The Golden Dream Summary Notes

The Golden Dream Author

He was a prominent Kannada writer, novelist, photographer, publisher, painter, naturalist, and environmentalist. He made a great impression in the “Navya” period of Kannada Literature by initiating the Bandaaya (“Protest Literature”) with his short-story collection, Abachoorina Post Offisu. He is the son of ‘Rashtrakavi Kuvempu’.

In the early stages of his writing career, Tejaswi wrote poems but later concentrated on short stories, novels, and essays. He has also translated and adapted a wide range of works which include science, history, mysterious natural cosmic phenomena, etc. Poornachandra Tejaswi has a distinguished style of writing which has signaled a new era in Kannada Literature. He is one of the most widely read writers in Kannada and his works have been translated into many Indian and foreign languages. Many of his works have been adapted to theatre and made into movies. His works depict the life and landscape of the Malnad region. The humorous style adopted in his writings and the clarity and insights they provide to a number of things like the economy, civilization, people, nature, animal world, environmental issues are inimitable and have made a strong impression on the minds of the readers.

This short story is a translation of ‘Suvarna Swapna’ from ‘Paakakrantii’ and has been translated from Kannada by Bageshree. The story of The Golden Dream depicts the innocence, wonder, imagination, and curiosity of childhood and the strange, wonderful ways of nature.

The Golden Dream Summary

The given short story ‘The Golden Dream’ is the translation of the Kannada short story ‘ Suvarna Swapna’ by the eminent Kannada writer, novelist, photographer, publisher, painter, naturalist and environmentalist, Kuppalli Puttappa Pooma Chandra Tejaswi (1938-2007) It is translated from Kannada into English by Bageshree.

The Short story ‘The Golden Dream’ depicts the innocence, wonder, imagination and curiosity of childhood and the strange, wonderful ways of nature. It is extracted from his collection of short stories ‘PaakaKrantii’.

Tejaswi begins the story on a philosophical note “It is perhaps a law of providence that certain ailments should visit everyone at certain points of their lives”. He sets a premise for the protoganist of the story, Rameshas strange behaviour. The people ofHatthur (a tiny village in the Western Ghats ofKamataka) found Ramesha’s strange behaviour, of late, because he was normal until recently. The people of Hatthur were a somewhat a detached lot. They seemed to have overcome desire, anger, pride jealousyand all the rest of the vices. The writer wonders how they had managed to have children.

The people gossiped about Ramesha’s strange behaviour. Some people noticed that he spent most of his time at the bus stand. They thought that he was suffering from a strange disease. Some felt that some dirty bitch had cast of magic spell in him. Others protested that he was still a young boy to say that he is mad after girls. Some others felt sad for his mother. Ramesha’s father was dead and his mother had brought him up. They had a few acres of land in Hatthur and eked a living from the land.

The location and population of Hatthur was the main cause for all problems that the people of Hatthur suffered.

Hatthur was located on a small hill lock surrounded by thick forest and flanked by two streams on either side. The village had not even been marked on government maps. There ware no roads leading to the village. People of the village did not pay taxes nor the government would sanction even a paltry coin for the village in its budget, since the village had only three or four houses, politics was ruled out.

If one had to go to Hatthur he had to get down on the Manglore Highway and walk up the hill-range and then down beyond the hills or reach it. The author thinks the village got its name ‘Hatthur’ because one had to go up the hill -lock and down the other side to reach it. ‘Hatthu’ in Kannada means ‘climb’, ‘uru’ means ‘village’.

The ‘MandalPanchayat bus-stand’ at which Ramesha waited everyday to go to school was located on a deserted stretch of the Mangalore Highway with thick forests on either side one could only identify that the place was.a bus – stop of observing a mud – road leading somewhere into the forest.
Buses rarely stopped there. Only a couple of shuttle buses went round all the villages. The passengers who got down at that bus stop would be terrified at the sight of Ramesha as if he were a wildanimal.

The author tells us that the bus- stop was a strange place because it was always deserted. If one happened to be timid, he would never wait at the bus – stop for more than ten minutes since the place was located deep in the western ghats. It was always cloudy and foggy. The vehicles had a tough time negotiating along the highway even in day- time with their headlights switched on.

If a traveller waiting at the bus stop, was desperate to reach home, and tried to flag down a passing vehicle, the drivers who speed away infear, as though they had seen a Chambal valley dacoit. The deserted place was a haven for criminals. Smugglers from Kerala and Mangalore used the road to smuggle sandal wood. Muderers would use the river flowing down the valley to dump dead bodies or drop them down the steep hillside. Several bones and skeletons were found when the army came in to search a helicopter which had crashed in the valley after taking off from Bengaluru.

One day as usual Ramesha was waiting for the bus to arrive. He heard someone talking behind him. When he looked back he was surprised to see some strange looking people with fed mustaches and hair, wearing turbans, coming down the Hatthur road. They had some donkeys, which carried loads. He thought that they were nomadic tribal. They spoke in Hindi. They stopped on the other side of the road. They sat beside a huge rock and talked among themselves. After sometime the group dispersed and walked away, each a furlong apart from the other.

Ramesha had never seen them before in the village and wondered future they had come from they were surely strangers as anyone would have noticed them in the village. He was curious because the path through the forest lead only to Hatthur. He wondered if it also led to some other mysterious places in the thick forest.

Ramesh stood at the bus – stop in disbelief unconsciously staring at the huge rock. There was no one around except for a couple of dogs and a few people. He wasn’t scared as was natural for people from Hatthur. People who got scared easily didn’t survive there.

