A Service of Love Summary Notes

A Service of Love Author

O’ Henry is the pen name of William Sidney Porter who was an American writer, whose short stories are known for wit, wordplay, and clever twist endings. He wrote nearly 600 stories about life in America. He was born on September 11, 1862, in Greensboro, North Carolina.

He wrote mostly about ordinary people going about the daily adventure of living. Not infrequently, his stories involve coincidences or unexpected twists that result in surprise endings like that in ‘THE GIFT OF THE MAGL’ He cultivated his writing skills and became a professional writer. He became famous under his pseudonym, O’ Henry.

A Service of Love Summary

“A Service of Love” is one of the short stories written by American author O’ Henry. The short story is a great example of how love for each other inspires two lovers to sacrifice theirs. ambitions for the sake of each other. His stories are known for their wit, wordplay, characterization, and surprise endings.

O’ Henry begins the story with a premise (theory) that “WHEN ONE LOVES ONE’s ART NO SERVICE SEEMS TOO HARD”. O’ Henry bases this story on this premise to reach a decision by reasoning on the premise and at the same time, prove that the premise is wrong.

O’ Henry introduces the hero of the story Joe Larrabee. He is from a middle-class family from Mid-west California. He is an aspiring artist -pulsing with a genius for pictorial art. When Joe was six years old, he had drawn a picture of the town pump with a prominent (well-known) citizen passing it quickly. This was his first attempt at painting and it was now exhibited in a drug store (Pharmacy). Now, he was twenty years old. He has embarked to New York to study art.

Delia Caruthers is a gifted pianist. She is from a village in the south of New York. She had a good musical range of six – octaves Not many female singers have this kind of range. The six-octave range can be achieved by sopranos. Female Opera Singers. Her family and relatives pooled in their money to send her to an art school in New York. At this stage of the story O’ Henry keeps the reader in suspense, whether Delia goes on to be an accomplished pianist or not, nor do her relatives.

Joe and Delia meet at an atelier (workshop or studio used by artists). Many art and music students would gather in the atelier to talk about chiaroscuro (treatment of light and shade in drawing and painting), Wagner (German music composer Richard Wagner), Music, Rembrandt’s works (Rembrandt Harmenszoon VanRizn, was a Dutch draughtsman, painter, and printmaker), movies, Waldteufel (Emile, Waldteufel, French pianist) wall-paper, Chopin, (Fiyderk Franciszek Szopen, a polish music composer) and Oolong (traditional Chinese tea). They fall in love with each other and are married soon after because when one loves one’s Art no service seems too hard.

The newly married couple starts their married life in a lonesome tiny flat. The author compares the location of the flat to the ‘A sharp’ key of the piano which is way down to the far left end of the keyboard. They were happy, for they had their Art and they had each other.

Here the author wittily remarks that his advice to Joe Caruthers was to sell everything he has and give it to the doorkeeper of the apartment, for the privilege of living in a flat with his art and his love, Delia. Maybe the author implies that Art and Love cannot support the livelihood of the newly married couple.
Joe Caruthers enrolls in an expensive painting class of the famous Magister, a music scholar. Delia studies under Rosenstock, a famous pianist.

Joe’s ambition was to paint pictures that old, rich men would compete among themselves to have the privilege to acquir -s paintings. Delia dreamt of becomirig of much sought after orchesua pianist. She longs to achieve fame and that gives her liberty to decline to play with less famous orchestras and instead sit in a private dining – room of a famous restaurant eating lobster’s (a large edible shell fish).

The aspiring artist couple goes out to learn their chosen art after having a light breakfast everyday. They come back home and F<we long discussions about their hopes and aspirations, while having dinner, late in the night.

Everything was fine until they ran out of money. They found it difficult to pay for their art classes. The author ironically points out again ‘when one loves one’s art no service seems too hard’. So, Delia decides to give piano lessons to keep the fire in their hearth burning.

One day, Delia, comes home excited and tells Joe that she has found a pupil. She had been hired to teach piano to a girl named Clementina, the daughter of General A.B. Pinkney, a wealthy man who lived on the seventy first street. She explains Joe that the General had a splendid house, with a Byzantine front door. Clementina was wonderful girl of eighteen years with sweetest and simplest manners, Mid always dressed in white. Delia was to teach her for three days in a week for five dollars for each lesson. She assures Joe that when she gets two or more pupils, she can continue the classes with Herr Rosenstock.

Joe is distraught. He doesn’t want her to have to work and abandon her own piano lessons. He tells her that he would feel ashamed to let her struggle to earn money to put him through his art classes. He tries to convince Delia, that he could quit his art lessons and find some work, selling papers or laying cobble stones to bring in the money.

Delia vehemently disagrees with him and convinces him to let her give the piano classes. Joe reluctantly agrees. He hopes that he might be able to sell one ofhis paintings that hung in Tinkle’s window (AMagazine publishing company).

In the next week, the couple had an early breakfast. Each had their own reasons to leave home early. Joe told Delia that he was doing some morning effect sketches in central park. Delia left to teach piano to her pupil.

