All Creatures Great and Small Summary Notes

All Creatures Great and Small About the Author

Ruskin Bond – Bom 19th May 1934 is an Indian author of British descent. This shy literary genius could be easily credited for moulding almost three generations of Indian students into avoid readers. His stories are simple and lucid, a quality that made him a literary star. The stories speak directly to the reader about the charms of the Dehradun hills and the idiosyncrasies of the North Indian terrain.

His first novel, Room on the Roofwas written at the s age of 17 years and had won him John Llewellyn Rhys prize that is awarded to British commonwealth writers who are under the age of 30. It was a semi – autobiographical story of an orphaned Anglo – Indianboy. Ruskin Bond has received the Sahitya Akademi Award, for English Writing in India and also was conferred with Padmashree Awar in 1999 and Padma Bhushan in 2014.

All Creatures Great and Small Summary

The given lesson “All creatures Great and small” is a short funny story by the British Indian author Ruskin Bond. Here the author explores the funny situations that people who keep strange and unusual creatures as pets experience in their life.

The given lesson “All creatures Great and small” is a short funny story by the British Indian author Ruskin Bond. Here the author explores the funny situations that people who keep strange and unusual creatures as pets experience in their life.

The author tells us that his grandmother was tolerant to birds and animals but reptiles repelled her. They made her blood run cold. One day the grandfather bought a four feet long python from a snake charmer at the bazaar. While waking back home he tried to inpress the bazaar crowd by slinging it across his shoulders.

The grandmother nearly tainted at the sight of the pyton curled around grandfather and she horrifically cried out to him to get rid of it. But grandfather was in no mood to listen, he protested and said that the python was young and he would soon get used to them.

Grandmother lashed back at him saying that she had no intention to get used to the python and reminded him that his cousin Mabel would be coming to stay the next day and that she would leave the very next moment she comes to know of the snake in the house. Grandfather disliked Aunt Mabel.

He thought that she was fussy. So he gleefully told grandmother that they ought to show it to her as soon as she arrived. Later grandmother ordered grandfather to lock the python bathroom and go back to the bazaar and get the snake charmer to take the python back.

After sometime grandfather returned home with a sad face. He could not find the snake charmer. So grandmother asked him to take it and leave it in the jungle across the river.

When grandfather opened the bathroom door, they were surprised to see that the snake had vanished. Even after a careful search all over the house and the garden did not yield any result. Grandfather, assured everyone that the snake was gone for good.

When Aunt Mabel arrived the next day, everyone were apprehensive that the snake might make an appearance. But when it didn’t show up they thought it had gone away.

That evening, they heard a terrible scream and seconds later they saw Aunt Mabel come flying up the veranda stairs, as though she had seen a ghost. She gasped and told that while she was reaching for a guava she saw something staring at her. She said the eyes looked at her as though it would devour her. She was sure that the snake was a boa – constrictor and thought that it might have been twenty feet long.

Grandfather chivalrously took hold of an umbrella and sheepishly declared that he would go and kill the snake. When the author told his grandfather innocently that Aunt Mabel might have frightened the snake away. His grandfather scolded him for saying so, but the author saw that his eyes were alive with laughter.

Later, the python began to show up at unexpected places. Aunt Mabel-packed her bags when she saw the python admiring her from under a cushion.

One day the author saw the snake gazing at its own reflection in the dressing table mirror. The snake made a habit of gazing at itself in the mirror. Grandfather commented that the snake had fallen in love with its own reflection in the mirror. The author made a funny comment that the snake was trying to look better for aunt Mabel and received a slap on his head from his grandmother.

Grand father declared that he now came to know the weakness of the snake. He made a large cage and placed a mirror in it along with food items. After a few days the author saw the snake curled up in the cage after devouring all the food and admiring itself in the mirror, with a smile on his face. (The author felt that the snake was smiling). Eventually they took the snake to the forest across the river in a pony trap and left it there with the trap door open.

All Creatures Great and Small Glossary

  • Sling: Wrap around
  • Exasperating: Annoying
  • Awestruck: Amazed, wonderstruck
  • Crestfallen: Disappointed
  • Relentless: Determined, unyielding
  • File: A line of people
  • Davour: Eat very fast
  • Sheepishly: Ashamedly
  • Sallied out: Rushed out, set out
  • Hysterics: Being extremely shocked
  • Enamored with: Attracted to, fascinated
  • Canceited: Proud of oneself, vain

All Creatures Great and Small Questions and Answers

Short Answer Questions

Question 1.
Whom did the grandfather get the python from?
Answer:
Grandfather bought the phyton from a snake charmer, for six rupees.

Question 2.
How did he impress the crowds with the Python?
Answer:
The grand father impressed the bazaar crowd by slining the python across his shoulders and walking home with it.

Question 3.
Grandmother was tolerant of most birds and animals but drew the line at reptile pets.

Question 4.
Who was Mabel and why did the grandfather dislike her?
Answer:
Mabel was grandfather’s cousin Grandfather disliked her because she was fussy.

