The Adventure Of The Three Students Summary Notes

The Adventure Of The Three Students Author

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (1859 – 1930) was a Scottish writer and a Physician born on May 22, 1859, in Edinburgh, Scotland. Doyle’s ‘The Sherlock Holmes’ stories are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction. Doyle wrote over fifty short stories featuring the famous detective. In addition to the famous detective. In addition to the series of stories chronicling the activities of Sherlock Holmes and his friend Dr. John Watson for which he is well-known, he wrote on a wide range of topics, both fictional and non – fictional. He was a very prolific writer who wrote more than 240 kinds of fiction of all genres like History, fantasy, adventure, Science – fiction, crime, drama, war and more than 1200 other works as essays, pamphlets, articles, and letters to the press, poems, interviews and plays.

The Adventure Of The Three Students Summary

The short story ‘The Adventure of the Three Students’ is extracted from ‘The Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was a Scottish writer and Physician. He is well known for his creation and chronicling the activities of the fictitious detective character Sherlock Holmes and his friend Dr. Watson.

In the story, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are staying in a lodge at the university town, St. Lukes, where Holmes is conducting research into early English charters. At that time, Prof. Hilton Soames, tutor and lecturer at the college of St. Lukes brings a case to the detective, relying on his discretion.

On the day the crime was committed, Mr. Soames had received the proofs of a large unseen passage of Greek translation of Thucydides’ at three O’clock in the afternoon. The passage would appear in the Greek language examination for the prestigious Fortescue scholarship. While he was correcting the proofs, he remembered that he had agreed to take tea at a friend’s room at four-thirty, and left the proofs upon his desk, and went out after locking the door of his room. When he returned after an hour, he was amazed to see the key in the lock, he assumed that his manservant, had carelessly left the key in the lock.

When Mr Soames entered his room and looked at his table, he immediately knew that someone had rummaged among the proofs, and one of the three pages was lying on the floor, and the second in the window and the third where he had left it on his table as before. He suspected that Bannister must have examined the papers but when Bannister denied it with utmost earnestness he believed him. Bannister told him that he had forgotten the key in the lock when he had come there to enquire if he needed any tea, but he did not find him there. Bannister had been so upset with the incident that he had turned white and collapsed in a chair near the window.

Mr. Soames informs Mr. Holmes that Bannister, had worked for him for the past ten years and his character and conduct was above reproach. Additionally, Mr. Soames told Homes that he had identified a new scratch on his new fine leather writing table which he swears was unblemished before the incident and that he had found a small ball of black dough, or clay, with specks of sawdust on it on the table.

Mr. Soames was agitated by the scandal, the incident would create which would be detrimental to the integrity of the college and had left, Bannister still collapsed on the chair and come to Holmes for help.

Holmes assures Mr. Soames of his help because he found the case very interesting. Holmes enquires Mr. Soames whether anyone had visited his room after the papers had come to him. Mr. Soames informed him that only the Indian student named Daulat Ras had come and he is not sure if the student had guessed that they were the exam proofs, because they were rolled up. He also informs Holmes that he had locked the papers, when he left his room to meet Holmes.

Holmes and Dr. Watson return with Mr. Soames to the college. The tutor’s room was on the ground floor and the three students rooms where above, one on each storey. The stair case to the rooms above Mr. Soames room went up beside a window that overlooked into Mr. Soames room. Holmes went up the stairs to the window and attempts to look through it into Mr. Soames room. He had to stand on tiptoe and crane his neck forward to look into the room through the window.

Holmes deduces that the culprit must have entered the room through the door and not through the window as it was difficult to reach up to the window. Holmes then examines Mr. Soames’ room, and finds everything exactly as Mr. Soames had described except that, the servant, Bannister, had recovered and gone out. During further examination of the room, Holmes deduces that the culprit had tried to copy the proofs with a pencil. He had copied the first page and tossed it on the floor and while copying the second page, in a hurry, had broken his pencil lead and had sharpened it again with a blunt knife.

He had carried the page over to the window table because from there he could see if anyone was approaching the room. Holmes had found bits of pencil shavings near the window. After examining the pencil shavings, Holmes, explains that the pencil was not an ordinary one. It was above the usual size, with soft lead; the outer colour was dark blue and the marker’s name was printed in silver lettering, and the piece remaining was about an inch and half long. Holmes explained how he deduced that the remaining pencil was inch and half long. He held out a small chip with the ‘letter ‘NN’ and a space of clear wood after them. He elaborated his explanation saying that the letters ‘NN’ must be at the end of the word, and that everyone knows that Johann Faber is the most common pencil maker’s name. It can be deduced that the pencil was about an inch and halflong because the maker’s name is usually printed at about 2 inches from the other end of the pencil.

Later Holmes examines the central table on which Mr. Soames had left the proofs, before going to his friend’s room. He finds the black pellets of clay and the tear on the leather as Mr. Soames had described. He says to Mr. Soames that the case is getting more interesting and asks where the door next to the table leads. Mr. Soames tells him that it leads to the bedroom. Holmes investigates the bedroom and again finds similar small pyramids of clay behind the curtain, behind which Mr. Soames hung his clothes. Holmes deduces that the culprit may have hid behind the curtain, when he heard someone opening the door to the room, before escaping, while Mr. Soames had gone to visit Holmes at the lodge.

Holmes then asks Mr. Soames about the three students who would appear for the exams, and if he suspected anyone. Mr. Soames is hesitant to admit any of the three students are culprits. He gives a detailed description of the characters of the three students. The student named Gilchrist occupied the room above Mr. Soames room. Gilchrist was a tall, flaxen-haired, slim young man. He was the son of the ill – famous, Sir Jabez Gilchrist who had lost his fortune at the horse – races. Gilchrist was a fine scholar and athlete, who played the Rugby team and cricket team for the college and got his blue for the hurdles and long jump. Though he was poor he was hard-working and industrious and Mr. Soames predicted that he will do well in the exam.

The room above Gilchrist’s was occupied by a young Indian student named Daulat Ras. He was a silent, little hook-nosed fellow. He was a hard-working student. Although he was weak in Greek language, he studied hard and was methodical in his approach to studies.

The top floor was occupied by Miles Me Laren, a brilliant young man, when he chose to study hard. He was one of the brightest students of the university. But he was wayward, corrupt, immoral and unprincipled. He was nearly expelled from the college over a card scandal in his first year. He was a moody fellow and used abusive language when he was in a foul mood. Mr. Soames informed Holmes that Miles Me Laren had been lazy through the whole term and appeared not to have studied for the exam and he would be afraid to take up the exams.