At the end of the week, Delia comes home and proudly places three five-dollar bills (notes) on the dining table that she had been paid for giving piano lessons for three days in the week. She seems to be tired and explains that Clementina doesn’t practice enough and she had to teach her the same thing often she talks about General Pinkney and wished that Joe would come to meet him, one day so that Joe could see the General’s splendid house.

Then, Joe takes out eighteen dollars from his pocket and lays them beside Delia’s earnings. He explains to her that he sold a water¬colour (painting) of the Obelisk, (a tall four-sided, narrow-tapering monument with a pyramid at the top) to a man from Peoria. Delia stares at the money in disbelief. She feels that Joe is joking. But I Joe convinces her that he had indeed sold the painting to the man from Peoria. He describes him as a fat man with a woolen muffler and a quill toothpick. The man had seen the painting displayed in Tinkle’s window and thought that it was a windmill. But he had bought it. He had even ordered an oil sketch of the Lackawanna freight depot. Joe feigns pride, telling Delia that not only her music lessons can earn money but his art is also in demand. They celebrate their success by dining on Oysters and Filet Mignon (a beef dish) that night.

The next Saturday, Joe came home earlier than Delia. He places eighteen dollars, on the table and washes his hands which were smeared with dark paint. Later, Delia comes home with bandages on her right hand. When Joe was curious to know what had happened, she explained that Clementina, her pupil, had insisted that she cook and share a Welsh rabbit dish with her and had spilled the boiling hot dish on her hands and wrist. The General had applied soothing balm on them and bound her hands with the bandages. She confesses that her hands hurt badly even then.

Joe appears suspicious. He takes her hand tenderly and pulls some white stands from beneath the bandages. As she had seen the money on the table and she asks him if he had sold another painting that day. Joe tells her that he had sold another painting to that fat man from Peoria. The gentleman had even ordered another painting of a parkscape with the Hudson river in the backdrop.

Suddenly he changes the topic and asks her at what time that afternoon had she burnt her hand. She replies, “Five O’ Clock. The iron -1 mean the rabbit came off the fire about that time”

Joe, asks her to sit down, and gently asks her what she had been doing for the last two weeks. She looks at Joe lovingly and stubbornly tries to defend herself but breaks down into tears and confesses that she had lied and had been working at a laundry on twenty-fourth Street.

She confides that she had Med to get any pupils to teach piano lessons and taken up the job. She had made up the fictitious story of teaching Clementina and about the Welsh rabbit. That afternoon, a girl in the laundry had unintentionally placed a hot iron on her hand. She begs, Joe not to be angry with her. She feared that Joe would abandon his art classes and take up a job instead. She theorizes that if she hadn’t got the work at the laundry, Joe might not have sold his paintings to the man from Peoria. Delia agrees that it didn’t matter to whomhe had sold the paintings and praises him that he was clever enough to sell the paintings. She asked him curiously how he began to suspect that she wasn’t giving music lessons.

Joe reveals that he wasn’t suspicious until that night. He confesses that he had also been working as a mechanic at the same laundry as she did, for the past two weeks. That afternoon at five O’clock he had sent cotton waste and oil from the engine room for a girl working’ upstairs, who had her hand burnt with a hot iron.

They forgive each other and laugh wholeheartedly at the absurdity of the situation. It is ironic how they both made up stories about how they got their money yet they were actually working at the same place.

Joe then remembered the premise “When one loves one’s Art, no service seems ————”. Delia cuts him midway saying, “No, Just when one loves…”. Their love for each other made them sacrifice their ambitions for the sake of each other. Hence we can conclude that love is greater than art and that the premise “When one loves one’s Art no service seems too hard” is wrong. We realize that ; “When one loves, no service seems too hard”.

A Service of Love Glossary

atelier                : (French) a workshop or studio esp. of an artist or a designer.
chiaroscuro       : the treatment of light and shade in drawing and painting.
enamor: inspire with love or liking, charm, delight.
janitor               : doorkeeper, caretaker of the building.
labrador            : (in full Labrador dog or retriever), a retriever of a breed With a black or golden coat often need as a gun dog or as a guide for a blind person)(Labrador, a large peninsula inN.E. Canada).
voluble              : speak/spoken vehemently, incessantly, or fluently.
chafing             : making or becoming sore or damaged by rubbing.
hustle               : push roughly, jostle.
philander         : flirt or have casual affairs with women, womanize.
cape                : overcoat, gown.
coddled          : treat as an invalid, protect attentively.
languid           : lacking vigor, idle, inert, apathetic.
Astrakhan       : a city in Russia.
portieres        : (French) a certain hang over a door or doorway.
filet mignon   : a small tender piece of beef from the end of the undercut.
escritoire        : writing table.
wainscot         : the paneled boards on the walls of an apartment.

A Service of Love Questions & Answers

Comprehension

Question 1.
Where did Joe and Delia meet for the first time? What was the decision taken by them at that moment?
Answer:
Joe and Delia meet in an atelier. They fell in love and married.

