The Liar Summary Notes

The Liar Author

Mulk Raj Anand (12th December 1905, Peshawar, India – 28th September 2004)

He was a prominent Indian author, who has written novels, short stories, and critical essays in English. One of the pioneers of Indo-Anglian fiction, he with R.K. Narayan and Raja Rao was one of first India – based writers in English to gain international readership.

He first gained wide recognition for his novels. Untouchable (1935) and Coolie (1936). His other major works are The village (1939) and The Sword and the Sickle (1942). He also edited magazines and journals. He was a recipient of the civilian honor of Padma Bhusan in 1968.

The Liar Summary

Mulk Raj Anand was a prominent Indian author in English. In the given short story ‘The Liar’ the writer demonstrates the art of storytelling through the fantastical stories woven by Labhu, an old shikari, and told to the then young impressionable boy of the village, who is also the narrator of the short story.

The narrator writes that Labhu was a box Liar and was infamous as the best storyteller in their neighborhood. Labhu belonged to the untouchable sweeper caste but was praised for his uncanny ability for rendering amazing stories. The narrator’s family did not object to his proximity to Labhu.

Labhu was a thin, little man, bright and agile – ‘with the glint of a lance and glide of an arrow”. He was very energetic and could chase stags up the steep boulders of the hills behind their village and could mn as fast as Subedur Deep Singh’s horse, He was in Subedar Deep Singh’s service. Sometimes he acted as a Shikari to the Subedar’s guests. He had a sensitive, dark, and expressive face. The narrator was a big fan of Labhu. Labhu taught the narrator how to browbeat his father when he played all afternoon. The author was an ardent disciple of Labhu.

Once the author, challenged Labhu that it was impossible to track a prey when he was half up the side of a hill lock. Labhu disproved him by tracking a ram up the hillcock until he found it hiding in a cave. Sometimes the narrator would provoke Labhu saying that he didn’t believe the tale of a ‘devil ram’, that Labhu was supposed to have seen while hunting in the forest with Subedar Deep Singh.

Labhu would swear that it was true and the Subedar was also a witness, when both of them saw, a terrible apparition of a beast. Labhu describes the beast exaggeratedly as “It was a beast about the size of an elephant, with eyes as big as hen’s eggs and a beard as long as that of Maulvi Shah Din, the priest of the Mosque, only not henna – dyed and red, but blue-black, it had huge ears as big as an elephant’s which did not flap, but pricked up like the ears of the Subedar’s (Deep Singh); it had a nose like that of the wife of the Missionary Sahib, and it had square jaws which showed teeth almost as big as the chunks of marble which lie outside the temple”

Labhu goes on to narrate that he and the Subedar had a sudden encounter with such a beast on the Devi Parbat at twelve thousand feet on the mountain while they were hunting. They had thought that it was an ‘OoriaP – a Himalayan wild, homed sheep – and started to chase it. But the beast was frightened of them and disappeared into the mountain with a kick of its forefeet. He had stood there bravely while the Subedar trembled with fear. He says that he was fortunate to have seen such a beast – ‘devil – God of the tribe of rams’. He promised narrator the one day he would show him such a beast.

Though the narrator was fascinated by the chimera (illusion) the author did not believe that such a thing existed. Labhu tried to convince the author that such things existed by narrating another superfluous tale of a huge snake, that even he didn’t believe it.

The narrator accuses Labhu for being a Liar. Labhu gets angry and vows not to teach him anything more and to take him hunting trips. The narrator stubbornly tells Labhu that he would never speak to him again and they part ways.

Later, Labhu went for a hunting tour and did not come back for a long time. The narrator regretted Labu’s absence. He eagerly overheard the villagers assassinate Labhu’s character, though they were not as good marksmen as Labhu. They accused him of stalking his prey by the forest pool and shooting it from a safe comer, but they agreed that he was an efficient tracker (of animals). The narrator’s father accused him of being a ‘vain boaster and liar ’, and that the only beast that he shot was a hare and that too in the leg.