Later, Holmes examined Bannister. Bannister was a loyal servant of Mr. Soames and had worked for him for the past ten years. Mr. Soames never had any doubts about his honesty. Bannister was a little, white-faced, clean-shaven, grizzly-haired man of fifty. He had a plump face. He appeared nervous and was restless. He admits that he had not touched the proofs and that he had the tea-tray in his hands and left the key in lock and forgot about it. When Holmes particularly asked him why he chose to sit on that chair near the window he confided that it didn’t matter to him where he sat, when he felt faint, when he heard the news of the theft. He also tells Holmes that he does not suspect any of the three students. As a parting shot, Holmes asked Bannister if he mentioned the tampering of the proofs to any of the three students, Bannister confidently told that he definitely had not mentioned it to them.

Holmes intended to follow the clue offered by the pencil shavings, and also judge the height of the three students. So he asked Mr. Soames to take him to the rooms of each of these three students. He warns Mr. Soames not to mention any names he had deduced that only the three students who had taken the Greek exam would benefit by cheating in the exam. So in order to confirm who had indeed tried to copy the exam proofs. He had to find the pencil used to copy the proof and to whom it belonged to. So he visited each student in their rooms.

Holmes was first taken to Gilchrist’s room. Holmes saw that Gilchrist was a tall young man. There were some really curious pieces of mediaeval domestic architecture within the room. Holmes pretended to be charmed with one of them, that he insisted on drawing it on his notebook and broke his pencil lead. He borrowed one from Gilchrist and later borrowed a knife to sharpen his own pencil.

Later he was taken to the Indian student, Daulat Ras’ room. He made the presentation of studying the architecture of the room in the same way as he had done in Gilchrist’s room. Holmes was then taken to Miles Me Laren’s room. But the student abused them in a torrent of bad language and refused to open the door. Later Holmes went to the town market with the pencil chips and asked if he could buy one of a similar pencil from the stationers. He was informed that such a pencil was not stocked but could be procured on demand. Holmes then returned to the college and winds up his investigation.

The next morning at eight O’clock Holmes tells Dr. Watson that he had solved the case. Holmes had got up early at six in the morning and collected three little clay pyramids, identical to the one’s found in Mr. Soames room. Holmes and Dr. Watson go to Prof. Soames room and find him in a state of pitiable agitation. Holmes calms him down and reassures him that the exams could be conducted as scheduled because he had found out the culprit. But Holmes proposes a private court-martial so that the matter can be kept a secret to avoid any scandal.

Holmes then deliberately made seating arrangements in Mr. Soames’s room in such a way so that, Bannister would be compelled to sit on the same chair by the window as he did the day before. They call Bannister to the room and ask him to confess the truth. Bannister vehemently denies any role in the crime. Holmes accuses Bannister, that on the previous day when he was summoned by Mr. Soames, (when he discovered the crime) Bannister had collapsed into that chair to hide some object that would have revealed the identity of the culprit. And when Mr. Soames had left the room to seek help, he had let out the culprit who was hiding in the bedroom. Bannister continues to deny everything and so Gilchrist is summoned from his room, and Holmes accuses Gilchrist of being guilty. Gilchrist thinks that Bannister had confessed everything and looks at him with horror and reproach. But Bannister protests with Gilchrist that he had never said one word about the crime.

Holmes points out to Gilchrist that he was in a hopeless position and asks him to confess everything. Gilchrist is overcome by the emotion of starts to cry pitiably. Holmes then recounts the findings ofhis investigation. Holmes had concluded that the guilty person had accidentally found out the papers on Mr. Soames table were the exam proofs, and only a tall man could have looked into the room’s window to observe the papers. And so he had visited each student to judge their height The accidental leaving of the key in the lock tempted the culprit to commit the crime. Gilchrist was the tallest of the three students and when he came to know that Gilchrist was a long jumper with the additional evidence of the claypyrimads, he was sure that Gilchrist was the culprit.

Holmes then narrates how the incident had actually happened. The previous day Gilchrist had been practising high jump at the college grounds. After he had finished, he passed Mr. Soames window while on the way up the stairs to his room. Because of his height, he had spied the proofs on Mr. Soames table. He presumed that they were the next days’ question papers.

Bannister had forgotten to take the keys from the lock on Mr. Soames door when he had entered the room to enquire ifMr.Soames needed tea. When Gilchrist saw the key at the door, he impulsively used the opportunity to enter the room to see if they were indeed the question papers. After entering the room, Gilchrist had placed the spiked shoes on Mr. Soames table and the gloves on the chair near the window. While he was copying the proofs in a hurry he had broken the pencil lead and had sharpened it. After finishing copying the first page he had dropped it on the floor. He had taken the second paper to the window table to copy so that he would be able to see if anyone was approaching the room. But Mr. Soames had entered the building through the side door.

When Gilchrist heard someone at the door, he had pulled the spiked shoes from the door and rushed to the bedroom and hid behind the curtain, behind which Mr. Soames hung his clothes. Mr. Soames had entered the room and when he found that the proofs had tampered, he rang the alarm. Bannister came to

the room, and saw Gilchrist’s tan gloves lying on the chair beside the window. He understood everything that had happened in the room, and had flopped on the chair to hide the gloves before Mr.Soames saw them. When Mr.Soames left to contact Holmes, Bannister had let Gilchrist out of the room.

Gilchrist acknowledges all that Holmes had narrated to be true. Gilchrist then reveals that he had in his possession a letter of confession, addressed to Mr. Soames, which he had written even before he was proved guilty. He had written ‘I have determined not to go for the examination, I have been offered a commission in the Rhodesian Police, and I am going out to SouthAfrica at once’.

Gilchrist says that he had been advised by Bannister not to take up the exam and set him on the right path. Bannister then admits that he had been in the service of young Gilchrist’s father,Mr. Jabez Gilchrist, and had looked after young Gilchrist in his childhood days. When Jabez Gilchrist had lost all his fortune at the horse – races, he had joined the service of Mr. Soames, ten years ago. But he was loyal to his former master and tried to save young Gilchrist from scandal and shame. Holmes ends the case, wishing young Gilchrist all the best in the future and goes to have breakfast.

The Adventure Of The Three Students Glossary

Laborious           : hard, difficult
Agitation            : anxiety, nervousness
Thucydides        : Thucydides was a General and Historian in Athens
Baize                 : rough material used for covering billiard and card tables
Deplorable        : shameful
Rummaged       : searched
Discreetly          : in a careful manner so as to keep something confidential
Unscrupulous   : having no moral principles
Enigmatic          : mysterious, unexplainable
Concealed         : hidden
Turf                   : grass
Specks              : dots, marks
Lichen tinted    : coloured with the lichen plant
Gothic              : a style of architecture with tall towers
Wayward         : difficult to control, rebellious
Dissipated       : corrupt, immoral
Askance           : look of suspicion
Retreat            : withdraw, run away
Tamper           : cause damage
Jagged            : rough with sharp point
Ghastly           : terrifying
Lithe               : flexible
Agile               : Active, fit

The Adventure Of The Three Students Questions & Answers

Comprehension

Question 1.
Who was Mr. Soames?
Answer:
Mr. Soames was the tutor and lecturer at the college of St.Luke’s.