Question 2.
What is a feat in the story compared to?
A ‘feat’ in storytelling is compared to the Great Wall of China.

Question 3.
Why had the art and music students gathered in an atelier?
Answer:
The art and music students had gathered to discuss. Chiar-oscuro, Wagner, Music, Rembrandt’s works, pictures, Waldteufel, wallpaper, Chopin, and Oolong.

Question 4.
According to Delia Caruthers, what was the name of her first pupil? Whose daughter was she?
Answer:
According to Delia Caruthers, her first pupil was Clementina. She was supposed to be the daughter of General A.B. Pinkney.

Question 5.
At the end of the first week, how much did both Joe and Delia bring home respectively?
Answer:
At the end of the first week, Joe brought home eighteen dollars and Delia brought in fifteen dollars.

Question 6.
What stories did both of them fabricate about their jobs?
Answer:
Delia bed that she was giving piano lessons to a pupil named Clementina. Joe lied that he had sold one of his paintings that hung at Tinkles – a watercolor of the obelisk – to a man from Peoria.

Question 7.
Why was Delia not satisfied with Clementina?
Answer:
Deha was not satisfied with Clementina because she doesn’t practice enough. She had to teach her the same things often. Moreover, the girl always dressed entirely in white which she felt was boring.

Question 8.
What is the theme of the story “A Service of Love”?
Answer:
The theme of A service of love is love and sacrifice.

Question 9.
Joe and Delia went in search of a job, because
a. They had loved their work very much.
b. It was inevitable to work for their livelihood
c. There was no need of looking for a job, but just for a change, they thought of it.
Answer:
b. It was inevitable to work for their livelihood

Question 10.
Why did Joe refuse to send her to look for a job?
Answer:
Joe refused to send Delia to look for a job because he didn’t want to let her hustle for wages while he philandered in the regions of high art.

Question 11.
Under whom did Joe and Delia begin to train themselves? And what made them look for job?
Answer:
The Larabee couple rented a tiny lonesome flat in the outskirts of Newyork. Joe Larabee enrolls in an expensive painting class of the famous Magister, a music scholar. Delia studies piano under Rosenstock, a failed musician.

Joe’s ambition was to paint Pictures that old, rich men would complete among themselves to have the privilege to acquire one of his paintings. Delia dreamt of becoming a much sought-after or¬chestra pianist. She longs to achieve fame and fortune, which gives her the liberty to decline to play with less famous Orchestras and, instead sit in a private high-class dining room of a famous restaurant dining on Lobsters.

The aspiring artist couple; go out to leam their chosen art after having a light breakfast. They come back home and have long discussions about their hopes and aspirations, their art while having dinner late in the night.

Everything was fine until they ran out of money. They found it difficult to pay their art classes. So, Delia decides to give piano lessons to keep the fire in their hearth burning. She assures Joe that when she gets two or more pupils; she can continue the classes with Herr Rosenstock. She finds a pupil named Clementina, the daughter of General Pinkney.

Joe is distraught. He doesn’t want he to have to work and abandon her Piano classes. He tells her that her would feel ashamed to let her slave to earn money to put him through his art classes. He tries to convince Delia, that he could quit his art lessons and find some work, selling papers or laying cobblestones to bring in the money.

Delia vehemently disagrees with him and convinces him to let her give the Pianoo classes. Joe reluctantly agress. He hopes he might be able to sell one of his paintings that hung in Tinkle’s window.

Question 12.
How did Delia remonstrate for Joe’s refusal to send her to job?
Answer:
Joe Larabee enrolls in an expensive painting class of the fomous Magister, a music scholar. Deha studies Piano under Rosenstock, a failed Musician.

Joe’s ambition was to paint pictares that old, rich men would complete among themselves to have the privilege to accquire one of his paintings. Delia dreamt of becoming a much sought after or-chestra pianist. She longs to achieve fame and fortune, that gives her the liberty to decline to play with less famous Orchestraj and, instead sit in a private high – class dining room of a famous restourant dining on lobster’s.

The aspiring artist couple; go out to leam theft chosen art after having a hght breakfast. They came back home and have long dis-cussions about theft hopes and aspirations, theft art, while having dinner late in the night.

Everything was fine until they ran out of money. The found it difficult to pay theft art classes, so, Delia decides to give piano lessons to keep the fire in their hearth burning. She assures joe that when she gets two or more pupils; she can continue the classes with Herr Rosenstock. She finds a pupil named Clementina, the daughter of General Pinkney.

Joe is distraught. He doesn’t want her to have to work and abandon her place classes. He tells her that her would feel ashamed to let her slave to earn money to put him through his art classes. He tries to convince Delia, that he could quit his art lessons and find some work, selling papers or laying cobblestones to bring in the money.

Delia vehemently disagrees with him and convince him to let her give the piano classes. Joe reluctantly agress. He hopes he might be awe to sell one ofhis paintings that hung in Tinkle’s window.