Just theft, a woman who was standing near the rock came straight towards him and stared at him for a long time. She spoke to him in Hindi and asked him a lot of questions. Ramesha could not understand her and stood blinking at her. When she saw that Ramesha could not understand her, she asked him through gestures if the would like her to remove his ear wax. Ramesha refused impatiently, swaging his head sideways. She forcibly took his hand and began telling his fortune. Ramesha was clueless as he didn’t understand her. Later she took out abottle ofoilfromher bag and started massaging his lead. The oil had a strange fragrance, she touched him all over on the pretext of messaging. He wondered if it were a dream or reality.

At that time, the bus arrived. Ramesha hurriedly got into the bus. He looked back to see the strange woman standing at the bus – stand with a bag slung over her shoulders, beside her two mongrels (dogs). This incident did not have any special significance in Ramesha’s life nor was it the reason for his strange behaviour. After a few weeks he had forgotten the incident. But the writer wonders if it was the ambience (atmosphere) of the bus – stand, the reason for his strange behaviour.

Another day, as Ramesha stood at the bus – stop, he started staring at the huge boulder. He imagined that it looked like the back of an elephant. It was as if a hidden faculty his mind had come alive. Once he learnt the method or rejecting the cause and effect relationship of the physical world, the boulder opposite slowly started breathing and he could see it heaving. In the fog – enveloped magical world, the trees started dancing to the tune of Ramesh’s imagination as if they were made of rubber. Like a ring master, he conducted their dancing.

Suddenly he thought he heard the bus approaching and stopped his dreaming and got ready to stop the bus. It was not the bus but an Ambassador car with tinted glass. He waved at it to stop but it sped away. He had heard that smugglers always had tinted glass on their windows. He wondered if the car’s dicky was full of gold biscuits. Within minutes of Ramesha’s mastering of his new art of dreaming, another car come along chasing the first car. The people in the first car threw sacks of gold into the river SQine sacks fell on the bank.

Ramesha ran to the river bank and collected a bag of gold biscuits. Later he started wondering what to do with them and what they were worth in rupees. He thought of taking them home and get some jewelers made for his mother. But he realized that it would be a problem to explain the goldsmith how he got the gold biscuits. He thought of bribing the goldsmith by giving him a share of the gold. He realized that if the poor get gold, it means trouble.

As he stood there lost in his predicament, he wasn’t even aware that he had missed the bus. He stood there wondering why the bus was late that day. Again he started staring at the huge rock. He imagined that the rock resembled the cursed Ahalya (of Ramayana) chanting the name of Lord Rama. When Lord Rama had stepped on the rock Ahalya was freed from the curse and emerged from the rock breaking it. Sometimes Ahalya resembled one ofhis classmates and other times she looked like the strange woman who had massaged his head. Even the distant hills covered in fog, looked like cursed women.

The next day as he walked to the bus-stop, he thought, “Isn’t that how people gradually go mad”. While he behaved normally in the village, he would let his imagination run riot as soon as he came to the bus – stop. He would dream of precious stones washed ashore by the waves and divine damsels bathing in the river, the sparkling chariot of the God on the clouds that wandered the valley before it came down. He also dreamt that the trees transformed their branches into hands and ruffled the hair of their neighbouring trees.

Ramesha would start to dream as soon as he reached the bus-stop and would always miss the bus. Some strange beggar woman massaging his head with fragrant oil, had turned out quite like Alladdin rubbing the Magiclamp.

People in the village grumbled at his behaviour and his mother thoughtt that he was sick. He tried to come out ofhis strange malady. But as soon he reached the bus – stop, the magic world ofhis mind drew him again to the dream world. The huge – boulder drew him towards it similar to a drunkard to a bar. He wished the bus would arrive as soon as he reached the bus-stop. But it never did. He rolled in his gem- studded dreams. Even the bus was a dream His dreams came impatiently one after the other.

Ramesha tried waiting in a different bus stop. But none of the buses stopped there. As time wait by, he desperately prayed, “God! Make my mind like it was before.” He felt as if the dreams had lodged themselves in his head and was oppressing him, as ifhe had become a bonded labourer, a slave to the boulder opposite, the huge trees around and the descending clouds.

If things had gone on like this, he perhaps would have gone mad! Once, when he stood in the bus stop, the boulder opposite clapped. Surprised, Ramesha went near it and listened intently, wondering which cursed woman would emerge out of it. And he heard the claps again from inside the boulder! As he watched, the boulder that looked like the back of an elephant cracked. On top of the boulder, right at the start of the crack, was a banyan plant. Who knows which bird’s dropping had planted the banyan seed there? By some magic, it had sunk its roots into the rock and had even sprouted a few leaves. The boulder, which couldn’t be shaken even by explosives, had suddenly cracked under the pressure of roots as thin as hair. Its leaves, which played in the wind, looked at Ramesha and rolled with laughter.

It would be crazy to connect this incident to Ramesha getting all right again. But, after this, Ramesha missed his bus less often.

The Golden Dream Glossary

distinguished         : commanding great respect
depict                    : represent; portray
providence            : protective forces of God or nature
Hatthur                  : Kannada word: ‘hattu’ -climb and ‘ooru‘- village,
transcended          : go above and beyond; set limits
flanked                  : be on each side
flag down             : asking for a lift by waving at the driver to stop
ambience             : feeling or mood associated with a place
unintelligible       : not clear enough to be understood
knotty                 : complicated; complex; difficult to solve
paltry                  : small; not very important
mongrel             : inferior dog

The Golden Dream Questions & Answers

Guided Reading

Question 1.
Why are the people of Hatthur described as ‘a detached lot’?
Answer:
The people of Hatthur are described as ‘a detached lot’ because they seemed to have transcended desire, anger, pride, jealousy, and all the rest of the vices.

