from the nearest bank. They had sent a secret PIN to your address. Somehow you lost the PIN. Write a request letter to the Bank Manager asking for a PIN.

  • A formal request for PIN
  • How you lost the PIN
  • Address proof is attached with the letter.

LETTER TO AVAIL INTERNET BANKING

Date :___/____/_____

From
Nagaraj
XXX
YYY
To
The Manager
Vijaya Bank
Rajajinagar
Bangalore-10
Dear Sir/ Madam,
Sub : Request for NEW IPIN NUMBER

I have a savings account bearing number xxxxxxxxxxx in your bank’s Rajajinagar branch. I have net banking facility available for my account. But unfortunately, I am unable to use the net banking facility for the past week as I have forgotten the password. I am only able to recall the username.
I, therefore, kindly request you to reset the IP EM and mail the new IPIN to my mailing address nagarajbl234@gmail.com.

I have provided the details of my account which may prove helpful for the purpose.
Full Name : Nagaraj. b
Account No: xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Customer ID : yyyyyyyyyyyyy
Mailing Address : xxxxxxxxx
Mb No: xxxxxxxxxx
E mail ID : nagarajb1234@gmail.com

I kindly request you to please process my application at the earliest. The applicable charges may be kindly debited from my account.
Thanking you,

Yours Faithfully
xxx

Question 4.
Your Internal Assessment Marks are missing in the Consolidated Marks Card issued by the University, Write a letter to the Register (Evaluation) for inclusion of marks and request for a rectified marks card. Use the following hints

  • Give details of your Register number and course
  • College Copy of Internal Assessment Marks awarded
  • Your previous marks card copies

From
Nagaraju. B
XXX
YYY
To
The Registrar
Bangalore University
Bangalore
Respected sir,
Sub: Request for inclusion of Internal Assessment Marks
ofVI semeseter B.Sc. (PCMB)
I am Nagaraju. B, a student from Cambridge College, Rajajinagar, Bengaluru – 10. Yesterday, we were issued the consolidated marks card for the year 2017 – 2018, and I was surprised that the Internal Assessment marks of VI semesters were missing. Therefore I request the Register to look into the matter and issue me the rectified marks card. The Academic Details are as follows:
Name Nagaraju. B
Fathers Name: XXX YYY
Name of college: Cambridge College, Bangalore -10.
registration : BBBxxxxxxxxxxxxx And Year of 2017-18
Study
Course B.Sc (PCMB) CBCS
I have attached a photocopy of the marks card for your scrutiny. I hope my earnest request is addressed at the earliest so that I may apply for a post-graduation degree, as the admissions have already started for the academic year.
Thanking you,

Yours faithfully
Nagaraju. B

Question 5.
Write a letter to the Assistant Engineer, BESCOM regarding irreguiarioad shedding and power cuts in your area, using the hints given.

  • Details of your address
  • Episodes of inconvenience due to power cuts
  • Your suggestions for the solution

LETTER TO ASSISTANT ENGINEER BESCOM

Date : / _ /

From
Sujoy
To
The Assistant Engineer
BESCOM
Rajajinagar Sub Division
Bengaluru -10.
Dear sir,
Sub: Inconvenience due to frequent power cuts
I would like to draw your kind attention through this letter on behalf of the citizens of Basaveshwaranagar Colony, that there’s frequent breakdown of electricity in Basaveshwaranagar, Colony, Rajajinagar, Bangalore -10.

The people of this locality have been suffering innumerable hardships due to frequent power cuts. Since the water supply is also connected to the supply of electricity, frequent power cuts have led to a shortage of water in the locality.

Students have been lagging behind in their studies due to long power shut-down during evenings and affecting their performance in examinations.

The heat of the summer has added to our woes in addition to the mosquito menance. People have been suffering sleepless nights due to power cuts as they can’t switch on fans, and mosquito repellents. Many people have fallen ill due to mosquito bites, which adds hospital bills to our monthly expenditures.

Moreover, miscreants are creating havoc during the nights, during power shut down. There have been many incidents of thefts, chain snatching and molestation in the darkness of powercut nights. Women and children are afraid to venture out at night. Old people have been robbed of their evening walks due to power cuts, as they prefer to stay indoors, rather than venture out on the dark streets at night fearing their safety.

Hence, I request your goodself to take appropriate measures to rectify and ensure proper power supply to our colony as early as possible to put us out of our hardships at the earliest.
Thanking you,

Your’s faithfully
Sujoy
(on behalf of residents of Basaveshwaranagar colony)

English Summary

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