The narrator waited eagerly for Labhu’s return so that he could directly ask him if the insinuations of the villagers were true. Labhu returned to the village. He limped about and seemed ill. The narrator was sad at his plight. He seemed broken and dispirited. The narrator pitied him and forgot all the scandals about him. Labhu was not the same talkative man who weaved fantastic stories. He became an introvert and lay unconscious all day, sometimes he limped about with a stick in his hand in the evenings.

He appeared angry and unfriendly, so the narrator avoided going to him The villagers ignored him But the narrator could not restrain himself and went to his hut. Labhu was sleeping on a broken string bed under the shade of a peepal tree. They reconciled and Labhu told him that he was away on a hunting tour with the Subedar’s eldest son, Kuldeep Singh to Nepal.

He went on to narrate the same rig amoral of his fictitious adventures where he had shot twelve tigers and fifteen panthers and several stags in seven days. He related this fabulous encounter with a monster with the body of a wild bear, the head of a reindeer, the feet of a goat, the tail of a wild bull and a glistening, fibrous tissue all around it like the white silken veil which he seen on the Rani of Boondi when she visited Subedar Deep Singh’s wife. All the others were frightened of this apparition thinking it was the devil himself and thought of killing it.

But Labhu felt that the monster was a royal princess of Nepal who was under the spell of an evil magician and wanted to catch it alive and marry her. Labu had resolved to transform her back to a princess by reading magical incantations, but the Subedar’s son had fired at it and frightened the creature and she had vanished into the thin air of the Kailash Parbat.

He had leaped from mountain to mountain to rescue her, but the shots fired by the others had roused the magician who had cast a spell on her. The angry magician had thrown a huge ball of snow at him, to kill him. But he was not frightened and blew a hot breath at the snow bafi when it disintegrated into a million pieces and spread about in the sky like glittering stars.

The magician had then stamped the earth with his feet to open up a grave to bury him. But Labhu had leaped across it and found himself on a peak in the land of the immortal lamb.

At last, he found that the magician had hidden the beautiful princess in a cave. But he had given up his mission to save her, fearing death at the hands of the magician. He had returned home by leaping across the Himalayas. The narrator completed Labhus’ labulous tale by saying, “And as you landed this side of the mountains you sprained your foot”.

Labhu knew he had been found out but being a master storyteller he didn’t accept defeat. He laughed at the narrator’s ingenuity saying, “Have I told you this story before then?”

Labhu had a vivid imagination and a willingness to share his imagination with others. His efforts are praise – worthy as his only intention was to entertain and enchant those who listened to him was actually not a liar but a gifted storyteller who captivated his listeners with his fantastic stories.

The Liar Glossary

Shikari                  : a hunter
Poignant              : evoking a keen sense of sadness orregret
Gruesome            : causing repulsion or horror
Precarious            : not securely held or inposition
Ram                     : a male sheep
Oorial                  : a wild homed Himalayan sheep
Manifestation     : an event, action or object that clearly shows or embodies something abstract or theoretical
Incredulous        : unwilling or unable to ………..something.
Chimaera           : a thing which is hoped for but is illusory or impossible to achieve; a…. breathing female monster with a hon’s head, a goat’s body and a serpent’s tail.
Vouchsafed       : give or grant (something) to (someone) in a gracious or condescending manner.
Chargined         : feel distressed or humiliated
Purblind            : partially blind
Kailash Parbat   : mountain range
Bafflement         : to confuse, bewilder or perplex.

The Liar Questions & Answers

Comprehension

Question 1.
What was Labhu’s defining character?
Answer:
Labhu was a prolific Liar and could weave fantastic stories of his fictitious adventures.

Question 2.
Labhu had a glint of a _________ and the glide of an ________
Answer:
Lance, arrow

Question 3.
Why was the narrator Labhu’s devoted follower?
Answer:
The spell of Labhu’s tragic verses and weird stories cast on the narrator made him his devoted follower through childhood.