Question 2.
Why did the people think Ramesha had turned strange?
Answer:
The people of Hatthur thought Ramesha had gone mad be¬cause he either stood rooted or sat glued for hours at the bus – stand.

Question 3.
With whom did Ramesha live?
Answer:
Ramesha was livid with his mother.

Question 4.
Where was Hatthur located?
Answer:
Hatthur was located beyond a hill range on the right side of the Mangalore Highway.

Question 5.
Why wouldn’t the Government sanction any money to the village in the budget?
Answer:
The government was reluctant to sanction any money to Hutthur village because the people never paid tax or levy.

Question 6.
Why was politics not possible in Hatthur?
Answer:
Politices was not possible in Hutthur because the village had just three or four villages. Moreover, no politician went their to seek votes.

Question 7.
How did Hatthur probably get its name?
Answer:
The village was named ‘Hathhur ’ because it was located beyond a hill – range. People had to climb up the hill and then down the other side to reach the village. In Kannada ‘Hatthu’ means ‘to climb’and‘urn’means village.

Question 8.
For how long did Ramesha usually have to wait for the bus?
Answer:
Ramesha had to wait for hours for the bus to arrive.

Question 9.
How many buses would stop at the bus stop?
Answer:
Only a couple of shuttle buses that went round all villages stopped at the bus – stop. Occasionally a bus would stop if any passenger gets off the bus on that round.

Question 10.
The reasnn for Ramesha’s strange behavior was
a. Oil rubbed by the woman
b. Spell cast by a girl of his class
c. Magical ambience of the bus-stand
Answer:
c. Magical ambience of the bus-stand.

Question 11.
What did Ramesha imagine the boulder on the other of the road to be?
Answer:
Ramesa imagined that the huge – rock resembled the back of an elephant and started breathing and heaving.

Question 12.
The boulder started to breathe when _________
a. he learnt the method of rejecting the cause and effect relationship of the physical world.
b. the woman rubbed oil on him.
c. the girl of his class cast a spell on him.
Answer:
a. he learnt the method of rejecting the cause and effect relationship of the physical world.

Question 13.
Why did Ramesha try waiting in a different bus stop?
Answer:
Ramesha tried to forget his newly mastered art but as soon as he reached the bus – stand the Magic world of his mind drew him again to dreamworld so he tried waiting in a different bus stop but none of the buses stopped there.

Question 14.
What sounds did Ramesha hear from the boulder?
ANswer:
Ramesha heard clapping sounds from inside the boulder.

Question 15.
What was the cause of the sounds from the boulder?
Answer:
The cause of the sounds from the boulder was its cracking. A bird might have dropped a seed of a banyan tree and by some magic, the seed had sunk its roots into the rock and had even sprouted a few leaves. The boulder, which couldn’t be shaken by expensive had suddenly cracked under the pressure of roots as thin as hair.

Question 16.
Describe Hatthur and its people.
Answer:
Hatthur was surrounded by thick jungles and flanked by two streams on its right and left. It didn’t have a government road. The village was not marked in the government maps. People did not pay tax or levy, so government had neglected it. No politician went there to seek votes as it had only three or four houses and hence no politics was possible.

The people of Hatthur were a detached Lot. They seem to have transcended desire, anger, pride, jealousy and all the rest of vices. It was a matter of great wonder that they yet manage to have children. But they were brave and were’nt scared of anything.

Question 17.
What did the people talk about Ramesha’s strange behavior?
Answer:
The people gossiped about Ramesha’s strange behaviour. Some people noticed that he spent most of his time at the bus stand. They thought that he was suffering from a strange disease. Some felt that some dirty bitch had cast of magic spell in him. Others protested that he was still a young boy to say that he is mad after girls. Some others felt sad for his mother. Ramesha’s father was dead and his mother had brought him up. They had a few acres of land in Hatthur and eked a living from the land.

Question 18.
How is Hatthur bus stop described in the story?
Answer:
The ‘MandalPanchayat bus-stand’ at which Ramesha waited everyday to go to school was located on a deserted stretch of the Mangalore Highway with thick forests on either side. One could only identify that the place was a bus – stop of observing a mud – road leading somewhere into the forest.

Buses rarely stopped there. Only a couple of shuttle buses went round all the villages. The passengers who got down at that bus stop would be terrified at the sight of Ramesha as if he were a wild animal.

The author tells us that the bus- stop was a strange place because it was always deserted. If one happened to be timid, he would never wait at the bus – stop for more than ten minutes since the place was located deep in the western ghats. It was always cloudy and foggy. The vehicles had a tough time negotiating along the highway even in day- time with their headlights switched on.

If a traveller waiting at the bus stop, was desperate to reach home, and tried to flag down a passing vehicle, the drivers speed away in fear, as though they had seen a Chambal valley dacoit.

Question 19.
What kind of criminal activities had taken place in the deserted forest road?
Answer:
The deserted place was a haven for criminals. Smugglers from Kerala and Mangalore used the road to smuggle sandal wood. Muderers would use the river flowing down the valley to dump dead bodies or drop them down the steep hillside. Several bones and skeletons were found when the army came in search a helicopter which had crashed in the valley after taking off from Bengaluru.