Question 13.
In the first week of their job, how much did they earn? And how did they defend themselves fabricating stories about their job?
Answer:
The aspiring artist couple, Joe and Delia Caruthers, go out to learn their chosen art. Everything was fine until they ran out of money. They found it difficult to pay for their art classes. So Delia decides to give piano lessons to keep the fire in their hearth burning. One day, Delia, comes home excited and tells Joe that she has found a pupil. She had been hired to teach piano to a girl named Clementina, the daughter of General A.B. Pinkney, a wealthy man who lived on the seventy first street. She explains Joe that the General had a splendid house, with a Byzantine front door. Clementina was wonderful girl of eighteen years with sweetest and simplest manners, and always dressed in white. Delia was to teach her for three days in a week for five dollars for each lesson. She assures Joe that when she gets two or more pupils, she can continue he classes with Herr Rosenstock.

Joe is distraught. He doesn’t want her to have to work and abandon her own piano lessons. He tells her that he would feel ashamed to let her struggle to earn money to put him through his art classes. He tries to convince Delia, that he could quit his art lessons and find some work, selling papers or laying cobble stones to bring in the money.

Delia vehemently disagrees with him and convinces him to let her give the piano classes. Joe reluctantly agrees. He hopes that he might be able to sell one ofhis paintings that hung in Tinkle’s window (AMagazine publishing company).

In the next week, the couple had an early breakfast. Each had their own reasons to leave home early. Joe told Deha that he was doing some morning effect sketches in central park. Delia left to teach piano to her pupil.

At the end of the week, Delia’s comes home and proudly places three five dollar bills (notes) on the dining table that she had been paid for giving piano lessons for three days in the week. She seems to be tired and explains that Clementina doesn’t practice enough and she had to teach her the same thing often she talks about General Pinkney and wished that Joe would come to meet him, one day, so that Joe could see the General’s splendid house.

Then, Joe takes out eighteen dollars from his pocket and lays them beside Delia’s earnings. He explains her that he sold a water¬colour (painting) of the Obelisk, (a tall four sided, narrow – tapering monument with a pyramid at the top) to a man from Peoria. Delia stares at the money in disbelief. She feels that Joe is joking. But Joe convinces her that he had indeed sold the painting to the man from Peoria. He describes him as a fat man with a woollen muffler and a quill toothpick. The man had seen the painting displayed in Tinkle’s window and thought that it was a windmill. But he had bought it. He had even ordered an oil sketch ofthe Lackawanna freight depot. Joe feigns pride, telling Delia that not only her music lessons can earn money but his art is also in demand. They celebrate their success by dining on Oysters and Filet Mignon (a beef dish) that night.

Question 14.
Finally, how did Joe suspect about Delia’s job? Does she agree with Joe that she is not teaching and doing other kind of job? Explain.
Answer:
The next Saturday, Joe came home earlier than Delia. He places eighteen dollars, on the table and washes his hands which were smeared with dark paint. Later, Delia comes home with bandages on her right hand. When Joe was curious to know what had happened, she explained that Clementina, her pupil, had insisted that she cook and share a Welsh rabbit dish with her and had spilled the boiling hot dish on her hands and wrist. The General had applied soothing balm on them and bound her hands with the bandages. She confesses that her hands hurt badly even then.

Joe appears suspicious. He takes her hand tenderly and pulls some white strands from beneath the bandages. As she had seen the money on the table and asks him if had sold another painting that day. Joe tells her that he had sold another painting to that fat man from Peoria. The gentleman had even ordered another painting of a parkscape with the Hudson river in the backdrop.

Suddenly he changes the topic and asks her at what time that afternoon had she bupit her hand. She replies, “Five O’ Clock. The iron -1 mean the rabbit came off the fire about that time” Joe, asks her to sit down, and gently asks her what she had been doing for the last two weeks. She looks at Joe lovingly and stubbornly tries to defend herself but breaks down into tears and confesses that she had lied and had been working at a laundry on twenty-fourth Street.

She confides that she had failed to get any pupils to teach piano lessons and taken up the job. She had made up the fictitious story of teaching Clementina and about the Welsh rabbit. That afternoon, a girl in the laundry had unintentionally placed a hot iron on her hand. She begs, Joe not to be angry with her. She feared that Joe would abandon his art classes and take up a job instead. She theorizes that if she hadn’t got the work at the laundry, Joe might not have sold his paintings to the man from Peoria. Delia agrees that it didn’t matter to whom he had sold the paintings and praises him that he was clever enough to sell them the paintings. She asked him curiously how he began to suspect that she wasn’t giving music lessons.

Joe reveals that he wasn’t suspicious until that night. He confesses that he had also been working as a mechanic at the same laundry as she did, for the past two weeks. That afternoon at five O’clock he had salt cotton waste and oil from the engine room for a girl working upstairs, who had her hand burned with a hot iron. They forgive each other and laugh wholeheartedly at the absurdity of the situation. It is ironic how they both made up stories about how they got their money yet they were actually working at same place.

