The Roman Image Summary Notes

The Roman Image About the Author

Rasipuram Krishnaswami Iyer Narayanaswami better know as R.K. Narayan was born on October 10 1906 in Chennai. He is one of the three leading figures of early Indian literature in English, along with Mulkraj Anand and Raja Rao. The setting for most of his stories is the fictional town of Malgudi, first introduced in ‘Swami and Friends’. In a writing career that spanned over sixty years, he received many awards and honours.

This short story taken from ‘Under the Banyan Tree’ and Other Stories is about an ambitious Talkative man. He discovers an image on the banks of the Sarayu river, supposedly a statue of the Roman Emperor Tiberius II. The story captures incidents and situations without a hint of contrivance and losing out on the elements of a story.

The Roman Image Summary

The short-story ‘The Roman Image’ is by R. K. Narayan. The main protagonist is an ambitions talkative man, an assistant to an eminent archaeologist, who is addressed as ‘Doctor’. The talkative man begins to narrate his story telling us that he was once an archaeologist’s assistant. He and the archaeologist had roamed the whole country ‘probing, exploring, and digging archaeological sites for historical antiquities. People often teased them as ‘gravediggers’. The talkative man says that he had enjoyed his occupation immensely.

He gives a vivid description of his employer, the archaeologist, simply known as Doctor. He describes him as a “superb, timeless being that lived a thousand years behind the times.” The Doctor had spent all his life digging for artifacts and discovered vital information concerning their history and about the people who made them centuries ago. The monographs (thesis) that the Doctor had written about his excavations filled several shelves in all major libraries.

The Doctor had come to Malgudi district hearing rumours that it had many undiscovered archaeological sites. He had hired the talkative , man after asking him if he knew anything about archaeological history of Malgudi. The narrator was taken aback because he really didn’t know that there were any archaeological sites in Malgudi.

The narrator felt that the proposition of him being hired by the Doctor was at stake and recollected his forgotten knowledge in history and cleverly answered that no efforts had been made to explore the . history of Malgudi but farmers had found ‘old unusual bits of pottery and metal while tilling their fields. The narrator was hired by the Doctor for a princely sum of fifty rupees per month.

The narrator had charmed the Doctor by taking anything that he found to be interesting to him after cleaning and polishing them. Many a time he conned the doctor into believing they were real historical artifacts, though they belonged to modem era.

The narrator reveals that he had once scored a hit. i.e., he had found an authentic historical antiquity. Once, the narrator and the Doctor had camped at Siral – a village about sixty miles from Malgudi. Siral was a lovely ancient town on the banks of Sarayu River, surrounded by a magnificent jungle of bamboo and teak. The Doctor and the narrator were searching for a buried city.

They were in great anticipation because if they found the lost city as it would ‘Push the earliest known civilization three centuries further back and rival Mohenjo-Daro (Indus valley civilization) for its historical antiquity. The doctor had an inexplicable feeling of rivalry with the discoverers of old cities such as Mohenjo- Daro.

While on the dig, the narrator had gone to the river for a bath in the evening after work. Earlier in the day they had found a piece of stained glass picked up in a field outside the village. The Doctor had studied the glass piece and deduced that it was a Florentine glass used in A.D.5.

He wondered how it happened to find its way into a remote village in Malgudi, because it was not usually found elsewhere in the world. He believed that if the identity of the glass-piece was established it would create a revolution in history. He had warned the narrator to be wary as they were on the brink of making a great discovery.

While the narrator was swimming in the river he dived deep inside, when his hand struck against something hard and he picked it up and came to the surface. It was an image and he excitedly took it to the Doctor. The Doctor examined it and joyfully told the narrator that the image gave them an entirely new set of possibilities.
The Doctor examined the image.

It was made of stone and was about a foot high. As it was submerged under water for a many years it appeared to have been polished. There were a few details of ornament and drapery. He declared that it was a Roman statue and wondered how it found its way to Malgudi and decided to investigate it thoroughly.

In the next couple of months their discovery was published in important papers and periodicals in the world. The discovery was discussed all over the archaeological fraternity, and was finally decided that the image was that of Roman Emperor Tiberius II. (Constantine was an Eastern Roman emperor from 574 to 582) The Doctor had also consulted Roman texts which also mentioned Roman links with South-India.