Question 20.
Describe Ramesha’s encounter with a strange, Hindi-speaking woman.
Answer:
One day as usual Ramesha was waiting for the bus to arrive. He heard someone talking behind him. When he looked back he was surprised to see some strange looking people with red mus¬taches and hair, wearing turbans, coming down the Hatthur road. They had some donkeys, which carried loads. He thought that they were nomadic tribal. They spoke in Hindi. They stopped on the other side of the road. They sat beside a huge rock and talked among themselves. After sometime the group dispersed and walked away, each a furlong apart from the other.

Ramesha had never seen them before in the village and wondered from where they had come from. They were surely strangers as anyone would have noticed them in the village. He was curious because the path through the forest lead only to Hatthur. He wondered if it also led to some other mysterious places in the thick forest.

Ramesh stood at the bus – stop in disbelief unconsciously staring at the huge rock. There was no one around except for a couple of dogs and a few people. He wasn’t scared as was natural for people from Hatthur. People who got scared easily didn’t survive there.

Just then, a woman who was standing near the rock came straight towards him and stared at him for a long time. She spoke to him in Hindi and asked him a lot of questions. Ramesha could not understand her and stood blinking at her. When she saw that Ramesha could not understand her, she asked him through gestures if he would like her to remove his ear wax. Ramesha refused impatiently, swaging his head sideways. She forcibly took his hand and began telling his fortune. Ramesha was clueless as he didn’t understand her. Later she took out a bottle of oil from her bag and started massaging his lead. The oil had a strange fragrance, she touched him all over on the pretext ofmassaging. He wondered if it were a dream or reality.

At that time, the bus arrived. Ramesha hurriedly got into the bus. He looked back to see the strange woman standing at the bus – stand with a bag slung over her shoulders, beside her two mongrels (dogs).

Question 21.
Discuss the strange activities that took place on the forest road.
Answer:
Another day, as Ramesha stood at the bus – stop, he started staring at the huge boulder. He imagined that it looked like the back of an elephant. It was as if a hidden faculty his mind had come alive. Once he learnt the method or rejecting the cause and effect rela¬tionship of the physical world, the boulder opposite slowly started breathing and he could see it heaving. In the fog – enveloped magical world, the trees started dancing to the tune of Ramesh’s imagi¬nation as if they were made of rubber. Like a ring master, he conducted their dancing.

Suddenly he thought he heard the bus approaching and stopped his dreaming and got ready to stop the bus. It was not the bus but an Ambassador car with tinted glass. He waved at it to stop but it sped away He had heard that smugglers always had tinted glass on their windows. He wondered if the car’s dicky was full of gold biscuits. Within minutes of Ramesha’s mastering ofhis new art of dreaming, another car came along chasing the first car. The people in the first car threw sacks of gold into the river some sacks fell on the bank.

Ramesha ran to the river bank and collected a bag of gold biscuits. Later he started wondering what to do with them and what they were worth in rupees. Hethought oftaking themhome and get some jewellery made for his mother. But he realized that it would be a problem to explain the goldsmith how he got the gold biscuits. He thought of bribing the goldsmith by giving him a share of the gold. He realized that if the poor get gold, it means trouble.

Question 22.
What problems did Ramesha get into, after mastering the art of dreaming?
Answer:
Ramesha would start to dream as soon as he reached the bus – stop and would always miss the bus. Some strange beggar woman massaging his head with fragrant oil, had turned out quite like Alladdin rubbing the Magiclamp.

People in the village grumbled at his behaviour and his mother thoughtt that he was sick. He tried to come out ofhis strange malady. But as soon he reached the bus – stop, the magic world of his mind drew him again to the dreamworld. The huge – boulder drew him towards it similar to a drunkard to a bar. He wished the bus would arrive as soon as he reached the bus-stop. But it never did. He rolled in his gem- studded dreams. Even the bus was a dream. His dreams came impatiently one after the other.

Ramesha tried waiting in a different bus stop. But none of the buses stopped there. As time went by, he desperately prayed, “God! Make my mind like it was before.” He felt as if the dreams had lodged themselves in his head and was oppressing him, as if he had become a bonded labourer, a slave to the boulder opposite, the huge trees around and the descending clouds.

If things had gone on like this, he perhaps would have gone mad! Once, when he stood in the bus stop, the boulder opposite clapped. Surprised, Ramesha went near it and listened intently, wondering which cursed woman would emerge out of it. And he heard the claps again from inside the boulder! As he watched, the boulder that looked like the back of an elephant cracked. On top of the boulder, right at the start of the crack, was a banyan plant. Who knows which bird’s dropping had planted the banyan seed there? By some magic, it had sunk its roots into the rock and had even sprouted a few leaves. The boulder, which couldn’t be shaken even by explosives, had suddenly cracked under the pressure of roots as thin as hair. Its leaves, which played in the wind, looked at Ramesha and rolled with laughter.

It would be crazy to connect this incident to Ramesha getting all right again. But, after this, Ramesha missed his bus less often.

Question 23.
What different forms did the boulder assume, in Ramesha’s imagination?
Answer:
Another day, as Ramesha stood at the bus – stop, he started staring at the huge boulder. He imagined that it looked like the back of an elephant. It was as if a hidden faculty his mind had come alive. Once he leamt the method or rejecting the cause and effect relationship of the physical world, the boulder opposite slowly started breathing and he could see it heaving.

He imagined that the rock resembled the cursed Ahalya (of Ramayana) chanting the name of Lord Rama. When Lord Rama had stepped on the rock Ahalya was freed from the curse and emerged from the rock breaking it. Sometimes Ahalya resembled one of his classmates and other times she looked like the strange woman who had massaged his head. Even the distant hills covered in fog, looked like cursed women.