Question 4.
The narrator was a critical pupil. True / False?
Answer:
True.

Question 5.
What did the Subedar and his employers think of Labhu?
Answer:
The Subedar and his employers thought that Labhu was an inefficient maksman and often shoots in the dark and that he is no good except for tracking. The narrator’s father thought that Labhu was a vain boaster and a Lair.

Question 6.
Why was Labhu limping?
Answer:
Labhu boasted that when he was on a hunting trip to Nepal, with the Subedar’s son Kuldeep Singh, he pursued a monster who was actually a princess of Nepal transformed into a monster by a magicians spell He had desired to capture the monster and transform it back into a princess and marry her. But the Magician came to know his plan and tried to kill him. Labhu feared for his life and jumped across the Himalayas and landed in the village and sprained his foot.

Question 7.
The narrator respected Labhu as a:
a. Story – teller
b. Liar
c. Shikari
d. Soldier.
Answer:
a. Story – teller

Question 8.
Describe Labhu
Answer:
Labhu was a thin, little man, with the glint of lance and the glide of an arrow. His wiry, weather-beaten frame had an immense reserve of energy that he could chase stags up the steep crags of the hills behind the village. He could run abreast of the bay mare of his employer Subedar Deep singh. Labhu was a proficient Shikari. He possessed the wonderful physical agility required for a professional shikari. Labhu had a sensitive, dark face. His lower lips trembled as it pronounced the first accents of a poignant (sad) verse or last words of a gruesome hunting story. Labhu was an invertebrate Lair and could spin extraordinary stories of his hunting adventures which could captivate the attention of the people in his village.

Question 9.
Provide a character analysis of the narrator
Answer:
The narrator belonged to the upper caste of the village but he had no inhibition for mingling with, Labhu, a prolific liar and shikari of his village. His mother indulged his proximity with Labhu. The narrator had grown up listening to Labhu. The narrator was a critical pupil of Labhu, yet he was full of admiration for Labhu, because he weaved fantastic stories. The narrator was a devoted follower of Labhu. Labhu had taught him how to concoct a cock – and – bull story to tell his father if he had to make an excuse for not being at home in the afternoon. The narrator is intrigued with Labhu’s fantastic stories. But he notices that Labhu’s tales are so fanciful that he terminates his friendship with Labhu. The narrator did not wish to be considered as fool. The narrator displays his strong bonds of friendship with Labhu and reconciles with him when Labhu returned from his hunting trip after a long time. The narrator regretted missing to hear Labhu’s fantastical stories when he was away on his hunting trip.

When Labhu was away on the hunting trip, and the narrator heard scandalous stories of Labhu’s incompetence, although he did not believe them. He decides to ask Labhu for justification of the stories, but when he comes back after a long time, he limped about and seemed ill The narrator was sad to see him broken and disprited and forgot all the scandal he had heard about Labhu. The narrator was puzzled by labhus’ sudden change that had come into his character. He appeared angry and wore a fore-bidding book. The narrator was afraid to go near him Even when the villager’s deserted Labhu, the narrator stayed loyal to him and reconciled with him.

Question 10.
What did Labhu think of Kuldeep Singh and his friends?
Answer:
Kuldeep Singh was the eldest son of Subedar Deep Singh. He was in the Indian army. Labhu had accompained Kuldeep Singh and his friends as a shikari when they went to Nepal on a hunting tour. Labhu felt that they had no experience of hunting anywhere in the world. Labhu doubted Kuldeep singh’s skill at shooting, though he was in Lieutanant in the army. He felt that Kuldeep Singh couldn’t shoot at any range and his friends were also clumsy and purblind (half-blind) white men, because they were awkward and could not shoot any animal that he pointed with his stick.