Question 15.
What plan did they have for the night, after both of them brought their salary home?
Answer:
The aspiring artist couple, Joe and Delia Caruthers, go out to learn their chosen art. Everything was fine until they ran out of money. They found it difficult to pay for their art classes. So Delia decides to give piano lessons to keep the fire in their hearth burning. One day, Delia, comes home excited and tells Joe that she has found a pupil. She had been hired to teach piano to a girl named Clementina, the daughter of General A.B. Pinkney, a wealthy man who lived on the seventy first street. She explains Joe that the General had a splendid house, with a Byzantine front door. Clementina was wonderful girl of eighteen years with sweetest and simplest manners, and always dressed in white. Delia was to teach her for three days in a week for five dollars for each lesson. She assures Joe that when she gets two or more pupils, she can continue he classes with Herr Rosenstock.

Joe is distraught. He doesn’t want her to have to work and abandon her own piano lessons. He tells her that he would feel ashamed to let her struggle to earn money to put him through his art classes. He tries to convince Delia, that he could quit his art lessons and find some work, selling papers or laying cobble stones to bring in the money.

Delia vehemently disagrees with him and convinces him to let her give the piano classes. Joe reluctantly agrees. He hopes that he might be able to sell one ofhis paintings that hung in Tinkle’s window ( A Magazine publishing company).

In the next week, the couple had an early breakfast. Each had their own reasons to leave home early. Joe told Delia that he was doing some morning effect sketches in central park. Delia left to teach piano to her pupil.

At the end of the week, Delia’s comes home and proudly places three five dollar bills (notes) on the dining table that she had been paid for giving piano lessons for three days in the week. She seems to be tired and explains that Clementina doesn’t practice enough and she had to teach her the same thing often she talks about General Pinkney and wished that Joe would come to meet him, one day, so that Joe could see the General’s splendid house.

Then, Joe takes out eighteen dollars from his pocket and lays them beside Delia’s earnings. He explains her that he so Ida water¬colour (painting) of the Obelisk, (a tall four sided, narrow – tapering monument with a pyramid at the top) to a man from Peoria. Delia stares at the money in disbelief. She feels that Joe is joking. But Joe convinces her that he had indeed sold the painting to the man from Peoria. He describes him as a fat man with a woollen muffler and a quill toothpick. The man had seen the painting displayed in Tinkle’s window and thought that it was a windmill. But he had bought it. He had even ordered an oil sketch of the Lackawanna freight depot. Joe feigns pride, telling Delia that not only her music lessons can earn money but his art is also in demand. They celebrate their success by dining on Oysters and Filet Mignon (a beef dish) that night.

Question 16.
Why did Joe not sell his sketches to the man from Peoria?
Answer:
Joe actually did not sell any of his sketches to the man from Peoria. The story of the sale of his sketches was a figament of his imagmatioa The aspiring artist couple, Joe and Delia Caruthers, go out to learn their chosen art. Everything was find until they ran out ofmoney. They found it difficult to pay for their art classes. So Delia decides to give piano lessons to keep the fire in their hearth burning.

One day, Delia, comes home excited and tells Joe that she has found a pupil. She had been hired to teach piano to a girl named ‘ Clementina, the daughter of General A.B. Pinkney, a wealthy man who lived on the seventy first street. She explains Joe that the General had a splendid house, with a Byzantine front door. Clementina was wonderful girl of eighteen years with sweetest and simplest manners, and always dressed in white. Delia was to teach her for three days in a week for five dollars for each lesson. She assures Joe that when she gets two or more pupils, she can continue he classes with HerrRosenstock.

Joe is distraught. He doesn’t want her to have to work and abandon her own piano lessons. He tells her that he would feel ashamed to let her struggle to earn money to put him through his art classes. He tries to convince Delia, that he could quit his art lessons and find some work, selling papers or laying cobble stones to bring in the money.

Delia vehemently disagrees with him and convinces him to let her give the piano classes. Joe reluctantly agrees. He hopes that he might be able to sell one ofhis paintings that hung in Tinkle’s window (AMagazine publishing company).

In the next week, the couple had an early breakfast. Each had their own reasons to leave home early. Joe told Delia that he was doing some morning effect sketches in central park. Delia left to teach piano to her pupil.

At the end of the week, Delia’s comes home and proudly places three five dollar bills (notes) on the dining table that she had been paid for giving piano lessons for three days in the week. She seems to be tired and explains that Clementina doesn’t practice enough and she had to teach her the same thing often she talks about General Pinkney and wished that Joe would come to meet him, one day, so that Joe could see the General’s splendid house.

Then, Joe takes out eighteen dollars from his pocket and lays ‘ them beside Delia’s earnings. He explains her that he sold a water-colour (painting) of the Obelisk, (a tall four sided, narrow – tapering monument with a pyramid at the top) to a man from Peoria. Delia stares at the money in disbelief. She feels that Joe is joking. But Joe convinces her that he had indeed sold the painting to the man from Peoria. He describes him as a fat man with a woollen muffler and a quill toothpick. The man had seen the painting displayed in , Tinkle’s window and thought that it was a windmill. But he had bought it. He had even ordered an oil sketch of the Lackawanna ‘ freight depot. Joe feigns pride, telling Delia that not only her music lessons can earn money but his art is also in demand. They celebrate their success by dining on Oysters and Filet Mignon (a beef dish) that night.

