The Escape Summary Notes

The Escape About the Author

Narayan Shyam (1922-1989) is an exemplary Sindhi poet who pioneered Sindhi poetry and popularized it. He introduced western forms as well as classical forms like doha, ghazal, bait and vai in his poetry. 11 collections of poetry including Waria Bhario Paland have been appreciated by the reading public.

He was awarded the Sahitya Akademi Award in 1970. This poem The Escape is a special tribute to the poetic talent which subtly explains the futility and needlessness of enmity and hatred. This is translated from Sindhi by Param Abhichandani.

The Escape Summary

Yes,
My foe he was!
Where did he come from?
He stood by my side And like this!
I gnashed my teeth,
Bit my lips,
And for a moment –
Ah! With saucy spearing eyes,
Into his face I looked,
And then,
Turned away my face.
Move he didn’t, however.
Peremptorily,
There he stood!
And said to me,
“One day,
When this age of animosity will face away,
And when we shall have spent the last bullet
Or even if the bullets remain
We shall not load them;
For our injured imbecile hands
Will not move to pick them
Then, we may perhaps ask –
What were we fighting for?
And we may feel helpless
To find any reason therefor.
That we were hating each other
Will lapse into a history”
He stood in expectation
To hear from me But…
I escaped –
Had I waited there any longer,
Certainly I would have embraced him.

The poem ‘Escape’ is by the contemporary poet Narayan Shyam, who writes in Sindhi. The poem is translated from Sindhi to English by Param Abhichandani.

The poem is addressed to an enemy. The speaker hates his antagonist. One day his foe comes and stands beside him. The speaker does not know from where his enemy had come. The speaker looks at him furiously with his eyes spewing piercing anger.

He gnashes his teeth and bites his lips, and then looks away. The enemy is undaunted and didn’t try to move away but stood their authoritatively and told the speaker that one day the hostility between them would end, when they shall have spent the last bullet.

Even if they still have some bullets, they will strongly resolve not to load them onto the guns, with their stupid injured hands nor make any move to pick them up. When both are at peace they would be able to discuss why they were after all fighting each other. They may then be able to .realize their helplessness to find any reason for the animosity between them.

Their animosity and hatred would dissolve into peace and would lapse into history, i.e., it would be only remembered in the history books. The speaker’s enemy stood there expecting an answer but the speaker was lost for words and quietly slipped away or rather escaped from there without giving an explanation.

Later the poet admits that if he had the fearlessness to face the enemy’s jibe he would have certainly embraced him joyfully. The poem depicts the futility and needlessness of enmity and hatred.

The Escape Glossary

  • Foe : enemy
  • Gnash : to grind teeth in anger or in pain
  • Spearing : piercing, penetrating
  • Peremptorily: stubborn, commanding
  • Animosity : enmity
  • Imbecile : weak, lacking strength

The Escape Questions And Answers

I. Answer the following questions in one or two sentences:

Question 1.
Who is the speaker addressing?
Answer:
The speaker is addressing his enemy.

Question 2.
Mention any two expressions which denote anger and ill will.
Answer:
(a) “I gnashed my teeth,
Bit my lips,

(b) Ah! with saucy spearing eyes,
Into his face I looked

Question 3.
Who was the first to express anger between the speaker and his enemy?
Answer:
The poet-speaker was the first to express anger towards his enemy.

Question 4.
The foe was meek and timid. TRUE / FALSE
Answer:
False

Question 5.
What did the foe tell the speaker about their future status of rivalry?
Answer:
The foe told the poet that, eventually the age of animosity be-tween them will end, and the guns will go silent if they remain un-loaded with the bullets because their injured and weak hands will not make a move to pick up the bullets. In that hour of peace and solitude they might ask each other. What they were fighting each other for and feel helpless because they might not find any reasons for their animosity.

Question 6.
According to the foe, What ‘will lapse into a history’?
Answer:
‘That they were hating each other’ will lapse into history.

Question 7.
Why did the speaker escape from the scene?
Answer:
The speaker had no answers to his foe’s question, ‘What were we fighting for?’, so he escaped from the scene.

Question 8.
Is the speaker afraid to face his foe?
Answer:
The speaker was actually ashamed to face his foe.

II. Answer the following questions in 80 – 100 words:

Question 1.
Explain the opening of the poem and the expressions on the face of the speaker.
Answer:
The speaker hates his antagonist. One day his foe comes and stands beside him. The speaker does not know from where his enemy had come. The speaker looks at him furiously with his eyes spewing piercing anger. He gnashes his teeth and bites his lips, and then looks away.

Question 2.
How different was the reaction of the enemy to that of the speaker’s?
Answer:
The enemy is undaunted and didn’t try to move away but stood their authoritatively and told the speaker that one day the hostility between them would end, when they shall have spent the last bullet. Even if they still have some bullets, they will strongly resolve not to load them onto the guns, with their stupid injured hands nor make any move to pick them up. When both are at peace they would be able to discuss why they were after all fighting each other.

They may then be able to realize their helplessness to find any reason for the animosity between them. Their animosity and hatred would dissolve into peace and would lapse into history, i.e., it would be only remembered in the history books.

Question 3.
What does the ending of the poem convey?
Answer:
At the end of the poem it is understood that the speaker had realized the futility and needlessness of enimity and hatred between him and his foe. But the speaker was adamant and did not want to admit that there was no reason for the needless enmity between them. Hence he could not answer his foe’s question, ‘What were we fighting for?” and like a coward unable to face his enemy, the speaker slipped away or rather escaped for him.