Question 5.
Why did the grandfather feel crestafallen?
Answer:
Grandfather was crestfallen because he hadn’t been able to find the snake charmer, fromwhomhe had bought the young Python.

Question 6.
Where was the Python kept and how did it escape?
Answer:
The Python was placed in a steep – sided tin tub in the bathroom

Question 7.
How did Aunt Mabel react to the Python’s first appearance?
Answer:
Aunt Mabel was trying to pluck a guava, when she first saw the Python on a nearby branch. She screamed and went flying up the veranda steps, looking as though she had seen a ghost.

Question 8.
When did Aunt Mabel decide to pack her bags and leave?
Answer:
After Aunt Mabel first saw the Python, it began to make a series of appearances, often at unexpected places. Aunt Mabel had another fit of hysterics when she saw him admising her from under a cushion. So She decided to pack her bags and leave.

Question 9.
The Python’s weakness as perceived by the granfather was:
(a) Umbrella
(b) Reflection
(c) Juicy chicken
Answer:
(b) Reflection

II. Answer the Following Questions in About a Page:

Paragraph Answer Questions.

Question 1.
Explain the chaos created by the arrival of the python in the grandfather’s house?
Answer:
The arrival of the python certainly created a chaos in the author’s house. Grandmother nearly feinted at the sight of the python curled round grandfather’s throat. She was afraid that the python would strangle grandfather and asked him to get rid of it at once. Grandmother reminded grandfather of his cousin, Aunt Mabel’s visit and that she would leave the house as soon as she leam’t that was a python in the house.

Later she asked him to lock it in bathroom and go to the bazaar and find the snake charmer and gci him to come and take it back. But the snake – charmer couldn’t be found. So grandmother asked him to leave it in a jungle across the when grandfather opened the bathroom door, the Python was awhere in sight. Even after a careful search, they could not find it. They conculded that the pyton had gone away somewhere else.

Question 2.
Describe Aunt Mabel’s reaction to the presence of the Python?
Answer:
After Aunt Mabel arrived at their house, both grandfather and the author were apprehensive of the Pythons re appearance but I when it did not appear after a couple of days they felt confident that the Python had gone for good. That evening they heard a terrible scream and seconds later they saw Aunt Mabel come flying up the veranda steps, looking as though she had seen a ghost.

She gasped as she told themthat when she was reaching for a guava, she had seen a snake staring at her, with a hungry look, as though it would devour her. Aunt Mabel imagined that the snake must be a boa constrictor and must have been twenty feet long she felt that its eyes looked terrible and looked at her in a queer way. One day when Aunt Mabel saw the Python admiring her from under a cushion, she packed her bags and decided to go home.

Question 3.
How did the grandfather finally succeed in caging the Python?
Answer:
The Python got into the habit of admiring his reflection in the dressing table mirror. Grandfather then thought that he had found the vulnerability of the Python and hatched a plan. He made a large cage with a mirror at one end. He left a Jucicy chicken and various other delicacies inside, and fitted up the opening with a trap door.

After a few days the author found the Python curled up in the cage after having eaten everything left out for him. The Python was relaxing in front ofthe mirror admiring himself The author imagined that the Python had a smile on its face. He quietly lowered the trapdoor and thus they succeeded in trapping the Python.

III. Answer the Following Questions and Answers in About two Pages:

Essay Answer Questions

Question 1.
Bring out the humour with reference to Aunt Mabel and the Python in the story?
Answer:
The short story “All creatures great and small” is written by the British Indian author, Ruskin Bond. The story is full of tonuge – in – check humour and most conversations appear hilarious, especially those concerned with Aunt Mabel.

The grandfather had brought a Python to the house as a pet. When grandmother protests, grandfather tells her she will get used to him. Grandmother scorns and tells him that she had no intention of getting used to him.

She inform him that his cousin Mabel was coming to stay with them the next day and that die’ll leave the very next moment she come’s to know that there was a snake m the house. Grandfather, did not look forward to fussy aunt Mabel’s visit’s any more than the author. So grandfather retorts that they ought to show the Python as soon as she arrived.

Grandmother compels grandfather to return the snake to the snake charmer. So he locks the Python in their bathroom and goes to the bazaar to find him. But the man is nowhere to be found. Grandfather comes back home looking crestfallen and grandmother asks him to take it away and leave it in the jungle across the river. To their utter dismay the Python and slipped away from the bathroom and after searching for it everywhere they concluded that it was gone for good.

The next day Aunt Mabel arrived for her three week stay in their house that evening they heard a terrible scream and seconds later they saw Aunt Mabel come flying up the Veranda steps, looking as though she had seen a ghost.

She gasped as she told them that when she was reaching for a guava, on the tree m the garden, she had seen a snake staring at her, with a hungry look, as though it would devou her. Aunt Mabel imagined that the snake must be a boa – constrictor and must have been twenty – feet long. She felt that its eyes looked terribel and looked at her in a queer way.