Joe love’s Delia dearly. He can’t bear to see her slogging at work to put him through Art class. He is ashamed to let her earn for both of them. He is of opinion that, being a man, he should earn to support his family. So he joins a laundry on the twenty fourth street : as a boiler operator. He hides the fact and weaves the fictions story of selling his sketches to a fat man from Peoria, as it would hurt Della’s feeling, because she dreamt of seeing him as a great painter. They both sacrifice their art for the service, of love – for each other.

Question 17.
How did Delia and Joe confess? Was there any change in their love, after knowing that both had lied? Explain.
Answer:
The next Saturday, Joe came home earlier than Delia. He places eighteen dollars, on the table and washes his hands which were smeared with dark paint. Later, Delia comes home with bandages on her right hand. When Joe was curious to know what had happened, she explained that Clementina, her pupil, had insisted that she cook and share a Welsh rabbit dish with her and had spilled the boiling hot dish on her hands and wrist. The General had applied soothing balm on them and bound her hands with the bandages. She confesses that her hands hurt badly even then.

Joe appears suspicious. He takes her hand tenderly and pulls some white strands from beneath the bandages. As she had seen the money on the table and asks him if had sold another painting that day. Joe tells her that he had sold another painting to that fat man from Peoria. The gentleman had even ordered another painting of a parkscape with the Hudson river in the backdrop.

Suddenly he changes the topic and asks her at what time that afternoon had she burnt her hand. She replies, “Five O’ Clock. The iron -1 mean the rabbit came off the fire about that time”

Joe, asks her to sit down, and gently asks her what she had been doing for the last two weeks. She looks at Joe lovingly and stubbornly tries to defend herself but breaks down into tears and confesses that she had lied and had been working at a laundry on twenty-fourth Street.

She confides that she had foiled to get any pupils to teach piano lessons and taken up the job. She had made up the fictitious story of teaching Clementina and about the Welsh rabbit. That afternoon, a girl in the laundry had unintentionally placed a hot iron on her i hand. She begs, Joe not to be angry with her. She feared that Joe would abandon his art classes and take up a job instead. She theorizes that if she hadn’t got the work at the laundry, Joe might not have sold his paintings to the man from Peoria. Delia agrees that it didn’t matter to whom he had sold the paintings and praises him that’ he was clever enough to sell them the paintings. She asked him curiously how he began to suspect that she wasn’t giving music lessons.

Joe reveals that he wasn’t suspicious until that night. He confesses that he had also been working as a mechanic at the same laundry as she did, for the past two weeks. That afternoon at five O’clock he had sent cotton waste and oil from the engine room for a girl working upstairs, who had her hand burned with a hot iron.

They forgive each other and laugh wholeheartedly at the absurdity of the situation. It is ironic how they both made up stories about how they got their money yet they were actually working at same place.

Joe then remembered the premise “When one loves one’s Art, no service seems ”. Deha cuts him midway saying, “No, Just when one loves…”. Their love for each other made them sacrifice their ambitions for the sake of each other. No, there wasn’t any change in their lowe for each other after knowing that they both had lied. In feet, their love grew more strong than before. They both believe that “when one loves, no service than to hard”, and sacrifice their asptrations for each other.

Question 18.
When they could not pay for their training, what did Delia Carruthers decide? Was she successful in seeking the intended job?
Answer:
In the short story ‘A Service of love ’, Joe Caruthers and Delia, . both aspiring artists fall in love and get married. They join art classes in their chosen fields. Everything was fine until they ran out ofmoney. They found it difficult to pay for their art classes. So, Delia decides to give piano lessons to keep the fire in their hearth burning. But Delia Carruthers could not find any pupil to teach piano. She getsa job ironing shirts at a local laundry on twenty fourth street and earns fifteen dollars every week. But she hides the feet from her husband, because he would be heart – broken when he learns that she has given up pursuing piano lessons, so she lies to Joe that she had found a pupil, Clementira, the daughter of General A.B. Pinkney, a wealthy man who lived on the seventry-first street.

She explains Joe that the General had a splendid house, with a Byzantine front door. Clementina was wonderful girl of eighteen years with sweetest and simplest manners, and always dressed in white. Delia was to teach her for three days in a week for five dollars for each lesson. She assures Joe that when she gets two or more pupils, she can continue he classes with Herr Rosenstock.

Thus, she was not successful! in seeking the intended job of teaching piano to interested pupils.

Question 19.
‘True love shows way to the wandering barks like a light house.’ How far is this statement true to the story? Elucidate.
Answer:
In the short story ‘A Service of love’by O’Henry, Joe Larabee and Delia Caruthers are aspiring artists. Joe aspires to be a famous painter and Delia aspires to be a famous orchestra pianist. Both come to New York to leam their chosen art. They both meet in an Atlier, fall in love and marry. The newly married cuple rent a tiny lonesome flat in the suburbs ofNew York.