The speaker is overcome with joy to hear his enemy offering a truce of peace between them and feels that if he hadn’t run away from there he would have hugged his enemy joyfully for his offer of ending the animosity between them.

III. Answer the following questions in 200 – 250 words :

Question 1.
Narayan Shyam subtly brings out the futility of animosity between two individuals or two factions in the poem. Explain.
Answer:
In the poem ‘Escape’ by poet Narayan Shyam subtly brings out the futility of animosity between two individuals or two factions in the poem. The poem is addressed to an enemy. The speaker hates his antagonist. One day his foe comes and stands beside him. The speaker does not know from where his enemy had come. The speaker looks at him furiously with his eyes spewing piercing anger.

He gnashes his teeth and bites his lips, and then looks away. The enemy is undaunted and didn’t try to move away but stood their authoritatively and told the speaker that one day the hostility between them would end, when they shall have spent the last bullet.

Even if they still have some bullets, they will strongly resolve not to load them onto the guns, with their stupid injured hands nor make any move to pick them up. When both are at peace they would be able to discuss why they were after all fighting each other. They may then be able to realize their helplessness to find any reason for the animosity between them.

overcome with joy to hear his enemy offering a truce of peace between them and feels that if he hadn’t run away from there he would have hugged his enemy joyfully for his offer of ending the animosity between them.

III. Answer the following questions in 200 – 250 words :

Question 1.
Narayan Shyam subtly brings out the futility of animosity between two individuals or two factions in the poem. Explain.
Answer:
In the poem ‘Escape’ by poet Narayan Shyam subtly brings out the futility of animosity between two individuals or two factions in the poem. The poem is addressed to an enemy. The speaker hates his antagonist. One day his foe comes and stands beside him. The speaker does not know from where his enemy had come. The speaker looks at him furiously with his eyes spewing piercing anger.

He gnashes his teeth and bites his lips, and then looks away. The enemy is undaunted and didn’t try to move away but stood their authoritatively and told the speaker that one day the hostility between them would end, when they shall have spent the last bullet.

Even if they still have some bullets, they will strongly resolve not to load them onto the guns, with their stupid injured hands nor make any move to pick them up. When both are at peace they would be able to discuss why they were after all fighting each other. They may then be able to realize their helplessness to find any reason for the animosity between them.

Their animosity and hatred would dissolve into peace and would lapse into history, i.e., it would be only remembered in the history books. The speaker’s enemy stood there expecting an answer but the speaker was lost for words and quietly slipped away or rather escaped from there without giving an explanation.

Later the poet admits that if he had the fearlessness to face the enemy’s jibe he would have certainly embraced him joyfully. The poem depicts the futility and needlessness of enmity and hatred.

Question 2.
Human relations are being poisoned by petty moments of anger and hatred which destroy the longevity of the bonding. Explain with reference to the poem.
Answer:
It is true that human relations are being poisoned by petty moments of anger and hatred which destroy the longevity of the bonding. In the poem ‘Escape’ by poet Narayan Shyam subtly brings out the futility of animosity between two individuals or two factions in the poem.

The poem is addressed to an enemy. The speaker hates his antagonist. One day his foe comes and stands beside him. The speaker does not know from where his enemy had come. The speaker looks at him furiously with his eyes spewing piercing anger. He gnashes his teeth and bites his lips, and then looks away. The enemy is undaunted and didn’t try to move away but stood their authoritatively and told the speaker that one day the hostility between them would end, when they shall have spent the last bullet.

Even if they still have some bullets, they will strongly resolve not to load them onto the guns, with their stupid injured hands nor make any move to pick them up. When both are at peace they would be able to discuss why they were after all fighting each other. They may then be able to realize their helplessness to find any reason for the animosity between them.

Their animosity and hatred would dissolve into peace and would lapse into history, i.e., it would be only remembered in the history books. The speaker’s enemy stood there expecting an answer but the speaker was lost for words and quietly slipped away or rather escaped from there without giving an explanation.

Later the poet admits that if he had the fearlessness to face the enemy’s jibe he would have certainly embraced him joyfully. The poem depicts the futility and needlessness of enmity and hatred.

Question 3.
The biggest enemy of man is his mind and his perception of people around him. Does ‘The Escape’ endorse this statement? Substantiate.
Answer:
It has been proved that the biggest enemy of man is his mind and his preception of people around him.

It is true that human relations are being poisoned by petty moments of anger and hatred which destroy the longevity of the bonding. In the poem ‘Escape’ by poet Narayan Shyam subtly brings out the futility of animosity between two individuals or two factions in the poem.

The poem is addressed to an enemy. The speaker hates his antagonist. One day his foe comes and stands beside him. The speaker does not know from where his enemy had come. The speaker looks at him furiously with his eyes spewing piercing anger.

He gnashes his teeth and bites his lips, and then looks away. The enemy is undaunted and didn’t try to move away but stood their authoritatively and told the speaker that one day the hostility between them would end, when they shall have spent the last bullet.

Even if they still have some bullets, they will strongly resolve not to load them onto the guns, with their stupid injured hands nor make any move to pick them up. When both are at peace they would be able to discuss why they were after all fighting each other. They may then be able to realize their helplessness to find any reason for the animosity between them.

Their animosity and hatred would dissolve into peace and would lapse into history, i.e., it would be only remembered in the history books. The speaker’s enemy stood there expecting an answer but the speaker was lost for words and quietly slipped away or rather escaped from there without giving an explanation.

Later the poet admits that if he had the fearlessness to face the enemy’s jibe he would have certainly embraced him joyfully. The poem depicts the futility and needlessness of enmity and hatred.

English Summary

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