The Doctor and his assistant went around India giving lectures on the Roman image. The talkative man accompanied the Doctor to Madras and began to write a monograph on the Roman image, which was supposed to be a monumental work on history.

The narrator was proud that his name would also be mentioned as a co-author of the volume. The Doctor had entrusted the research work to the narrator and had gone to North-India to finish an incomplete archaeological work.

The narrator had diligently conducted in-depth research sitting in a large library. Gradually he became a recognized personality in learned societies. Many people came to consult him on the recent discovery. His name and his research work were reported in the Media – “Monograph on which he has been working for months now will be ready for the publication in ten days.

It is expected that this is going to make the richest contribution to Indian history. The narrator had worked hard for months and work-weary. The Doctor suggested that he could take three months off from work and relax in any hill-station he pleased to go.

As it is, the narrator had to visit Siral once again, to obtain measurements of the area where he had found the Roman image. While he was working on it, a stranger came and started talking to him. The narrator told him about the Roman image and about the research he had been conducting on it.

The stranger listened to the narrator rather skeptically and wanted to know if the narrator thought that the image was really from Rome. The narrator told the stranger that he was quite sure that the image was definitely from Rome.

The stranger appeared puzzled and told the narrator that if the narrator was sure that the image was found in the river, he could tell him something about it. The stranger asked the narrator if the image he had found was without nose or arm. When the narrator confirmed it, the stranger asked the narrator to follow him and took him through the jungle to a temple in a little village a mile away.

When they stood in front of the temple, the stranger told the narrator that the image he had found in the river belonged to the temple. The stranger and the narrator entered the temple. The temple was dedicated to Goddess Mari. On one side of the sanctum doorway was the image of a dwarapalaka (divine sentry). The stranger pointed to it and told the narrator that the image he had found formed a pair with it.

The narrator was seized by doubt and he examined the dwarapalaka by the flickering light of a wick lamp and found that it exactly resembled the one he had found in the river.

The stranger told the narrator that the image he had found was made by a sculptor from the stone quarried from a hillock beside the village. The stone from that hillock was used to make sculptures which were famous all over the world. The stranger had got the pair of sculptures made for fifty rupees.

The narrator grew sad on hearing this. All his hopes of world renown were dashed. He asked the stranger how the broken image had made it to the river. The stranger narrated the strange story of a delusional priest of the Mari temple.

This priest had inherited the right to perform puja at the temple but he was a drunkard, but he performed all the pujas diligently. Everything was all-right until the pair of dwarapalakas was installed. The priest believed that the dwarapalakas kept a watch over him all the time. He grew paranoid.

His delusion went to such heights that he felt the dwarapalakas butt or kick him. He showed bruises and scratches as evidence to the village elders. To escape from being kicked he armed himself with a mallet (wooden hammer) and retorted whenever he was butted or kicked.

In course of time he had broken a nose, an arm and ear of one of the dwarapalakas. One day, he had furiously knocked the dwarapalaka on the left from its pedestal and carried it down to the river and threw it into its deep waters. The next day, he claimed that he had seen the dwarapalaka walk off to the river and plunge into the water.

The villagers took the priest to court. He was fined and dismissed. The narrator sadly tells us that when he went back to Madars he was a different man. When he told the story to the Doctor, he was furious and exclaimed in sorrow, “we have made ourselves mighty fools before the whole world’.

He asked the narrator to bum the manuscripts and to throw the sculpture into the river where it was first found. But the narrator took it to the beach and threw it into the sea. Later the newspapers reported, “The Manuscript on which Doctor and his assistant were engaged has been destroyed, and the work will be suspended’.

The doctor paid the narrator two months’ salary and went away to his country. The story depicts opportunity, fame, honesty, enthusiasm, reputation, appearance and change. The Doctor and the narrator would have earned greatness. But the unexpected turn of the events destroyed their hopes. Their efforts had been a waste of time, energy and other resources. The narrator had believed that the Roman image would change his life until he had heard the truth about it.