Joe Caruthers enrolls in an expensive painting class of the famous Magister, a music scholar. Deha studies Piano under Rosenstock, a Med Musician.

Joe’s ambition was to paint pictares that old, rich men would complete among themselves to have the privilege to accquire one of his paintings. Delia dremt ofbecoming a much sought after or¬chestra pianist. She longs to achieve fame and fortune, that gives her the liberty to decline to play with less famous Orchestra and, instead sit in a private high – class dining room ofa famous restourant dining on lobster’s.

The aspiring artist couple; go out to leam their chosen art after having a light breakfast. They came back home and have long dis-cussions about their hopes and aspirations, their art, while having dinner late in the night.

Everything was fine until they ran out of money. The found it difficult to pay their art classes. So, Delia decides to give piano lessons to keep the fire in their hearth burning. She assures Joe that when she gets two or more pupils; she can continue the classes with Herr Rosenstock. She finds a pupil named Clementina, the daughter of General Pinkney.

Joe is distraught. He doesn’t want her to have to work and abandon her piano classes. He tells her that her would feel ashamed to let her slave to earn money to put him through his art classes. He tries to convince Delia, that he could quit his art lessons and find some work, selling papers or laying cobblestones to bring in the money.

Delia vehemently disagrees with him and convince him to let her give the piano classes. Joe reluctantly agress. He hopes he might be awe to sell one ofhis paintings that hung in Tinkle’s window.

The next Saturday, Joe came home earlier than Delia. He places eighteen dollars, on the table and washes his hands which were smeared with dark paint. Later, Delia comes home with bandages on her right hand. When Joe was curious to know what had happened, she explained that Clementina, her pupil, had insisted that she cook and share a Welsh rabbit dish with her and had spilled the boiling hot dish on her hands and wrist. The General had applied soothing balm on them and bound her hands with the bandages. She confesses that her hands hurt badly even then.

Joe appears suspicious. He takes her hand tenderly and pulls some white strands from beneath the bandages. As she had seen the money on the table and asks him if he had sold another painting that day. Joe tells her that he had sold another painting to that fat man from Peoria. The gentleman had even ordered another painting of a parkscape with the Hudson river in the backdrop.

Suddenly he changes the topic and asks her at what time that afternoon had she burnt her hand. She replies, “Five O’ Clock. The iron -1 mean the rabbit came off the fire about that time”

Joe, asks her to sit down, and gently asks her what she had been doing for the last two weeks. She looks at Joe lovingly and stubbornly tries to defend herself but breaks down into tears and confesses that she had lied and had been working at a laundry on twenty-fourth Street.

She confides that she had failed to get any pupils to teach piano lessons and taken up the job. She had made up the fictitious story of teaching Clementina and about the Welsh rabbit. That afternoon, a girl in the laundry had unintentionally placed a hot iron on her hand. He begs, Joe not to be angry with her. She feared that Joe would abandon his art classes and take up a job instead. She theorizes that if she hadn’t got the work at the laundry, Joe might not have sold his paintings to the man from Peoria. Deha agrees that it didn’t matter to whom he had sold the paintings and praises him that he was clever enough to sell them the paintings. She asked him curiously how he began to suspect that she wasn’t giving music lessons.

Joe reveals that he wasn’t suspicious until that night. He confesses that he had also been working as a mechanic at the same laundry as she did, for the past two weeks. That afternoon at five O’clock he had sent cotton waste and oil from the engine room for a girl working upstairs, who had her hand burned with a hot iron.
They forgive each other and laugh wholeheartedly at the absurdity of the situation. It is ironic how they both made up stories about how they got their money yet they were actually working at same place.

Joe then remembered the premise “When on loves ones”s art, no service seems….” Delia cut him off and says, “No, just when one loves”. Their love for each other made them sacrifice their ambitions for the sake of each other, they proved that when one is in love, no service seems to hard.

Hence, the statement “True love shows way to the wandering barks like light house” is proved to be true.

Question 20.
Bring out the significance of the title ‘A service of love’.
Answer:
In the short story ‘A service of love’ by O’Henry Joe larabee and Delia caruthers are aspiring artists. Joe aspires to be a famous painter and Delia aspires to be a famous orchestra pianist. Both come to New York to learn their closen art. They both meet in an atlier, fall in love and marry. The newly married cuple rent a tiny lonesome flat in the suburbs of New York.

Joe Caruthers enrolls in an expensive painting class of the famous Magister, a music scholar. Delia studies Piano under Rosenstock, a failed Musician.

Joe’s ambition was to paint pictares that old, rich men would complete among themselves to have the privilege to accquire one of his paintings. Delia dreamt of becoming a much sought after or-chestra pianist. She longs to achieve fame and fortune, that gives her the liberty to decline to play with less famous Orchestraj and, instead sit in a private high – class dining room of a famous restourant dining on lobster’s.

The aspiring artist couple; go out to leant their chosen art after having a light breakfast. They came back home and have long dis-cussions about their hopes and aspirations, their art, while having dinner late in the night.