Question 24.
How did Ramesha get cured?
Answer:
Ramesha tried waiting in a different bus stop. But none of the buses stopped there. As time went by, he desperately prayed, “God! Make my mind like it was before.” He felt as if the dreams had lodged themselves in his head and was oppressing him, as if he had become a bonded labourer, a slave to the boulder opposite, the huge trees around and the descending clouds.

If things had gone on like this, he perhaps would have gone mad! Once, when he stood in the bus stop, the boulder opposite clapped. Surprised, Rame-sha went near it and listened intently, wondering which cursed woman would emerge out of it. And he heard the claps again from inside the boulder! As he watched, the boulder that looked like the back of an elephant cracked. On top of the boulder, right at the start of the crack, was a banyan plant. Who knows which bird’s dropping had planted the banyan seed there? By some magic, it had sunk its roots into the rock and had even sprouted a few leaves. The boulder, which couldn’t be shaken even by explosives, had suddenly cracked under the pressure of roots as thin as hair. Its leaves, which played in the wind, looked at Ramesha and rolled with laughter.

It would be crazy to connect this incident to Ramesha getting all right again. But, after this, Ramesha missed his bus less often.

Question 25.
Hatthur is a typical Indian village, ignored and forgotten by the governments. Discuss.
Answer:
The location and population of Hatthur was the main cause for all problems that the people of Hatthur suffered. Hatthur was located on a small hill lock surrounded by thick forest and flanked by two streams on either side. The village had not even been marked on government maps. There ware no roads leading to the village. People of the village did not pay taxes nor the government would sanction even a paltry coin for the village in its budget, since the village had only three or four houses, politics was ruled out.

If one had to go to Hatthur he had to get down on the Manglore Highway and walk up the hill-range and then down beyond the hills or reach it. The author thinks the village got its name ‘Hatthur ’ because one had to go up the hill -lock and down the other side to reach it. ‘Hatthu’ In Kannada means ‘climb’, ‘urn’ means ‘village’.

The ‘MandalPanchayat bus-stand’ at which Ramesha waited everyday to go to school was located on a deserted stretch of the Mangalore Highway with thick forests on either side one could only identify that the place was a bus – stop of observing a mud – road leading somewhere into the forest Buses rarely stopped there. Only a couple of shuttle buses went round all the villages. The passengers who got down at that bus stop would be terrified at the sight of Ramesha as if he were a wild animal.

The author tells us that the bus- stop was a strange place because it was always deserted. If one happened to be timid, he would never wait at the bus – stop for more than ten minutes since the place was located deep in the western ghats. It was always cloudy and foggy. The vehicles had a tough time negotiating along the highway even in day- time with their headlights switched on.

If a traveller waiting at the bus stop, was desperate to reach home, and tried to flag down a passing vehicle, the drivers who speed away in fear, as though they had seen a Chambal valley dacoit.

Question 26.
Ramesha’s waiting for the bus, is also a comment on the difficulties children of rural India face to get a decent education. Do you agree? Give reasons.
Answer:
Yes, I agree that Ramesha’s waiting for the bus. It also comment on the difficulties children of rural India face to get a decent education.

Ramesha’s village ‘Hatthur’was located beyond a hill – range. It was a tiny village with three or four houses, they were poor people and eked a living on they couldnot pay any kind of taxes or levis, and hence there wasn’t even a government road to their village. Moreover, their village was located in the midst of thick forest in the wistem ghats. They had to take a shuttle bus to the National high way, to go to other places. When the government wasn’t able to provide a decent road to the village, it can be assumed that they would never provide a school for the children of the village, with only three or four households.

Not many buses stopped at the ‘Mandal Panchayat bus – stop’ an the Mangalore Highway from where people had to walk to Hatthur. We can only imagine the children walking through the thick forest, infested by wild animals and maybe criminals to reach the Bus-stand and take the shuttle bus to school. They would be Mentally and Physically exhausted In such a condition how would they direct their attention to studiest school.

In the short story. ‘The Goldren dream’ author the location and population of Hatthur was the main cause for all problems that the people of Hatthur suffered.
Hatthur was located on a small hill lock surrounded by thick forest and flanked by two streams on either side. The village had not even been marked on government maps. There ware no roads leading to the village. People of the village did not pay taxes nor the government would sanction even a paltry coin for the village in its budget, since the village had only three or four houses, politics was ruledout.

If one had to go to Hatthur he had to get down on the Manglore Highway and walk up the hill-range and then down beyond the hills or reach it. The author thinks the village got its name ‘Hatthur’ because one had to go up the hill -lock and down the other side to reach it. ‘Hatthu’ In Kamiada means ‘climb’, ‘uru’ means ‘village’.

The ‘Mandal Panchayat bus-stand’ at which Ramesha waited everyday to go to school was located on a deserted stretch of the Mangalore Highway with thick forests on either side one could only identify that the place was a bus – stop of observing a mud – road leading somewhere into the forest.
Buses rarely stopped there. Only a couple of shuttle buses went round all the villages. The passengers who got down at that bus stop would be terrified at the sight of Ramesha as if he were a wild animal.

The author tells us that the bus- stop was a strange place because it was always deserted. If one happened to be timid, he would never wait at the bus – stop for more than ten minutes since the place was located deep in the western ghats. It was always cloudy and foggy. The vehicles had a tough time negotiating along the highway even in day- time with their headlights switched on.

If a traveller waiting at the bus stop, was desperate to reach home, and tried to flag down a passing vehicle, the drivers who speed away in fear, as though they had seen a Chambal valley dacoit.