Grand father tells her that he’ll go out and kill it, before sheepishly taking hold of an umberalla as a weapon and sallted out into the garden, followed by the author. When they were out of Aunt Mabel’s hearing range the author comments that Aunt Mabel must have seared the Python away. His grandfather chides him that he shouldn’t be speaking about his aunt in that way. But the author sees that his grandfather’s eyes were alive with laughter.

After this incident the Python began to make a series of appearances at unexpected places. Aunt Mabel had another fit of hysteries when she saw him admiring her from under a cushion. She immediately packed her bags and decided to hasten from their house.

The Python then began to to be enamoured by his own reflection in the dressing table mirror. He was to be seen admiring himself in the dressing table mirror whenever he was spotted in the house. The author humourausly commented that the Python was trying to look better for Aunt Mabel. The author’s attempt at such humour, brought the flat of his grandmother’s broad hand on his head. He was slapped on his head by his grandmother.

Question 2.
Comment on the distinction in the preferences of the elderely couple towards the exotic pet in the story?
Answer:
The short story “All creatures great and small” is written by Ruskin Bond. The author brings out the unusal taste of some people who like to keep peculiar creatures as pets. While others are mortified by such creatures.

In the story the grandfather had unusual pets such as a handsome, sweet tempered chameleon. Many people have unusual . pets because those are far more exciting than the ordinary ones.

Grand mother was tolerant of most birds and animals, but she drew the line at reptiles. Grandmother puts her trot down when grandfather brings home a young Python. She said they made her blood run cold.

Even a handsome, sweet tempered chameleon had to be given up even though grandfather knew that there was little chance ofhis being allowed to keep the Python he bought the Python from a snake – charmer at the bazaar for six rupees. He walked back home, slinging the Python across his shoulders, trying to impress the bazaar crowd.

Grandmother nearly fainted at the sight of the Python curled round Grandfather’s throat. She cried out to grandfather that it would strangle him and he should get rid of it at once. But grandfather adamantly told her that the Python was a young fellow and he would get used to them.

But grandmother rehemently retorts that she had no itnention of getting used to it. Grandmother reminds grandfather that his cousion, Mabel would be coming to their house to spen a few weeks with them and she would certainly go back the very minute she sees the snake. The Grand mother then orders grandfather to take the Python and give it back to the snake charmer.

Question 3.
The python had fallen in love with his own reflection. Elucidate?
Answer:
The grandmother asks grandfather to lock the Python in bathroom and go to the bazaar and find the snake – charmer and get him to take it back. But the snake had slipped away and could not be found any where.

After two days the Python began to make a series of appearances, often in unexpected places. It scared Aunt Mabel and she packed her bags and left.

One morning the author saw the Python curled up on the dresing table, gazing at his reflection in the mirror. The Python had made it a habit of making his appearance at the dressing mirror often. Evidently he had become enamoared with his own reflection. Grand father observed that perhaps the attention he was receiving from everyone had made him a ltitle conceited. The author makes a funny remark that the Python was trying to look better for Aunt Mabel and got a slap on his head from his grandmother in return.

The python’s enamour for his own reflection ultimately led to him being trapped. Using this weakness ofthe python, grandfather lured it into a trap in which he had placed a mirror.

One morning the author saw the python curled up in the trap admiring himself in the mirror with something resembling or smile on his face. Even as the author lowerd the trapdoor gently, the python took no notice, he was in raptures over his handsome reflection later they took the python and left the trap in the jungles with the trap door open.

All Creatures Great and Small Language Activity

Articles

Read the following passages and fill in the blanks with suitable articles.

1. A boy received a note from a friend written in an illegible hand. After struggling to understand its meaning, he ultimately hit upon the idea of enlisting with the help of a local druggist. The girl at the drugstore looked at the note for an whole minute, then took a large brown bottle from the shelf, placed it on the couter.

2. A friend asked Muskan for a sum of money. Muskan was convinced that the money would not be etumed. But since he did not want to offend the friend and the sum asked for was a small one, he gave him the money. To his great surprise, exactly one week after the loan was given, the man returned the money.

3. When the Parsis first came to Gujarat, the king did not want them to settle there. He had already too many people in the kingdom. So he sent the Parsi community a diplomatic, symbolic language; a full glass of milk, to indicate the glass could contain no more.

The Parsis poured a spoonful of sugar into it and stirred it, and sent back the glass of milk – indicating that like sugar they would mix with the population, take no extra space, and sweeten it all. The king was pleased and persuaded the Parsis came to stay.

4. A child with all the behaviours of a monkey has been found in Africa. He was found living with a tribe of monkeys and taken to an orphanage. The boy, whose age is estimated to be between five and seven, is believed to have lost his parents at about the age of one and to have been mothered by a chimpanzee or a gorilla.

The jungle boy gets about by jumping like a monkey with his hands clenched; when still, he squats on his rump, and if approached, scratches. He grunts and squeals and eats indiscriminately: grass, clothes, bedding, even stones. Shunning the company of humans, he neither smiles nor shows any interest whatsoever, in his surroundings.

English Summary

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