They couldn’t handle their guns properly or were too noisy on their feet, which alerted the bull they had been stalking and it would run away to safety. Labhu had remained impassive because they were like children. Labhu felt that they had wasted hundreds of cartridges and had not shot anything. They used to besige him to help them to secure some game everyday. But they wasted every opportunity to shoot a game. Labhu was exasperated and told them that game doesn’t taste sweet unless it is shot by oneself. But he had pitied their failure to shoot any game and had shot twelve tigers and fifteen panthers and many stags in seven days for them.

Question 11.
What explanation was given by Labhu, when the narrator asked him about his limp?
Answer:
Labhu weaved a fantastic fictional story to the narrator when he had asked him about his limp. Labhu was a shikari to Kuldeep Singh and his friends, when they went to Nepal on a hunting trip. On the eight day, they saw a monster which had the body of a wild bear, the head of a reindeer, the feet of a goat, the tail of a wild bull and a glistening, fibrous tissue all round it like the white silken veil which the Rani of Boondi when she came to visit Subedar Deep Singh’s wife. Kuldeep Singh and his friends were very frightened of the apparition and said it was the devil himself in the shape of an earthy being and who would soon breathe a breath that would poision the still air on the Himalayas.

They had thought of killing the ghastly beast. But Labhu had stopped them. He was sure it was a princess of a royal house of Nepal who had been transformed by some magician into that fantastic beast. He had desired to catch it alive and transform it back into a princess and marry her. He boasted about her beauty and how she had smiled shyly when he had told her that he loved her and desired to marry her. But she ran away frightened, when Kuldeep Singh had fired at her and vanished into thin air of Kailash Parbat.

Labhu told the narrator that he was determined to reseue her and had pursued her from one mountain to another, pleading her to stop. The evil Magician had heard the gun shots and hidden her in a cave when Labhu tried to rescue her, the evil Magician had thrown a huge mountain of snow at him. Labhu had blown a hot breath at it and it disintegrated into smithereens and glittered like stars above the mountains.

The enraged Magician had struck the earth with his feet to open up a grave to bury Labhu alive. But he had Leapt across it and found himself in the land of the Lamb who never dies. Labhu and given up the chase fearing his life and jumped across the Himalays to his village.

Question 12.
Recount any one story told by Labhu which impressed the narrator.
Answer:
The narrator had criticized Labhu for telling him a fictitious unbelievable story ofhis encounter with a fantastical devil ram Labhu had sworn that it was true and he could ask the Subedar to vouch for it, as he had also witnessed that terrible apparition Labhu went on to narrate a story ofhis encounter with a beast about the size of an elephant.

Sometimes the narrator would provoke Labhu saying that he didn’t believe the tale of a ‘devil ram’, that Labhu was supposed to have seen while hunting in the forest with Subedar Deep Singh.

Labhu would swear that it was true and the Subedar was also a witness, when both of them saw, a terrible apparition of a beast. Labhu describes the beast exaggeratedly as “It was a beast about the size of an elephant, with eyes as big as hen’s eggs and a beard as long as that of Maulvi Shah Din, the priest of the Mosque, only not henna – dyed and red, but blue-black, it had huge ears as big as an elephant’s which did not flap, but pricked up like the ears of the Subedar’s (Deep Singh); it had a nose like that of the wife of the Missionary Sahib, and it had square jaws which showed teeth almost as big as the chunks of marble which lie outside the temple”

Labhu goes on to narrate that he and the Subedar had a sudden encounter with such a beast on the Devi Parbat at twelve thousand feet on the mountain while they were hunting. They had thought that it was an ‘Oorial’ – a Himalayan wild, homed sheep – and started to chase it. But the beast was frightened of them and disappeared into the mountain with a kick of its forefeet. He had stood there bravely while the Subedar trembled with fear. He says that he was fortunate to have seen such a beast – ‘devil – God of the tribe of ranis’. He promised the narrator that one day he would show him such a beast. Although the narrator did not believe Labhu he was fascinated by the chimaera.

Question 13.
How does the story portray caste discrimination?
Answer:
There are many instances of caste discrimination in the short story ‘The Liar’ by Mulk Raj Anand.