The Roman Image Glossary

  • Archaeology : Study of the ancient and recent human past through material remains
  • Antiquity : relics of monuments of ancient time
  • Dak bungalow: guest house
  • Dwarapalaka : figures of gods placed at the entrance of a temple
  • Monograph : specialist work of writing on a subject
  • Mohenjadaro : an ancient city in Indus Valley Civilization
  • Manuscript : written in hand
  • Hamlet : small village
  • Mallet : hammer
  • Butt : blow
  • Epigraphy : study of inscriptions

The Roman Image Questions And Answers

I. Answer the following questions in one or two sentences each:

Question 1.
How does the Talkative Man re-invent himself?
Answer:
The talkative man re-invents himself by convincing an archae-ologist to hire him as his assistant.

Question 2.
By what other name are archaeologists called?
Answer:
Grave diggers.

Question 3.
What was the duo’s first discovery?
Answer:
A piece of stained glass supposed to be Florentian, which went out of Vogue in A:D. 5.

Question 4.
What did the Talkative Man find in the river?
Answer:
The talkative man found a disfigured stone sculpture in river Sarayu. The Doctor deduced it to be the Image of Roman Emperor Tiberius II.

Question 5.
How did the Talkative Man become popular after finding the statue?
Answer:
The doctor insisted upon giving the talkative man his due share of fame. He came to be looked upon as a sort of saviour of Indian history.

Question 6.
Why did the rustic ask the Talkative Man to follow him to the shrine?
Answer:
The rustic had recognised the statue that the talkative man had found, belonged to the Mari temple in the village. It was one of the pair of dwarapalakas. The temple priest had disfigured the statue and thrown it into the river. The rustic wanted to prove the narrator that the statue didn’t belong to Rome. So he asked the talkative man to follow him to the temple.

Question 7.
What did the doctor suggest to the Talkative Man about the image at the end of the story?
Answer:
The Doctor suggested the talkative man to drown the statue as it was first found in water.

II. Answer the following questions in a short paragraph each:

Question 1.
What were the doctor’s tall claims?
Answer:
The Doctor examined the statue and joyfully declared that it entirely set new possibilities and claimed that it was the statue of Roman Emperor Tiberius II. He decided to probe into the mystery of the statue’s appearance in Malgudi. He claimed that the discovery would give an entirely new turn to Indian history.

Question 2.
Why was the rustic’s information about the image convincing?
Answer:
The rustic’s information was convincing because he took the talkative man to a Mari shrine in the village and showed him the twin of the statue, which was actually the dwarapalaka placed at the door way of sanctum of Goddess Mari.

The narrator also examined the other statue in the temple and was convinced that it was indeed the twin of the statue he had found in the river, but was not disfigured. The rustic revals to the talkative man the tale of a temple priest who was a drunkard and convinces that his information is true.

Question 3.
The Talkative Man was looking for fame, position and money. Did he succeed?
Answer:
The Talkative Man was looking for fame, position and money, but in the end he failed to achieve any of those. When he realized the statue was a dwarapalaka of a Mari temple in a village called Siral in Malgudi district. His efforts were not entirely wasted as he achieved fame and earned a little money, although for a short while.

Question 4.
Contrast the characters of the Doctor, the Talkative Man and the rustic.
Answer:
Doctor : The Doctor in ‘The Roman Image’ is a nameless archaeologist. He is not given an identity other than that of an amus-ing archaeologist. The archaeological profession is called that of ‘grave diggers’. The archaeologist found Malgudi ‘eminetly diggable’.

It is as though he is launched on the exercise of discovering a buried city under the mound of earth of the village of Siral in Malgudi district with a zeal for pushing the earliest known civilization three centuries antiquity. He is a rival to the discoverers of Mohenjodaro.

The archaeologist identifies the statue found by the Talkative Man in the river Sarayu as that of Roman Emperor Tiberius II. The Doctor who is pompous advertises his finding all over the world, even though the image isn’t remotely connected to the Roman empire.

The Doctor is eccentric and he falsely claims that it is the statue of Roman Emperor Tiberius II. At the end of the story the archaeologist learns that he had been made a fool by the rustic’s tale and by his own visions of grandeur.

One is not able to Judge how a master and recognized archaeologist who had tom up the earth in almost all parts of India, who had brought to light very valuable information concerning the history and outlook of people of remote centuries had misjudged the origins of the statue.

When the archaeologist finally leams about the origins of the statue he surreptitiously destroys all the research papers and asks the talkative man to drown the statue in the river, where it originally belonged to, and suspends the research about the statue.