Question 2.
What did Mr. Watson observe about him on that particular day?
(a) He was tall
(b) He was nervous
(c) He was restless
(d) He was agitated
Answer:
(d) He was agitated

Question 3.
Why did he come to meet Holmes?
Answer:
Mr. Soames had come to meet Holmes because someone had rummaged among question papers of the Greek language examination for the Fortescue scholarship. The question paper contained large unseen passage of Greek translation. It would naturally be of immense advantage if a candidate had seen the question paper because he could prepare for the exam in advance. Hence Mr. Soames met Helmes to ask him to find the culprit.

Question 4.
Who was Bannister?
Answer:
Bannister, was Mr. Soames, a manservant who had looked after his room for ten years.

Question 5.
Which of these qualities are ascribed to Bannister by Soames?
(a) honesty
(b) suspiciousness
(c) deplorability
(d) forgetfulness
Answer:
(a) honesty

Question 6.
Why did Soames suspect that someone had rummaged through the papers?
Answer:
Mr. Soames had left the three long slips of the proof, together on his table. When he returned to his room after having tea at a friends room, he found one of the papers lying on the floor, another was on the side table near the window, and the third was where he had left i.e., on the table. Thus he suspected that someone had rummaged through the papers.

Question 7.
Why did Soames want to resolve the matter quietly and discreetly?
Answer:
Soames wanted to resolve the matter quietly and discreetly because, if the culprit was not identified the examination had to be postponed until fresh question papers were prepared. But could not be done without explanation, since it leads to a scandal and the integrity of both the college and the university will be doubted.

Question 8.
Who were the three suspects in the case?
Answer:
The three suspects were Daulat Ras, an Indian student; Gilchrist an athlete and scholar, and Miles Me Laren, a brilliant student.

Question 9.
Which of the three rooms Holmes couldn’t visit? Why?
Answer:
Holmes couldn’t visit Miles Me Laren’s room. He did not open the door and abused them in bad language from inside saying that he had to prepare for the exam the next day, and he had no time to talk to anyone.

Question 10.
What was the fresh piece of evidence produced by Holmes to Watson on the next day?
Answer:
Holmes produced three little pyramids of black, doughy clay as fresh pieces of evidence the next day.

Question 11.
Why did Holmes make the seating arrangements as if for a court martial before summoning Bannister?
Answer:
Holmes made the seating arrangements in such a way so that Bannister would be compelled to sit on the same chair by the window as he did the day before. He felt that he could make Bannister confess if he had sat on that particular chair to conceal some object which could have shown who had been in the room.

Question 12.
Who was the real culprit?
Answer:
The real culprit was Gilchrist.

Question 13.
What was Bannister’s involvement in the crime?
Answer:
The previous day Gilchrist had been practising high jump at the college ground. After he had finished, he passed Mr. Soames window, and because of his height, he had spied the papers on Mr. Soames table. He presumed that they were the next day’s question papers. Bannister had forgotten the keys to Mr. Soames room when he had entered it to enquire if Mr. Soames needed tea. Mr. Soames had left this room only minutes after Bannister had left.

When Gilchrist saw the key at the door, he impulsively used the opporunity to enter the room to see if they were indeed the question paper proofs. After entering the room, Gilchrist had placed his gloves on the chair near the window while he was coping the question paper, he heard someone at the door, he took his spiked shoes and rushed to the bedroom and hid behind the curtain, behind which Mr. Soames hung his clothes.

Mr. Soames had entered the room and when he found that the proofs had been rummaged, he rang the alarm. Bannister came to the room, and saw Gilchrists tan gloves lying on the chair beside the window. He understood everything that had happened in the room, and had flopped on the chair to hide the gloves before Mr. Soames saw them. When Mr. Soames left to contact Holmes, Bannister let Gilchrist out of the room.

Bannister had served, Gilchrist’s father before he came in the service of Mr. Soames. He had looked after Gilchrist when he was a young child. To present any scandal, Bannister had let him out, after strongly advising him not to take up the next days Greek exam.

Question 14.
What evidences did Soames relate to Holmes to prove that someone had been to the room and had copied the papers?
Answer:
The evidences that Mr. Soames related to Holmes to prove that someone had been to the room and had copied the papers are:
a) The proof was in three long slips, which he had left together on the table. He found one of them lying on the floor, one on the side table, and the third on the table itself where he had left them
b) Mr. Soames had a new writing table with a fine surface of red leather, which he swears was unblemished. He found a clean cut in about three inches long, not a mere scratch but a positive cut. He also found a small ball of black dough, or clay, with specks of something which looked like sawdust in it. He was convinced that the person who had rifled the papers, had left it there.

Question 15.
Describe the three suspects in the case.
Answer:
He was the son of the notorious Sir Jabez Gilchrist who had lost his fortune at horse races. Gilchrist was a tall, flaxen-haired, slim young man. Gilchrist was a fine scholar, an athlete who played the Rugby team and cricket team for the college and got his Blue for the hurdles and the long jump. Though he was poor, he was hard-working and industrious. Though he had attempted to copy the Greek question paper, he confessed his crime and as redemption for his act, he had not only decided not to appear for the exam but to leave the college. He had great respect for Bannister, even though he was a man servant at their house. He listened to Bannister’s advice and decided no to take the exam. He was fine figure of a man, tall, lihe, and agile, with a springy step and a pleasant open face. He had blue eyes.

Daulat Ras was a an young Indian student. He was a silent, little, hook-nosed fellow. He was a hard-working student, although he was weak in Greek language, he studied hard and methodical in his approach to his studies.

Miles Me Laren was a brilliant young man, when he chose to study hard he was one of the brightest intellects of the university. But he was wayward, dissipated and unprincipled. He was nearly expelled from the college over a card scandal in his first year. He was a moody fellow and used abusive language When he was in a foul mood.

Question 16.
Write a short note on Bannister.
Answer:
Bannister was the loyal servant of Mr. Soames. He had looked after Mr. Soames for ten years. He was a loyal and honest servant. He was a little, white-faced, clean-shaven, grizzly-haired Fellow of fifty. He had a plump face. His honesty according to Mr. Hilton Soames was absolutely above suspicion when Bannister heard the news that the proofs had tampered, he had turned white and nearly fainted and collapsed on the chair near the window.

During his investigation of the cheating case, Holmes, also questions Bannister. He finds Bannister is quite unsettled by all the questioning. At the close of the investigation, Bannister breaks down and admits his involvement in the crime.