Question 27.
The activities happening on the forest road and the imagination in Ramesha’s mind were two different distant worlds. Discuss.
Answer:
The activities happening on the forest road and the imagination in Ramesha’s mind were two different distent worlds. The happening on the road were a reality. But the imagination in Ramesha’s mind were a childs facscination for exotic things, his aspirations and dreams.

In the short stoiy ‘The Golden Dream’. The people gossiped about Ramesha’s strange behaviour. Some people noticed that he spent most of his time at the bus stand. They thought that he was suffering from a strange disease. Some felt that some dirty bitch had cast of magic spell in him. Others protested that he was still a young boy to say that he is mad after girls. Some others felt sad for his mother. Ramesha’s father was dead and his mother had brought him up. They had a few acres of land in Hatthur and eked a living from the land.

The ‘Mandal Panchayat bus-stand’ at which Ramesha waited everyday to go to school was located on a deserted stretch of the Mangalore Highway with thick forests on either side one could only identify that the place was a bus – stop of observing a mud – road leading somewhere into the forest. Buses rarely stopped there. Only a couple of shuttle buses went round all the villages. The passengers who got down at that bus stop would be terrified at the sight of Ramesha as if he were a wild animal.

The author tells us that the bus- stop was a strange place because it was always deserted. If one happened to be timid, he would never wait at the bus – stop for more than ten minutes since the place was located deep in the western ghats. It was always cloudy and foggy. The vehicles had a tough time negotiating along the highway even in day- time with their headlights switched on.

If a traveller waiting at the bus stop, was desperate to reach home, and tried to flag down a passing vehicle, the drivers who speed away in fear, as though they had seen a ChambaJ valley dacoit.

The deserted place was a haven for criminals. Smugglers from Kerala and Mangalore used the road to smuggle sandal wood. Muderers would use the river flowing down the valley to dump dead bodies or drop them down the steep hillside. Several bones and skeletons were found when the army came in to search a heli¬copter which had crashed in the valley after taking off from Bengaluru.

One day as usual Ramesha was waiting for the bus to arrive. He heard someone talking behind him. When he looked back he was surprised to see some strange looking people with red mus¬taches and hair, wearing turbans, coming down the Hatthur road. They had some donkeys, which carried loads. He thought that they were nomadic tribal. They spoke in Hindi. They stopped on the other side of the road. They sat beside a huge rock and talked among themselves. After sometime the group dispersed and walked away, each a furlong apart from the other.

Ramesha had never seen them before in the village and wondered future they had come from they were surely strangers as anyone would have noticed them in the village. He was curious because the path through the forest lead only to Hatthur. He wondered if it also led to some other mysterious places in the thick forest.

Ramesh stood at the bus – stop in disbelief unconsciously staring at the huge rock. There was no one around except for a couple of dogs and a few people. He wasn’t scared as was natural for people fromHatthur. People who got scared easily didn’t survive there.

Just then, a woman who was standing near the rock came straight towards him and stared at him for a long time. She spoke to him in Hindi and asked him a lot of questions. Ramesha could not understand her and stood blinking at her. When she saw that Ramesha could not understand her, she asked him through gestures if the would like her to remove his ear wax. Ramesha refused impatiently, swaging his head sideways. She forcibly took his hand and began telling his fortune. Ramesha was clueless as he didn’t understand her. Later she took out a bottle of oil from her bag and started massaging his lead. The oil had a strange fragrance, she touched him all over on the pretext of messaging. He wondered if it were a dream or reality.

At that time, the bus arrived. Ramesha hurriedly got into the bus. He looked back to see the strange woman standing at the bus – stand with a bag slung over her shoulders, beside her two mongrels (dogs).

Another day, as Ramesha stood at the bus – stop, he started staring at the huge boulder. He imagined that it looked like the back of an elephant. It was as if a hidden faculty his mind had come alive. Once he learnt the method or rejecting the cause and effect rela¬tionship of the physical world, the boulder opposite slowly started breathing and he could see it heaving. In the fog-enveloped magical world, the trees started dancing to the tune of Ramesh’s imagination as if they were made of rubber. Like a ringmaster, he conducted their dancing.

Suddenly he thought he heard the bus approaching and stopped his dreaming and got ready to stop the bus. It was not the bus but an Ambassador car with tinted glass. He waved at it to stop but it sped away. He had heard that smugglers always had tinted glass on their windows. He wondered if the car’s dicky was fall of gold biscuits. Within minutes of Ramesha’s mastering of his new art of dreaming, another car come along chasing the first car. The people in the first car threw sacks of gold into the river some sacks fell on the bank.

Ramesha ran to the river bank and collected a bag of gold biscuits. Later he started wondering what to do with them and what they were worth in rupees. He thought of taking them home and get some jewelers made for his mother. But he realized that it would be a problem to explain the goldsmith how he got the gold biscuits. He thought of bribing the goldsmith by giving him a share of the gold. He realized that if the poof get gold, it means trouble.

He imagined that the rock resembled the cursed Ahalya (of Ramayana) chanting the name of Lord Rama. When Lord Rama had stepped on the rock Ahalya was freed from the curse and emerged from the rock breaking it. Sometimes Ahalya resembled one of his classmates and other times she looked like the strange woman who had massaged his head. Even the distant hills covered in fog, looked like cursed women.

Ramesha tried waiting in a different bus stop. But none of the buses stopped there. As time went by, he desperately prayed, “God! Make my mind like it was before.” He felt as if the dreams had lodged themselves in his head and was oppressing him, as if he had become a bonded labourer, a slave to the boulder opposite, the huge trees around and the descending clouds.