“Oh, you are a fool, Labhu” I said, “And you are a liar. Everybody says so. And I don’t believe you at all, My mother says I am silly to believe your tales.”

This insignificant comment by the narrator demonstrates the discrimination between an upper caste child and a lower caste man. The narrater’s ability to belittle Labhu proves that Labhu can never be a legimate authority enough to believe in his fantastic stories. The narrator supports his claim using the views of his upper caste parents and other villagers. The narrator has imbibed the idiosyncratic uppercaste sentiments from this parents. He realizes that the upper caste status of his parents gives them the power to criticize Labhu who is from a lower caste. He recognizes his power as amember of the upper – caste and uses it to belittle Labhu.

In Labhu’s absence from the village he listens attentively to the adults scandalizing Labhu’s expertise as a shikari and a good shooter. The villagers dismiss Labhu as an inconsequential Liar and a vain boaster, though they can’t prove it with frets. The upper caste villagers are tired to put down Labhu, who was a skilled shikari because they were not such good shots as Labhu.

The narrator’s mother tolerated his proximity with Labhu, but she chides the narrator saying that he was silly to believe in the fantastic stories Labhu weaved, which engrossed the ears of all the villagers.

Question 14.
Explain the concept of beauty utilised in the story.
Answer:
In the short story ‘The Liar’by M.R. Anand, the protagonist, Labhu, is the Liar who narrates fantastic and romantic stories to the narrator, a child, about his experiences of hunting. Labhu’s concept of beauty is rather twisted and mostly exaggerated the discretion of fantastical monsters. He makes witty comparisons of the beasts features to selected people from his own village. He gives a vivid description of a beast he had encountered on a hunting trip with Subedhar Deep Singh though his imaginative tales aren’t believable yet they evoke a kind of fascination in the listener. In one instance he gives a vivid discretion o f a beast about the size of an elephant, with as big as hen’s eggs and a beard as long as that of moulvi Shah Din the Imam of the village mosque, only not henna-dyed and red, but blue-black, but pricked up like the ears of the Subedar’s, it had a nose like that of the wife of the Missionary sahib, and it had square Jaws which showed teeth almost as big as the chunks of marble which lie outside the temple.

In another instance, Labhu describes a monster.

Labhu weaved a fantastic fictional story to the narrator when he had asked him about his limp. Labhu was a shikari to Kuldeep Singh and his friends, when they went to Nepal on a hunting trip. On the eighth day they saw a monster that had the body of a wild bear, the head of a reindeer, the feet of a goat, the tail of a wild bull and a glistening, fibrous tissue all round it like the white silken veil which the Rani of Boondi wore when she came to visit Subedar Deep Singh’s wife. Kuldeep Singh and his friends were very frightened of the apparition and said it was the devil himself in the shape of an earthy being and who would soon breathe a breath that would poision the still air on the Himalayas.

They had thought of killing the ghastly beast. But Labhu had stopped them. He was sure it was a princess of a royal house of Nepal who had been transformed by some magician into that fantastic beast. He had desired to catch it alive and transform it back into a princess and marry her. „
He boasted about her beauty and how she had smiled shyly when he had told her that he loved her and desired to marry her. But she ran away frightened when Kuldeep Singh had fired at her and vanished into the thin air of Kailash Parbat.

Question 15.
“Story-telling is an art” How is this brought out in the lesson?
Answer:
Mulk Raj Anand was a prominent Indian author in English. In the given short story ‘The Liar ’ the writer demonstrates the art of storytelling through the fantastical stories woven by Labhu, an old shikari and told to the then young impressionable boy of the village, who is also the narrator of the short story.

The narrator writes that Labhu was a bom Liar and was infamous as the best storyteller in their neighborhood. Labhu belonged to the untouchable sweeper caste, but was praised for his uncanny ability for rendering amazing stories. The narrator’s family did not object his proximity to Labhu.