We later come to know that Bannister was employed in the house of Mr. Jabez Gilchrist, the father of young Gilchrist. He had looked after young Gilchrist during this childhood days. When Jabez Gilchrist had lost his fortune at horse – races, Bannister joined the service of Mr. Hilton Soames. Being loyal to his former employer, Bannister had tried to save young Gilchrist of the scandal and shame.

Question 17.
How did Holmes deduce that the pencil was one and a half inches long?
Answer:
The pencil was not an ordinary one, it was above the usual size, with a soft lead, the outer colour was dark blue, the marker’s name was printed in silver lettering, and the piece remaining was about an inch and half long.

Holmes explained how he deduced that the pencil was about an inch and half long. He held out a small chip with the letters ‘NN’ and a space of clear wood after them. He elaborated his explanation saying that the letters ‘NN’ must be at the end of the word and that everyone knows that Johann Faber is the most common maker’s name.

This deduction explains that the pencil was about an inch and half long because it was because the maker’s name on almost all pencils are usually printed at about 2 inches from the other end of a pencil.

Question 18.
Why did Holmes visit each one of the three students in their room? What did he do in each of these rooms?
Answer:
Holems intended to follow the clue offered by the pencil shavings andjpdge the height of the three students. He had deduced that only the three students who had taken the Greek exam would benefit by cheating in the exam. So in order to confirm who had indeed tried to copy the exam proof, he had to find the pencil, used to copy the proof and to whom it belonged to. So he visited each student in their rooms.

Holmes was first taken to, Gilchrist’s room. There were some really curious pieces of mediaeval domestic architecture within the room Holmes pretended to be charmed with one of them that he insisted on drawing it on his note – book and broke his pencil. He borrowed one from Gilchrist and later borrowed a knife to sharpen his own pencil.

Later he was taken to the Indian sutdent, Daulat Ras’ room. He made the pretention of studying the architecture of the room in the same way as he had done in Gilchrists room. Holmes was then taken to Miles Mclaren’s room. But the student abused them in a torrent of bad language and refused to open the door.

Question 19.
Who was Bannister trying to protect? Why?
Answer:
Bannister was trying to protect Gilchrist. Bannister was employed in the house of Mr. Jabez Gilchrist, the father of young Gilchrist. He had looked after young Gilchrist during his childhood days. When Jabez Gilchrist had lost his fortune at horse – races, he joined the service of Mr. Hilton Soames. Being loyal to his former employer, Bannister had tried to save young Gilchrist, of the scandal and shame.

Question 20.
Describe in detail how the crime was committed.
Answer:
Mr. Hilton Soames, was the tutor and lecturer at the college of St.Luke’s. On the day the crime was committed, he received the proofs of a large unseen passage of Greek translation at three o’ clock in the afternoon. The passage would appear in the Greek language examination for the prestegious Fortescue scholarship. At four – thirty, he remembered that he had agreed to take tea in a friends toom, and left the proofs upon his desk and went out after locking the door. After an hour when he returned back, he found the key in the look of his room. He assumed that his man – servant, Bannister, had carelessly left the key in the lock.

When Mr. Soames entered his room and looked at his table he immediately knew that someone had rummaged among the proofs, and one of the three pages was lying on the floor and the second in the window and the third where he had left it on his table as before. He suspected that Bannister must have examined the papers but when Bannister denied it with utmost earnestness, he believed him. Bannister had been so upset with the incident that he had collapsed in a chair near the window.

Gilchrist had been practising high jump at the college grounds. After he had finished, he passed Mr. Soames window while on the way up the stairs, to his room. Because of height, he had spied the proofs on Mr. Soames table. He presumed that they were the next days question papers. Bannister had forgotten to take the keys from the lock on Mr. Soames door, when he had entered the room to enquire if Mr. Soames needed tea.

When Gilchrist saw the key at the door, he impusively used the opportunity to enter the room to see if they were indeed the question papers. After entering the room, Gilchrist had placed this spiked shoes on Mr. Soames table and the gloves on the chair near the window. He started to copy the proofs sheet by sheet. While he was copying the proofs in a hurry he had broken the pencil lead and had sharpened it. After finishing copying the first page he had dropped on the floor. He had taken the second paper to the window table to copy so that he would be able to see if anyone was approaching the room. But Mr. Soames had entered the building through the side door. When Gilchrist heard someone at the door, he had pulled the spiked shoes from the door and rushed to the bedroom and hid himself behind the curtain, behind which Mr. Soames hung his clothes.

Mr. Soames had entered the room and when he found that the proofs had been tampered, he rang the alarm. Bannister came to the room, and saw Gilchrist’s tan gloves lying on the chair beside the window. He understood everything that had happened in the room, and had flopped on the chair to hide the gloves before Mr. Soames saw them. When Mr. Soames left to contact Holmes, Bannister had let Gilchrist out of the room.

Question 21.
Explain how Holmes solved the case in your own words.
Answer:
Mr. Hilton Soames, was the tutor and lecturer at the college of St.Luke’s. On the day the crime was committed, he received the proofs of a large unseen passage of Greek translation at three o ’ clock in the afternoon. The passage would appear in the Greek language examination for the prestegious Fortescue scholarship. At four – thirty, he remembered that he had agreed to take tea in a friends toom, and left the proofs upon his desk and went out after locking the door. After an hour when he returned back, he found the key in the look of his room. He assumed that his man – servant, Bannister, had carelessly left the key in the lock.

When Mr. Soames entered his room and looked at his table he immediately knew that someone had rummaged among the proofs, and one of the three pages was lying on the floor and the second in the window and the third where he had left it on his table as before. He suspected that Bannister must have examined the papers but when Bannister denied it with utmost earnestness, he believed him. Bannister had been so upset with the incident that he had collapsed in a chair near the window.

Gilchrist had been practicing high jump at the college grounds. After he had finished, he passed Mr. Soames window while on the way up the stairs, to his room. Because of height, he had spied the proofs on Mr. Soames table. He presumed that they were the next days question papers. Bannister had forgotten to take the keys from the lock on Mr. Soames door, when he had entered the room to enquire if Mr. Soames needed tea.

When Gilchrist saw the key at the door, he impusively used the opportunity to enter the room to see if they were indeed the question papers. After entering the room, Gilchrist had placed this spiked shoes on Mr. Soames table and the gloves on the chair near the window. He started to copy the proofs sheet by sheet. While he was copying the proofs in a hurry he had broken the pencil lead and had sharpened it. After finishing copying the first page he had dropped on the floor. He had taken the second paper to the window table to copy so that he would be able to see if anyone was approaching the room. But Mr. Soames had entered the building through the side door. When Gilchrist heard someone at the door, he had pulled the spiked shoes from the door and rushed to the bedroom and hid himself behind the curtain, behind which Mr. Soames hung his clothes.