If things had gone on like this, he perhaps would have gone mad! Once, when he stood in the bus stop, the boulder opposite clapped. Surprised, Rame-sha went near it and listened intently, wondering which cursed woman would emerge out ofit. And he heard the claps again from inside the boulder! As he watched, the boulder that looked like the back of an elephant cracked. On top of the boulder, right at the start of the crack, was a banyan plant. Who knows which bird’s dropping had planted the banyan seed there? By some magic, it had sunk its roots into the rock and had even sprouted a few leaves. The boulder, which couldn’t be shaken even by explosives, had suddenly cracked under the pressure of roots as thin as hair. Its leaves, which played in the wind, looked at Ramesha and rolled with laughter.

Ramesha tried waiting in a different bus stop. But none of the buses stopped there. As time went by, he desperately prayed, “God! Make my mind like it was before.” He felt as if the dreams had lodged themselves in his head and was oppressing him, as if he had become a bonded labourer, a slave to the boulder opposite, the huge trees around and the descending clouds.

If things had gone on like this, he perhaps would have gone mad! Once, when he stood in the bus stop, the boulder opposite clapped. Surprised, Ramesh went near it and listened intently, wondering which cursed woman would emerge out of it. And he heard the claps again from inside the boulder! As he watched, the boulder that looked like the back of an elephant cracked. On top of the boulder, right at the start of the crack, was a banyan plant. Who knows which bird’s dropping had planted the banyan seed there? By some magic, it had sunk its roots into the rock and had even sprouted a few leaves. The boulder, which couldn’t be shaken even by explosives, had suddenly cracked under the pressure of roots as thin as hair. Its leaves, which played in the wind, looked at Ramesha and rolled with laughter.

It would be crazy to connect this incident to Ramesha getting all right again. But, after this, Ramesha missed his bus less often.

Question 28.
Comment on Ramesha’s imaginary world.
Answer:
Refer III main Question No. 3.

Question 29.
Discuss how nature is mysterious and beyond human comprehension, with respect to the story.
Answer:
Refer III main Question No. 3.

Question 30.
Are dreams and reality one single activity of the mind or are they different? Discuss.
Answer:
The given short story ‘The Golden Dream’ is translation of the Kannada short story ‘Suvama Swapna’ by the eminent Kannada writer, novelist, photographer, publisher, painter, naturalist and environmentalist, Kuppalli Puttappa Pooma Chandra Tejaswi (1938-2007) It is translated from Kannada into English by Bageshree.

The Short story ‘The Golden Dream’ depicts the innocence, wonder, imagination and curiosity of childhood and the strange, wonderful ways of nature. It is extracted fromhis collection of short stories ‘PaakaKrantii’.

Tejaswi begins the story on a philosophical note “It is perhaps a law of providence that certain ailments should visit everyone at certain points of their lives”. He sets a premise for the proto ganist of the story, Rameshas stronge behaviour. The people of Hatthur (a tiny village in the Western Ghats of Karnataka) found Ramesha’s strange behaviour, of late, because he was normal until recently. The people ofHatthur were a somewhat a detached lot. They seemed to have overcome desire, anger, pride jealousyand all the rest of the vices. The Writer wonders how they had managed to have children.

The people gossiped about Ramesha’s strange behaviour. Some people noticed that he spent most of his time at the bus stand. They thought that he was suffering from a strange disease. Some felt that some dirty bitch had cast of magic spell in him. Others protested that he was still a young boy to say that he is mad after girls. Some others felt sad for his mother. Ramesha’s father was dead and his mother had brought him up. They had a few acres ofland in Hatthur and eked a living from the land.

The location and population of Hatthur was the main cause for all problems that the people of Hatthur suffered. Hatthur was located on a small hill lock surrounded by thick forest and flanked by two streams on either side. The village had not even been marked on government maps. There ware no roads leading to the village. People of the village did not pay taxes nor the government would sanction even a paltiy coin for the village in its budget, since the village had only three or four houses, politics was ruled out.

If one had to go to Hatthur he had to get down on the Manglore Highway and walk up the hill-range and then down beyond the hills or reach it. The author thinks the village got its name ‘Hatthur’. because one had to go up the hill -lock and down the other side to reach it. ‘Hatthu’ In Kannada means ‘climb’, ‘uru’ means ‘village’.

The ‘MandalPanchayat bus-stand’ at which Ramesha waited everyday to go to school was located on a deserted stretch of the Mangalore Highway with thick forests on either side one could only identify that the place was a bus – stop of observing a mud – road leading somewhere into the forest. Buses rarely stopped there. Only a couple of shuttle buses went round all the villages. The passengers who got down at that bus stop would be terrified at the sight of Ramesha as if he were a wildanimal. The author tells us that the bus- stop was a strange place because it was always deserted. If one happened to be timid, he would

never wait at the bus – stop for more than ten minutes since the place was located deep in the western ghats. It was always cloudy and foggy. The vehicles had a tough time negotiating along the highway even in day- time with their headlights switched on.

If a traveller waiting at the bus stop, was desperate to reach home, and tried to flag down a passing vehicle, the drivers who speed away in fear, as though they had seen a Chambal valley dacoit.

The deserted place was a haven for criminals. Smugglers from Kerala and Mangalore used the road to smuggle sandal wood. Muderers would use the river flowing down the valley to dump dead bodies or drop them down the steep hillside. Several bones and skeletons were found when the army came in to search a helicopter which had crashed in the valley after taking off from Bengaluru.