Everything was fine until they ran out of money. The found it difficult to pay their art classes, so, Delia decides to give piano lessons to keep the fire in their hearth burning. She assures joe that when she gets two or more pupils; she can continue the classes with Herr Rosenstock. She finds a pupil named Clementina, the daughter of General Pinkney.

Joe is distraught. He doesn’t want her to have to work and abandon her place classes. He tells her that her would feel ashamed to’let her slave to earn money to put him through his art classes. He tries to cenvince Deha, that he could quit his art lessons and find some work, selling papers or laying cobblestones to bring in the money.

Delia vehemently disagrees with him and convince him to let her give the piano classes. Joe reluctantly agrees. He hopes he might be able to sell one of his paintings that hung in Tinkle’s window.

The next Saturday, Joe came home earlier than Deha He places eighteen dollars, on the table and washes his hands which were smeared with dark paint. Later, Deha comes home with bandages on her right hand. When Joe was curious to know what had, happened, she explained that Clementina, her pupil, had insisted that she cook and share a Welsh rabbit dish with her and had spilled the boiling hot dish on her hands and wrist. The General had applied soothing balm on them and bound her hands with the bandages. She confesses that her hands hurt badly even then.

Joe appears suspicious. He takes her hand tenderly and pulls some white strands from beneath the bandages. As she had seen the money on the table and asks him if had sold another pal*. that day. Joe tells her that he had sold another painting to that fat man from Peoria. The gentleman had even ordered another par g of a parkscape with the Hudson river in the backdrop.

Suddenly he changes the topic and asks her at what time that afternoon had she burnt her hand. She replies, “Five O’ Clock. The iron -1 mean the rabbit came off the fire about that time”

Joe, asks her to sit down, and gently asks her what she had been doing for the last two weeks. She looks at Joe lovingly and stubbornly tries to defend herself but breaks down into tears and confesses that she had lied and had been working at a laundry on twenty-fourth Street.

She confides that she had Med to get any pupils to teach piano lessons and taken up the job. She had made up the fictitious story of teaching Clementina and about the Welsh rabbit. That afternoon, a girl in the laundry had unintentionally placed a hot iron on her hand. He begs, Joe not to be angry with her. She feared that Joe would abandon his art classes and take up a job instead. She theorizes that if she hadn’t got the work at the laundry, Joe might not have sold his paintings to the man from Peoria. Delia agrees that it didn’t matter to whom he had sold the paintings and praises him that he was clever enough to sell them the paintings. She asked him curiously how he began to suspect that she wasn’t giving music lessons.

Joe reveals that he wasn’t suspicious until that night. He confesses that he had also been working as a mechanic at the same laundry as she did, for the past two weeks. That afternoon at five O’clock he had sent cotton waste and oil from the engine room for a girl working upstairs, who had her hand burned with a hot iron.

They forgive each other and laugh wholeheartedly at the absurdity of the situation. It is ironic how they both made up stories about how they got their money yet they were actually working at same place.

Joe then remembered the premise “When on loves ones”s art, no: :rvice seems….” Delia cut him off and says, “No, just when one loves”. Their love for each other made them sacrifice their ambitions for the sake of each other, they proved that when one is in love, no service seems to hard.

Both Joe and Delia were avid lovers of their chosen art. They dreamt of becoming great artists. Joe Larrabee was an excellent painter and Delia was a gifted pianist. Both were proud of their talent. They aspired to be successful and famous artists. Both were learning their art from famous tutors. But when they ran out of money, each of them decided to abandon theft artistic pursuit. Joe was a proud man. He was ashamed to let Delia, abandon her piano lessons and work to put him through art classes. Delia loved Joe very dearly. She also did not want him to leave his art classes and work to put her through piano lessons. Each of them decide to sacrifice their art to support each other, because they sincerely loved each other. Delia lied to Joe that she was earning five dollars a week by teaching piano to a pupil, named Clementina. Joe lied to her, that he was earning money by selling his sketches to a rich old man from Peoria. But they do not come to know that they were working in the same laundry Joe becomes suspicious when he sees Delia has burned ‘ her hand. They confess to each other and also forgive each other, going to work for each other. They sacrified their dreams to protect each others dreams. Hence ‘A service of love’ is an apt title for the short story.

Question 21.
Discuss the irony in the story.
Answer:
The Major element of Irony in the short story ‘A service of love’ is sitiuational irony. O’Henry uses his typical element of surprise at the end of the story to create a sense of shock and disbelif in his readers. We find out that Joe and Delia both lied about their jobs to each other, the irony is that they were both working in the same laundry while they lied about their jobs to each other. Joe grew suspicious when he Delia comes home with a bandaged hand. Joe while working at the boiler in the laundry had sent oil and cotton waste upstairs for a girl who had her hand burned with a hot iron. Both Joe and Delia confess and confide in each other that they had lied to each other about their jobs while working in the same laundry. This leads an element of suspense among the readers as to what happens next. But a the end of the story both Joe and Delia forgive each other and love triumphs.

English Summary

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