Mr. Soames had entered the room and when he found that the proofs had been tampered, he rang the alaram. Bannister came to the room, and saw Gilchrist’s tan gloves lying on the chair beside the window. He understood everything that had happened in the room, and had flopped on the chair to hide the gloves before Mr. Soames saw them. When Mr. Soames left to contact Holmes, Bannister had let Gilchrist out of the room.

Mr. Soames had left the room in a hurry to contact Mr.Homes, leaving Bannister still collapsed on the chair. Sherlock Holmes was in the university town pursuing some researches in early English charters. Mr. Soames explained every detail regarding the crime scene to Holmes. Sherlock Holmes gets interested in the case and assures Mr. Soames of his co – operation. Additionally Mr. Soames informs Holmes that he had noticed pencil sharpenings, a broken tip of lead on the table near the window. He also had noticed a deep cut about three inches long on the red leather that cover of his new study table, that he was sure was not there before the incident and a small ball of black clay with specks of sawdust on the table.

Holmes enquires Mr. Soames whether anyone had visited his room after the papers had come to him. Mr. Soames informed him that only the Indian student named Daulat Rashad come and he is not sure if the student had guessed that they were the exam proofs, because they were rolled up. He also informs Holmes that he had locked the papers, when he left his room to meet Holmes.

‘Holmes assures Mr. Soames of his help because he found the case very interesting. Holmes enquires Mr. Soames whether anyone had visited his room after the papers had come to him. Mr. Soames informed him that only the Indian student named Daulat Ras had come and he is not sure if the student had guessed that they were the exam proofs, because they were rolled up. He also informs Holmes that he had locked the papers, when he left his room to meet Holmes.

The short story ‘The Adventure of the Three Students’ is extracted from ‘The Sherlock Holmes stories’by Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859 -1930) was a Scottish writer and Physician. He is well known for his creation and chronicling the activities ofthe fictitious detective character Sherlock Holmes and his friend Dr. Watson.

In the story, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are staying in a lodge at the university town, St. Lukes, where Holmes is conducting a research into early English charters. At that time, Prof. Hilton Soames, tutor and lecturer at the college of St. Lukes brings a case to the detective, relying on his discretion. On the day the crime was committed, Mr. Soames had received the proofs of a large unseen passage of Greek translation of Thucydides’ at three O’ clock in the afternoon. The passage would appear in the Greek language examination for the prestigious Fortescue scholarship. While he was correcting the proofs, he

remembered that he had agreed to take tea at a friend’s room at four – thirty, and left the proofs upon his desk and went out after locking the door of his room. When he returned after an hour, he was amazed to see the key in the lock, he assumed that his man – serVant, had carelessly left the key in the lock.

When Mr. Soames entered his room and looked at his table, he immediately knew that someone had rummaged among the proofs, and one of the three pages was lying on the floor, and the second in the window and the third where he had left it on his table as before. He suspected that Bannister must have examined the papers but when Bannister denied it with utmost earnestness he believed him. Bannister told him that he had forgot the key in the lock, when he had come there to enquire if he needed any tea, but he did not find him there. Bannister had been so upset with the incident that he had turned white and collapsed in a chair near the window. Mr. Soames informs Mr. Holmes that Bannister, had worked for him for the past ten years and his character and conduct was above reproach. Additionally, Mr. Soames told Homes that he had identified a new scratch on his new fine leather writing table which he swears was unblemished before the incident and that he had found a small ball of black dough, or clay, with specks of sawdust on it on the table.

Mr. Soames was agitated by the scandal, the incident would create which would be detrimental to the integrity of the college and had left, Bannister still collapsed on the chair and come to Holmes for help. Holmes assures Mr. Soames of his help because he found the case very interesting. Holmes enquires Mr. Soames whether anyone

had visited his room after the papers had come to him. Mr. Soames informed him that only the Indian student named Daulat Ras had come and he is not sure if the student had guessed that they were the exam proofs, because they were rolled up. He also informs Holmes that he had locked the papers, when he left his room to meet Holmes.

Holmes and Dr. Watson return with Mr. Soames to the college. The tutor’s room was on the ground floor and the three students rooms where above, one on each storey. The stair case to the rooms above Mr. Soames room went up beside a window that overlooked into Mr. Soames room. Holmes went up the stairs to the window and attempts to look through it into Mr. Soames room. He had to stand on tiptoe and crane his neck forward to look into the room through the window.

Holmes deduces that the culprit must have entered the room through the door and not through the window as it was difficult to reach up to the window. Holmes then examines Mr. Soames’ room, and finds everything exactly as Mr. Soames had described except that, the servant, Bannister, had recovered and gone out. During further examination of the room, Holmes deduces that the culprit had tried to copy the proofs with a pencil. He had copied the first page and tossed it on the floor and while copying the second page, in a hurry, had broken his pencil lead and had sharpened it again with a blunt knife. He had carried the page over to the window table because from there he could see if anyone was approaching the room. Holmes had found bits of pencil shavings near the window. After examining the pencil shavings, Holmes, explains that the pencil was not an ordinary one. It was above the usual size, with soft lead;

the outer colour was dark blue and the marker’s name was printed in silver lettering, and the piece remaining was about an inch and half long. Holmes explained how he deduced that the remaining pencil was inch and.half long. He held out a small chip with the ‘letter ‘NN’ and a space of clear wood after them. He elaborated his explanation saying that the letters ‘NN’ must be at the end ofthe word, and that everyone knows that Johann Faber is the most common pencil maker’s name. It can be deduced that the pencil was about an inch and halflong because the maker’s name is usually printed at about 2 inches from the other end of the pencil.

Later Holmes examines the central table on which Mr. Soames had left the proofs, before going to his friend’s room. He finds the black pellets of clay and the tear on the leather as Mr. Soames had described. He says to Mr. Soames that the case is getting more interesting and asks where the door next to the table leads. Mr. Soames tells him that it leads to the bedroom. Holmes investigates the bedroom and again finds similar small pyramids of clay behind the curtain, behind which Mr. Soames hung his clothes. Holmes deduces that the culprit may have hid behind the curtain, when he heard someone opening the door to the room, before escaping, while Mr. Soames had gone to visit Holmes at the lodge.

Holmes then asks Mr. Soames about the three students who would appear for the exams, and if he suspected anyone. Mr. Soames is hesitant to admit any of the three students are culprit. He gives a detailed description ofthe characters of the three students. The student named Gilchrist occupied the room above Mr. Soames room. Gilchrist was a tall, flaxen – haired, slim young man. He was the son of the ill- famous, Sir Jabez Gilchrist who had lost his fortune at the horse – races. Gilchrist was a fine scholar and athlete, who played the Rugby team and cricket team for the college and got his blue for the hurdles and long jump. Though he was poor he was hard working and industrious and Mr. Soames predicted that he will do well in the exam.

The room above Gilchrist’s was occupied by an young Indian student named Daulat Ras. He was a silent, little hook – nosed fellow. He was a hard-working student. Although he was weak in Greek language, he studied hard and methodical in his approach to studies.