One day as usual Ramesha was waiting for the bus to arrive. He heard someone talking behind him. When he looked back he was surprised to see some strange looking people with red mustaches and hair, wearing turbans, coming down the Hatthur road. They had some donkeys, which carried loads. He thought that they were nomadic tribal. They spoke in Hindi. They stopped on the other side of the road. They sat beside a huge rock and talked among themselves. After sometime the group dispersed and walked away, each a furlong apart from the other.

Ramesha had never seen them before in the village and wondered future they had come from they were surely strangers as anyone would have noticed them in the village. .He was curious because the path through the forest lead only to Hatthur. He wondered if it also led to some other mysterious places in the thick forest.

Ramesh stood at the bus – stop in disbelief unconsciously staring at the huge rock. There was no one around except for a couple of dogs and a few people. He wasn’t scared as was natural for people from Hatthur. People who got scared easily didn’t survive there.

Just then, a woman who was standing near the rock came straight towards him and stared at him for a long time. She spoke to him in Hindi and asked him a lot of questions. Ramesha could not understand her and stood blinking at her. When she saw that Ramesha could not understand her, she asked him through gestures if the would like her to remove his ear wax. Ramesha refused impatiently, swaging his head sideways. She forcibly took his hand and began telling his fortune. Ramesha was clueless as he didn’t understand her. Later she took out a bottle of oil from her bag and started massaging his lead. The oil had a strange fragrance, she touched him all over on the pretext of messaging. He wondered if it were a dream or reality. At that time, the bus arrived. Ramesha hurriedly got into the bus. He looked back to see the strange woman standing at the bus – stand with a bag slung over her shoulders, beside her two mongrels (dogs).

This incident did not have any special significance in Ramesha’s life nor was it the reason for his strange behaviour. After a few weeks he had forgotten the incident. But the writer wonders if it was the ambience (atmosphere) of the bus—stand, the reason for his strange behaviour.

Another day, as Ramesha stood at the bus – stop, he started staring at the huge boulder. He imagined that it looked like the back of an elephant. It was as if a hidden faculty his mind had come alive. Once he learnt the method or rejecting the cause and effect relationship ofthe physical world, the boulder opposite slowly started breathing and he could see it heaving. In the fog-enveloped magical world, the trees started dancing to the tune of Ramesh’s imagination as if they were made of rubber. Like a ring master, he conducted their dancing.

Suddenly he thought he heard the bus approaching and stopped his dreaming and got ready to stop the bus. It was not the bus but an Ambassador car with tinted glass. He waved at it to stop but it sped away. He had heard that smugglers always had tinted glass on their windows. He wondered if the car’s dicky was lull of gold biscuits. Within minutes of Ramesha’s mastering of his new art of dreaming, another car come along chasing the first car. The people in the first carthrew sacks of gold into the river some sacks fell on the bank.

Ramesha ran to the river bank and collected a bag of gold biscuits. Later he started wondering what to do with them and what they were worth in rupees. He thought of taking them home and get some jewelers made for his mother. But he realized that it would be a problem to explain the goldsmith how he got the gold biscuits. He thought of bribing the goldsmith by giving him a share of the gold. He realized that if the poor get gold, it means trouble.

As he stood there lost in his predicament, he wasn’t even aware that he had missed the bus. He stood there wondering why the bus was late that day. Again he started staring at the huge rock. He imagined that the rock resembied the cursed Ahalya (of Ramayana) chanting the name of Lord Rama. When Lord Rama had stepped on the rock Ahalya was freed from the curse and emerged from the rock breaking it. Sometimes Ahalya resembled one offers classmates and other times she looked like the strange woman who had massaged his head. Even the distant hills covered in fog, looked like cursed women.

The next day as he walked to the bus-stop, he thought, “Isn’t that how people gradually go mad”. While he behaved normally in the village, he would let his imagination run riot as soon as he came to the bus – stop. He would dream of precious stones washed ashore by the waves and divine damsels bathing in the river, the sparkling chariot of the God on the clouds that wandered the valley before it came down. He also dreamt that the trees transformed their branches into hands and ruffled the hair of their neighbouring trees.

People in the village grumbled at his behaviour and his mother thoughtt that he was sick. He tried to come out of his strange malady. But as soon he reached the bus – stop, the magic world of his mind drew him again to the dream world. The huge – boulder drew him towards it similar to a drunkard to a bar. He wished the bus would arrive as soon as he reached the bus stop. But it never did. He rolled in his gem-studded dreams. Even the bus was a dream. His dreams came impatiently one after the other.

Ramesha tried waiting in a different bus stop. But none of the buses stopped there. As time went by, he desperately prayed, “God! Make my mind like it was before.” He felt as if the dreams had lodged themselves in his head and was oppressing him, as if he had become a bonded labourer, a slave to the boulder opposite, the huge trees around and the descending clouds.

If things had gone on like this, he perhaps would have gone mad! Once, when he stood at the bus stop, the boulder opposite clapped. Surprised, Ramesh went near it and listened intently, wondering which cursed woman would emerge out of it. And he heard the claps again from inside the boulder! As he watched, the boulder that looked like the back of an elephant cracked. On top of the boulder, right at the start of the crack, was a banyan plant. Who knows which bird’s dropping had planted the banyan seed there? By some magic, it had sunk its roots into the rock and had even sprouted a few leaves. The boulder, which couldn’t be shaken even by explosives, had suddenly cracked under the pressure of roots as thin as hair. Its leaves, which played in the wind, looked at Ramesha and rolled with laughter.

It would be crazy to connect this incident to Ramesha getting all right again. But, after this, Ramesha missed his bus less often.

English Summary

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