Labhu was a thin, little man, bright and agile – ‘with the glint of a lance and glide of an arrow”. He was very energetic and could chase stags up the steep boulders of the hills behind their village and could run as fast as Subedur Deep Singh’s horse, He was in Subedar Deep Singh’s service. Sometimes he acted as a Shikari to the Subedar’s guests. He had a sensitive, dark, and expressive face.

The narrator was a big fan of Labhu. Labhu taught the narrator how to browbeat his father when he played all afternoon. The author was an ardent disciple of Labhu.
Once the author, challenged Labhu that it was impossible to track a prey when he was half up the side of a hill lock. Labhu disproved him by tracking a ram up the hillock until he found it hiding in a cave.

Sometimes the narrator would provoke Labhu saying that he didn’t believe the tale of a ‘devil ram’, that Labhu was supposed to have seen while hunting in the forest with Subedar Deep Singh.

Labu would swear that it was true and the Subedar was also a witness, when both of them saw, a terrible apparition of a beast. Labhu describes the beast exaggeratedly as “It was a beast about the size of an elephant, with eyes as big as hen’s eggs and a beard as long as that of Maulvi Shah Din, the priest of the Mosque, only not henna – dyed and red, but blue-black, it had huge ears as big as an elephant’s which did not flap, but pricked up like the ears of the Subedar’s (Deep Singh); it had a nose like that of the wife of the Missionary Sahib, and it had square jaws which showed teeth almost as big as the chunks of marble which lie outside the temple”

Labhu goes on to narrate that he and the Subedar had a sudden encounter with such a beast on the Devi Parbat at twelve thousand feet on the mountain while they were hunting. They had thought that it was an ‘Oorial’ – a Himalayan wild, homed sheep – and started to chase it. But the beast was frightened of them and disappeared into the mountain with a kick of its forefeet. He had stood there bravely while the Subedar trembled with fear. He says that he was fortunate to have seen such a beast – ‘devil – God of the tribe of rams’. He promised narrator the one day he would show him such a beast.

Though the narrator was fascinated by the chimera (illusion) the author did not believe that such a thing existed. Labhu tried to convince the author that such things existed by narrating another superfluous tale of a huge snake, that even he didn’t believe it. The narrator accuses Labhu for being a Liar. Labhu gets angry and vows not to teach him anything more and to take him on hunting trips. The narrator stubbornly tells Labhu that he would never speak to him again and they part ways.

Later, Labhu went for a hunting tour and did not come back for a long time. The narrator regretted Labu’s absence. He eagerly overheard the villagers assassinate Labhu’s character, though they were not as good marksmen as Labhu. They accused him of stalking his prey by the forest pool and shooting it from a safe comer, but they agreed that he was an efficient tracker (of animals). The narrator’s father accused him of being a ‘vain boaster and liar ’, and that the only beast that he shot was a hare and that too in the leg.

The narrator waited eagerly for Labhu’s return so that he could directly ask him if the insinuations of the villagers were true. Labhu returned to the village. He limped about and seemed ill. The narrator was sad at his plight. He seemed broken and dispirited. The narrator pitied him and forgot all the scandals about him. Labhu was not the same talkative man who weaved fantastic stories. He became an introvert and lay unconscious all day, sometimes he limped about with a stick in his hand in the evenings.

He appeared angry and unfriendly, so the narrator avoided going to him. The villagers ignored him. But the narrator could not restrain himself and went to his hut. Labhu was sleeping on a broken string bed under the shade of a peepal tree. They reconciled and Labhu told him that he was away on a hunting tour with the Subedar’s eldest son, Kuldeep Singh to Nepal. He went on to narrate the same rig amoral of his fictitious adventures where he had shot twelve tigers and fifteen panthers and several stags in seven days.