The top floor was occupied by Miles Me Laren, a brilliant young man, whenhe chose to study hard. He was one of the brightest students of the university. But he was wayward, corrupt, immoral and unprincipled. He was nearly expelled from the college over a card scandal in his first year. He was a moody fellow and used abusive language when he was in a foul mood. Mr. Soames informed Holmes that Miles Me Laren had been lazy through the whole term and appeared not to have studied for the exam and he would be afraid to take up the exams.

Later, Holmes , examined Bannister. Bannister was a loyal servant of Mr. Soames and had worked for him for the past ten years. Mr. Soames never had any doubts about his honesty. Bannister was a little, white-faced, clean-shaven, grizzly-haired man of fifty. He had plump face. He appeared nervous and was restless. He admits that he had not touched the proofs and that he had the tea-tray in his hands and left the key in lock and forgot about it.

When Holmes particularly asked him why he chose to sit on that chair near the window he confided that it didn’t matter to him where he sat. when he felt faint, when he heard the news of the theft. He also tells Holmes that he does not suspect any of the three students. As a parting shot, Holmes asked Bannister if he mentioned the tampering of the proofs to any of the three students, Bannister confidently told that he definitely had not mentioned it to them.

Holmes intended to follow the clue offered by the pencil shavings, and also judge the height of the three students. So he asked Mr. Soames to take him to the rooms of each of the three students. He warns Mr. Soames not to mention any names. He had deduced that only the three students who had taken the Greek exam would benefit by cheating in the exam. So in order to confirm who had indeed tried to copy the exam proofs. He had to find the pencil used to copy the proof and to whom it belonged to. So he visited each student in their rooms.

Holmes was first taken to Gilchrist’s room. Holmes saw that Gilchrist was a tall young man. There were some really curious pieces of mediaeval domestic architecture within the room. Holmes pretended to be charmed with one of them, that he insisted on drawing it on his note – book and broke his pencil lead. He borrowed one from Gilchrist and later borrowed a knife to sharpen his own pencil. .

Later he was taken to the Indian student, Daulat Ras’ room. He made the presentation of studying the architecture of the room in the same way as he had done in Gilchrist’s room.

Holmes was then taken to Miles Me Laren’s room. But the student abused them in a torrent of bad language and refused to open the door.
Later Holmes went to the town market with the pencil chips and asked ifhe could buy one of a similar pencil from the stationers. He was informed that such a pencil was not stocked but could be procured on demand. Holmes then returned to the college and winds up his investigation.

‘ The next morning at eight O’ clock Holmes tells Dr. Watson that he had solved the case. Holmes had got up early at six in the morning and collected three little clay pyramids, identical to the one’s found in Mr. Soames room. Holmes and Dr. Watson go to Prof. Soames room and find him in a state of pitiable agitation. Holmes calms him down and reassures him that the exams could be conducted as scheduled, because he had found out the culprit. But Holmes proposes a private court – martial, so that the matter can be kept a secret to avoid any scandal.

Holmes then deliberately made seating arrangements in Mr. Soames room in such a way so that, Bannister would be compelled to sit on the same chair by the window as he did the day before. They call Bannister to the room and ask him to confess the truth. Bannister vehemently denies any role in the crime. Holmes accuses Bannister, that on the previous day when he was summoned by Mr. Soames, (when he discovered the crime) Bannister had collapsed into that chair to hide some object that would have revealed the identity of the culprit. And

when Mr. Soames had left the room to seek help, he had let out the culprit who was hiding in the bedroom. Bannister continues to deny everything and so Gilchrist is summoned from his room, and Holmes accuses Gilchrist of being guilty. Gilchrist thinks that Bannister had confessed everything and looks at him with horror and reproach. But Bannister protests with Gilchrist that he had never said one word about the crime.

Holmes points out to Gilchrist that he was in a hopeless position and asks him to confess everything. Gilchrist is overcome by emotion of starts to cry pitiably.

Holmes then recounts the findings of his investigation. Holmes had concluded that the guilty person had accidently found out the papers on Mr. Soames table were the exam proofs, and only a tall man could have looked into the room’s window to observe the papers. And so he had visited each student to judge their height The accidental leaving of the key in the lock tempted the culprit to commit the crime. Gilchrist was the tallest of the three students and when he came to know that Gilchrist was a long jumper with the additional evidence of the claypyrimads, he was sure that Gilchrist was the culprit. Holmes then narrates how the incident had actually happened.

The previous day Gilchrist had been practising high jump at the college grounds. After he had finished, he passed Mr. Soames window while on the way up the stairs to his room. Because ofhis height, he had spied the proofs on Mr. Soames table. He presumed that they were the next days’ question papers. Bannister had forgotten to take the keys from the lock on Mr. Soames door, when he had entered the room to enquire ifMr. Soames needed tea.

When Gilchrist saw the key at the door, he impulsively used the opportunity to enter the room to see if they were indeed the question papers. After entering the room, Gilchrist had placed the spiked shoes on Mr. Soames table and the gloves on the chair near the window. While he was copying the proofs in a hurry he had broken the pencil lead and had sharpened it. After finishing copying the first page he had dropped it on the floor. He had taken the second paper to the window table to copy so that he would be able to see if anyone was approaching the room. But Mr. Soames had entered the building through the side door. When Gilchrist heard someone at the door, he had pulled the spiked shoes from the door and rushed to the bedroom and hid behind the curtain, behind which Mr. Soames hung his clothes.

Mr. Soames had entered the room and when he found that the proofs had been tampered, he rang the alarm. Bannister came to the room, and saw Gilchrist’s tan gloves lying on the chair beside the window. He understood everything that had happened in the room, and had flopped on the chair to hide the gloves before Mr.Soames saw them. When Mr.Soames left to contact Holmes, Bannister had let Gilchrist out of the room.

Gilchrist acknowledges all that Holmes had narrated to be true. Gilchrist then reveals that he had in his possession a letter of confession, addressed to Mr. Soames, which he had written even before he was proved guilty. He had written ‘I have determined not to go for the examination, I have been offered a commission in the Rhodesian Police, and I am going out to South Africa at once’. Gilchrist says that he had been advised by Bannister not to take up the exam and set him on the right path. Bannister then admits that he had been in the service of young Gilchrist’s father,Mr. Jabez Gilchrist, and had looked after young Gilchrist in his childhood days. When Jabez Gilchrist had lost all his fortune at the horse – races, he had joined the service of Mr. Soames, ten years ago. But he was loyal to his former master and tried to save young Gilchrist from scandal and shame. Holmes ends the case, wishing young Gilchrist all the best in the future and goes to have breakfast.