He related this fabulous encounter with a monster with the body of a wild bear, the head of a reindeer, the feet of a goat, the tail of a wild bull, and a glistening, fibrous tissue all round it like the white silken veil which he seen on the Rani of Boondi when she visited Subedar Deep Singh’s wife. All the others were frightened of this apparition thinking it was the devil himself and thought of killing it. But Labhu felt that the monster was a royal princess of Nepal who was under the spell of an evil magician and wanted to catch it alive and marry her. Labu had resolved to transform her back to a princess by reading magical incantations, but the Subedar’s son had fired at it and frightened the creature and she had vanished into the thin air oftheKailashParbat.

He had leaped from mountain to mountain to rescue her, but the shots fired by the others had roused the magician who had cast a spell on her. The angry magician had thrown a huge ball of snow at him, to kill him. But he was not frightened and blew a hot breath at the snowball when it disintegrated into a million pieces and spread about in the sky like glittering stars.

The magician had then stamped the earth with his feet to open up a grave to bury him. But Labhu had leaped across it and found himself on a peak in the land of the immortal lamb.

At last, he found that the magician had hidden the beautiful princess in a cave. But he had given up his mission to save her, fearing death at the hands of the magician. He had returned home by leaping across the Himalayas. The narrator completed Labhus’ fabulous tale by saying, “And as you landed this side of the mountains you sprained your foot”.

Labhu knew he had been found out but being a master storyteller he didn’t accept defeat. He laughed at the narrator’s ingenuity saying, “Have I told you this story before then?” Labhu had a vivid imagination and a willingness to share his imagination with others. His efforts are praise-worthy as his only intention was to entertain and enchant those who listened to him. He was actually not a liar but a gifted storyteller who captivated his listeners with his fantastic stories.

LANGUAGE ACTIVITY

Exercises

Question 1.
Draft a sales letter introducing a new model scooter.

SALES LETTER INTRODUCING NEW MODEL SCOOTER

Rajesh                                                                                                                                                                                     1 Aug 2019
Business Development Manager
Cambridge Scooters (Distributors for Honda scooters)
Bangalore

Vishwa
Senior Sales Manager
Ashwini Motors
Rajajinagar
Bangalore

Dear Sir/Madam

We are glad to introduce you to our new Model Honda Scooter. It is very user-friendly with great new features. This Model Honda Grazia is on the road for the past six months, and we have got positive responses from many of our customers. We will feel glad if you include this model of the Honda scooter in your inventory and help notch up sales and thereby your profits.

We are proud to introduce you to the new features of the new Honda Grazia scooter. It will be Honda’s flagship scooter in India and will have the same engine as the Activa 125. There are a lot of segment-first features in the new scooter such as.

  • Futuristic LED headlamps.
  • Fully digital Meter with Eco Speed indication.
  • Telescopic suspension, contemporary urban design
  • Front Disc brake and combi brake system.
  • Front glove box with mobile charging socket.
  • Sporty split grabrail
  • 4 in 1 lock assembly with a seat switch release
  • Available in six colors
  • 12-inch all-black alloy wheels, stylish tail lamp

It is a Scooter meant for the urban environment and will be introduced in 35 cities by the end of this year.

The scooter segment has seen strong growth over the past few years and we can see projected growth of 91 % in 2019.

We gladly invite inquiries from you. Looking forward to a long-lasting partnership.
Thanking you                                                                                                                                                                   Sincerely
                                                                                                                                                                                       Rajesh

Question 2.
Draft a sales letter introducing a new talcum powder in the market.

SALES LETTER INTRODUCING NEW TALCUM POWDER IN THE MARKET

Shankar                                                                                                                                                                                        1 Aug 2019
Business Development Manager
CAMBRIDGE DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
Bangalore

Mrs.Ambika
Sundari Beauty Products
Rajajinagar
Bangalore

Dear Sir/Madam

We are proud to introduce ourselves as leading distributors of Beauty and Health Care Products in Karnataka. As a part of our product sales drive, we would like to introduce you to a new Talcum Powder launched by Wipro Enterprises (P) Ltd as ‘ Yardley Morning Dew Perfumed Talc’. We can assure you that the new Talcum Powder is tested and safe to use by any individual of any skin type with zero allergic reactions or other side effects.