Question 22.
Were you surprised to find out who the culprit really was?What stereotypes are reinforced or supported by the story? What stereotypes does the story challenge?
Answer:
Yes, certainly I was surprised that sportive and hard-working student as Gilchrist was the real culprit. The stereotype which is reinforced in the story is that of Bannister. It is natural for a reader to guess that the real culprit must be Bannister, because he acted straingely until the end of the investigatioa Although Bannister helped Gilchirst by involving himself in the crime, it is heartening to know at the end, that Bannister had no ulterior motives but only to save the university and the son ofhis former employer from scandal and shame.

But the story ‘The adventure of the three students’ does challenge the usual stereotypes projected in most crime stories. Bannister is a servant who has looked after Mr. Soames’room for the past ten years. He is a “little, whilefaced, clean shaven, grizzy haired fellow of fifty”. His honesty, according to Mr. Soames, is absolutely above suspicion. As soon as he hears the news of the cheating attempt, he flops down on a chair and nearly fainted, although he denied his involvement in the crime.

Though Holmes believes that Bannister is a throughly honest man, he continues to question him. Bannister is perturbed by all this questioning and overcome by guilt, finally breaks down and confesses his involvement in the crime. We come to know later, that Bannister was employed in the house of Mr. Jabez Gilchirst, the father of young Gilchrist. He had looked after young Gilchrist during his childhood days. When Jabez Gilchrist had lost his fortune at horse – races, Bannister had joined the service of Mr. Hilton Soames. Being loyal to his former employer; Bannister had tried to save young Gilchrist of the scandal and shame.

Another stereotype that is challenged in the story is that of young Gilchrist. Gilchrist was a tall, flaxen – haired, slim young man. He was the son of the notorious Sir Jabez Gilchrist who had lost his fortune at horse – races. Gilchrist was a fine scholar and athlete who played the Rugby team and cricket team for the college and got his Blue for the hurdles and the long jump. Though he was poor, he was hard working and industrious. Being an athlete he was very tall young man. But appearances are deceptive. Most readers will be surprised that young Gilchrist turns out to be the culprit. Gilchrist is at ease and charming when he was being questioned by Holmes, But when Holmes produces enough evidence of his mis – deed, he breaks down and confesses to the crime.

Gilchrist had committed the crime on an impulse of curiosity. Because of his height, he spied the proofs on Mr. Soames table accidently. But no harm would have been done if Bannister had not been careless enough to leave the keys to Mr. Soames room at the door. When Gilchrist saw the keys at the door a sudden impulse came over him to enter and see if they were indeed the proofs and attempted to copy them. Later he confesses that he was shocked by his disgraceful act and had decided to not take up the exam, and leave immediately to a job offered by the Rhodesian police.

Another stereotype Jhat is challenged ip’the story is that of the character of the Indian student Daulat Ras. He is one the three suspects. Ras is described as quiet, inscrutable fellow and not a bad student, but he is weak in Greek. This makes him a likely suspect. But Holmes rules him out on the basis of his physical appearance. Another likely suspect is the character of Miles Me Laren. Mr. Soames describes him as a brilliant young man, when he chose to study hard. He was one ofthe brightest intellects ofthe university. But he was wayward, disspiated and unprincipled. He was nearly expelled from the college over a card scandal in his first year. He was a moody fellow and used abusive language when he was in foal mood. He had been idling all that term, and he must look forward with dread to the examination. All this leads the reader to strongly suspect him. he does not open his door when Holmes is taken to his room for investigation. He abused them in bad language from inside saying that he had to prepare for the Greek exam, the next day and he had no time to talk to anyone.

Miles McLaren appears to be the most likely suspect in the cheating case. But as it is the most obvious suspect is never the culprit. Holmes dismisses him as a suspect as no evidence pointed at him. Moreover, Mr. Soames tells Holmes that he was not as tall as Gilchrist. Hence Holmes does not give much importance to him as a suspect.

LANGUAGE ACTIVITY

QUESTION FORMS

Exercise

Ex: Did / the police / the thieves (catch)
Questions: Did the police catch the thieves?
Answer: Yes / No

Question 1.
Have / Lucy and Danny / from their holiday? (come back)
Answer:
Have Lucy and Danny come back from their holiday?

Question 2.
Is / Rani / today? (working)
Answer:
Is Rani working today.

Question 3.
Does / he / piano? (play)
Answer:
Does he play the piano?

Question 4.
Shall  / I / with you? (come)
Answer:
Shall I come with you?

Question 5.
Did / Shahjahan/ TajMahal? (build)
Answer:
Did Shahjahan build TajMahal?

Question 6.
Would / you / drink tea? (like to)
Answer:
Would you like to drink tea?

Question 7.
Did / he / assignment / on time? (submit)
Answer:
Did he submit the assignment on time?

Question 8.
Can / we / a party next week? (throw)
Answer:
Can we throw a party next week?

Question 9.
Were / they / in rains? (caught)
Answer:
Were they caught in rains?

Question 10.
Was / she / when / asked not to speak? (annoyed)
Answer:
Was she annoyed when asked not to speak”

Question 11.
Will you be ready soon? / Do you will be ready soon?
Answer:
Will you be ready soon?

Question 12.
Live you in Bangalore? / Do you live in Bangalore? / Are you live in Bangalore?
Answer:
Do you live in Bangalore?

Question 13.
Must you go now? / Must you go now?
Answer:
Must you go now?

Question 14.
Can she dance? / Does she can dance?
Answer:
Can she dance?

Question 15.
Is Nancy hiring a cab? / Does Nancy hiring a cab? / Is Nancy hire a cab?
Answer:
Is Nancy hiring a cab?

Question 16.
Did you say something? / Did you said something? / Did you say something?
Answer:
Did you say something?

Question 17.
Do you have been to Ooty? / Have you been to Ooty?
Answer:
Have you been to Ooty?

Question 18.
Do you speak Tamil? / Speak you Tamil? / Are you speak Tamil?
Answer:
Do you speak Tamil?

Question 19.
Has the film started? / Started film?
Answer:
Has the film started?

Question 20.
Were they travelling by train? / train travel were they?
Answer:
Were they travelling by train?

Example:
You reading are
Answer:
Are you reading? Yes / No

Question 21.
Tired is she very
Answer:
Is she very tired? Yes / No

Question 22.
He at his home is
Answer:
Is he at home? Yes/No

Question 23.
My mother will arrive by train
Answer:
Will my mother arrive by train? Yes / No

Question 24.
Go must you now
Answer:
Must you go now? Yes / No

Question 25.
German language they speak can
Answer:
Can you speak the German language? Yes / No.

Complete the dialogue with these words: are, do, does, has, have, is.

Vishnu: Are you going to computer class today?
Rajesh: No, I am not going to computer class today.
Vishnu: Is it a useful course?
Rajesh: Yes, have you ever been to such a type of course?
Vishnu: No, I haven’t. Does your company sponsor your course?
Rajesh: Yes.
Vishnu: Has it helped you in your career growth?
Rajesh: Of course, yes. Do you want to join that course?
Vishnu: Yes.

‘Wh ’ Questions

Exercise

I. Complete the following conversation by using appropriate ‘Wh ’ question forms (Use all the 9 ‘Wh ’ question forms).

1. Conversation between two friends.

Raj: Hey! Dev, How are you?
Dev: Hi! I am fine. I didn’t see you for so many days.
Raj: I had taken a short break from my work.
Dev: Sounds good. What did you do during the break?
Raj: I went on a vacation.
Dev: That’s fantastic. Where did you go?
Raj: I went to Coorg.
Dev: How was the weather there?
Raj: The weather was good and we enjoyed a lot.
Dev: With whom did you go?
Raj: I went with my family.
Dev: Which vehicle did you hire to go to Coorg?
Raj: I had hired a car from one of my friends.
Dev: Why did you decide to go to Coorg?
Raj: 1 decided to go to Coorg because I like hill stations.
Dev: Which is your favourite holiday destination?
Raj: Coorg, Of course.

II. Fill in the blanks with appropriate ‘Wh’ – question

Who When How Which Whom What Whose Why Where

  1. Where is your house?
  2. Who are you?
  3. What are you doing?
  4. When / Where / Why have you joined B.Sc. Course?
  5. When will the results be out?
  6. Where is your car?
  7. Whom are you waiting for?
  8. Whose bike is this?
  9. How much did you pay for this shoe?

III. Make questions to get the underlined words as answers.

Example:
a) Johnny sat on the bench – Where did Johnny sit?
b) Johnny sat on the bench – Who sat on the bench?
1.
a) Raj purchased a car – Who purchased a car?
b) Raj purchased a carWhat did Raj purchase?

2.
a) Vikas is coming to India this ChristmasWhen is Vikas coming to India?
b) Vikas is coming to India this Christmas – Who is coming to India this Christmas

3.
a) Kiran solved the problem quickly – Who solved the question quickly?
b) Kiran solved the problem quicklyHow did Kiran solve the problem?

4.
a) Shivani bought a pink colour dress – Which colour dress did Shivani buy?
b) Shivani bought a pink colour dress – Who bought a pink dress?

5.
a) Shashi’s parents are going to Dubai next week – Where are Shashi’s parents going next week?
b) Shashi’s parents are going to Dubai next weekWhen are Shashi’s parents going to Dubai?

6.
a) My cousins go out for lunch on Sundays – Why do your cousins go out on Sundays?
b) My cousins go out for lunch on SundaysWhen do your cousins go out for lunch?

7.
a) The boys are hiding under their grandfather’s bed –  Where are the boys hiding?
b) The boys are hiding under their grandfather’s bed –  Who are hiding under their grandfather’s bed?

8.
a) Amy’s flight got delayed because of bad weather – Whose flight got delayed because of bad weather?
b) Amy’s flight got delayed because of bad weatherWhy did Amy’s flight get delayed?

IV. Select the preposition from the box and fill in the blanks. about – at – for – from – in

  1. What subjects are you interested in?
  2. What are you talking about?
  3. Where does he come from?
  4. Whom are you waiting for?
  5. What are you looking at?

V. Fill up the blanks :

1. What did you do yesterday
What / Where / When
2. Where are the kids?
When / Where / Why
3. When is his marriage?
Whose / Whom / When
4. How was the movie?
How / Why / When
5. Who is your favourite actor?
How / Who / When
6. Why are you upset?
When / Where / Why
7. Whose car is parked in no parking zone?
Where / Whom / Whose
8. Whom did she meet?
What / Why / Whom
9. Which is your book?
Why / Which / When

QUESTION TAGS

Exercise

I. Match the following statements with appropriate Question tags.

A B
1. Her mother is a Doctor, Won’t they?
2. The birds are flying doesn’t she?
3. The boys will be attending the class, didn’t she?
4. The students have special classes, isn’t she?
5. The girls weren’t doing anything, aren’t they?
6. The employees haven’t got a salary hike, does it?
7. It doesn’t rain much here, haven’t they?
8. She hates travelling, were they?
9. Susy worked hard, Don’t they?
10. My cousins watch movies every Sunday, Have they?

Answer:

A B
1. Her mother is a Doctor, isn’t she?
2. The birds are flying, aren’t they?
3. The boys will be attending the class, Won’t they?
4. The students have special classes, haven’t they?
5. The girls weren’t doing anything, were they?
6. The employees haven’t got a salary hike, Have they?
7. It doesn’t rain much here, does it?
8. She hates travelling, doesn’t she?
9. Susy worked hard, didn’t she?
10. My cousins watch movies every Sunday, Haven’t they?

II Add Question tags to the following statements.

  1. Devyani wasn’t at home when I called her up, was she?
  2. Bhaskar will be late, won’t he?
  3. The guests have arrived on time, haven’t they?
  4. There is a Church in that street, isn’t it?
  5. Children do not want to go out, do they?
  6. Mohan doesn’t eat properly, does he?
  7. Your sisters are married, aren’t they?
  8. Jahnavi’s mother cooks well, doesn’t she?
  9. Gopi and Hari broke the glass, didn’t they?
  10. The cows were grazing, weren’t they?

III. Choose the correct option. 
Question 1.
a) I think he is from India, aren’t he?
b) I think he is from India, isn’t he?
Answer:
b

Question2.
a) They haven’t come yet, have they?
b) They haven’t come yet, haven’t they?
Answer:
a

Question 3.
a) The boy drank milk, doesn’t he?
b) The boy drank milk, didn’t he?
Answer:
b

Question 4.
a) Bahubali made a huge profit, don’t it?
b) Bahubali made a huge profit, didn’t it?
Answer:
b

Question 5.
a) The computer doesn’t work properly, does it?
b) The computer doesn’t work properly, doesn’t it?
Answer:
a

IV. Choose the correct Question tag.

Question 1.
Jaipur is in Rajasthan, ___________________
(a) hasn’t it?
(b) isn’t it?
(c) wasn’t it?
Answer:
(b) isn’t it?

Question 2.
Children want to learn English _______________
(a) don’t they?
(b) didn’t they?
(c) doesn’t they?
Answer:
(a) don’t they?

Question 3.
You went to Switzerland last year ______________
(a) don’t you?
(b) doesn’t you?
(c) didn’t you?
Answer:
(c) didn’t you?

Question 4.
Gopal hasn’t passed the exams yet ______________
(a) has he?
(b) had he?
(c) did he?
Answer:
(a) has he?

Question 5.
Dev was angry with his friend _____________
(a) is he?
(b) hasn’t he?
(c) wasn’t he?
Answer:
(c) wasn’t he?

English Summary

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