‘Yardley Morning Dew’ exudes a freshness that lingers from morning through the day’, this was one of a user’s comments received by our research team. It is a fine, silky Luxury Talcum Powder that embraces the vibrant and musky fragrance of white flowers like lily and lotus. This luxurious talcum powder will keep the user fresh, smooth, and scented throughout the day.

The Talcum Powder is composed of proven ingredients such as superfine talk, calcium carbonate, Magnesium carbonate, Fragrance, Dipropylene Glycol, Calcium Silicate, Triciosen (Deofactor) and approved by FTA (India)

We humbly invite you for a trade inquiry and request you to be a stockist for Yardley Talcum Powder.
Thanking You                                                                                                                                                                             Sincerely
                                                                                                                                                                                                   Shankar

Question 3.
Draft a sales letter to promote the sales of a new model refrigerator.

SALES LETTER TO PROMOTE SALES OF NEW MODEL REFRIGERATOR

Mitrajith                                                                                                                                                                                   1 Aug 2019
Cambridge Home Appliances Company
Bangalore

Mrs. Renuka
Easy Life Home Solutions
Bangalore

Dear Sir/Madam
We would like to introduce ourselves as leading distributors of Home Appliances in Karnataka. As a part of our business development drive we are glad to introduce you to a new Model Refrigerator launched by Samsung India, the New Space Max series, side – by-side refrigerator lineup that will be available in two-door and three-door options. Samsung is the market leader in the side-by-side refrigerator category with over 50% market share.

The new refrigerator line-up comes with unique features. The Space Max, technology allows more space to store more food without increasing external dimensions or compromising on energy efficiency. The refrigerator also has a sleek and seamless counter-depth design that will fit perfectly with the dimensions of the consumer’s existing appliances and space to create a harmonious kitchen interior. It is equipped with all – round cooling system tha makes sure food is fresh wherever it is stored in the fridge. These refrigerators are highly energy efficient and durable, ensuring longer-lasting performance. It is also equipped with a Digital Inverter Technology which is certified for a 21 year lifespan durability and 10 year warranty.
Other notable features of this Line – up are

  • Non – Plumbing ice and water dispenser, without being connected to a water supply.
  • Power cool and power freeze for quick cooling and freezing.
  • EZ slide shelf for organizing and helping consumers to access the stored food with ease.

The Space Max series is available at a competitive Market price of 1,16,999 INR to 1,06,990 INR.

We have attached the catalog with the sales letter for your discretion. We gladly invite trade inquiries from you and hopes for a long-lasting business relationship with you.

Thanking you Sincerely
Mithrajith

Question 4.
Draft a sales letter introducing a new product of your concern.

MITHRAJITH DISTRIBUTORS
#9, LAKE STREET
BENGALURU

STORES MANAGER
CAMBRIDGE INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES
BENGALURU

Dear Sir/Madam

Mithrajith Distributors, a Bangalore based distribution company, are proud to introduce ourselves as a team of professionals who understand what customer needs and trying to fulfill those requirements in appropriate span of time with suitable price.

We believe in “Supply quality products at the best prices” We deal in Hardware, Electrical, Cleaning Chemical & Equipment products & general items as per the customer’s requirement.

Our customers belong to Manufacturing industries, oil & gas fields, traders, hotels, hospitals, janitorial cleaning service providers, and construction companies.

We have a complete range of personal safety products, screws fasteners, hand tools, tool sets, tool storage, tapes, cleaning cloths (e.g. cotton cups) and cleaning chemicals (for e.g. floor cleaners, polishes, etc) and industrial oils (lubricant products).

For more information kindly visit our website: www. mithra distributors.com.

We would like to have a business relationship with you and work for your venture. Our company representatives would like to personally meet you and discuss how we could help you.
We are eager to extend our co-operation and share our expertise with you. We look forward to a cordial business relationship with you.

Sincerely
Mithrajit
Proprietor

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