Talkative Man : The central figure of ‘The Roman Image’ is the Talkative Man, a story of archaeology and discovery where his becomes the assistant of an archaeologist. He works hard to gain he’s trust and later discovers the Roman Image , which may change the entire Indian history. He is ambitions and aims to gain fame and wealth. The discovery of the Roman Image brings him fame. He gives, interviews, becomes famous and is about to publish a mono-graph.

But by a twist of fate, the events take a surprising turn where the entire narrative tumbles on its head, when he finds out that the Roman Image is actually a broken dwarapalaka of a local Mari temple, which was mutilated by the hallucinating priest and drowned in river Sarayu.

Although the Talkative Man could have kept the truth about the Roman Image a secret and’ achieved fame and fortune, he was honest and revealed the truth of the origins of the statue to the archaeologist. Thus the Talkative Man’s budding carrer as an archaeologist was nipped in the bud and his dreams of achieving name and fame remained a dream. He had to be satisfied being in the limelight for a short while.

Though the talkative man was ignorant of the history of Malgudi or world history he worked tirelessly and enthiusiastically on his researches about the Roman statue.

Rustic : The Rustic belonged to the village of Siral in Malgudi district. He was a simple unassuming villager. The narrator and the villager met near river Sarayu when the Talkative man had gone there for further research about the Roman statue. When the rustic heard everything the narrator told him about the Roman statue he appeared skeptical about the origins of the statue.

So he took the narrator to the Mari temple to prove the origins of the statue. He narrated the whole story about how the statue found it way into the depths of the Sarayu river. The rustic was guileless, god-fearing and generous yet a man of morals. He was unware of the exact spot in river Sarayu where the priest had thrown the statue.

Question 5.
Why was the image disfigured by the priest?
Answer:
The priest was a drunkard. When the twin statues of the dwarapalakas were added to the Mari temple the priest got a queer notion in his head. He became delusional. He imagined that the two doorkeepers constantly harried him in the neck. Sometimes he imagined that they were watching him. His delusion grew to such an extent that he imagined that they butted him and kicked him and pulled his hair.

He was afraid to take his eyes of the idols. If he had his eye on one idol the other knocked him from behind. He carried a mallet with him and whenever he got a knock he returned the blow, sometimes he hit the idol on its nose or arm and at other times on the ear and disfigured the idols. One day he knocked the left dwarapalaka from its pedestal and took it the river and drowned it.

III. Answer the following questions in a page each:

Question 1.
“This is easily the most important piece of work which has come under my notice”. Comment on the master’s work.
Answer:
The master was a famous archaeologist called Doctor something or other. He was a superb, timeless being, who lived a thousand years behind the times, and who wanted neither food nor roof nor riches if only he was allowed to gaze on undisturbed at an old coin or chip of a burial urn. He had tom up the earth in almost all parts of India and had brought to light very valuable information concerning the history and outlook of people of remote centuries.

His monographs on each of his excavations filled several shelves in all important libraries. When the narrator first met him he was sitting on the floor with the craziest collection of articles in front of him – pots and beads and useless coins and palm leaves, all of them rusty and decaying. He examined over the articles with a magnifying glass and made notes.

The archaeologist had come to Malgudi to excavate for historical evidences. One day, the narrator and the Doctor had been scouting the surroundings of the Siral village for a mound undei whicu was supposed to be a buried city. If they ever found the buried city, the discovery was going to push the earliest known civilization three centuries further back and rival Mohenjodaro in antiquity. The doctor had an inexplicable feeling of rivalry with the discoverers of Mohenjodaro.

They had found a piece of stained glass in a field outside die village. The Doctor had examined the glass piece for a whole day and then declared that it was easily the most important piece of work which had come under his notice and that it was a piece of Florentian glass which went out of Vogue in A.D.

The Doctor had pondered on it and wondered how it happened to found in a remote village in India because it was not found anywhere else in the world. He declared that if the identity of the glass piece was established, it would revolutionize people’s knowledge of history. He warned the Talkative man to be wary and not to overlook the slightest evidence as he believed that they were on the eve of greatest discoveries.

During their stint at the village, the Talkative man had discovered a disfigured stone statue in the depths of the Sarayu river. After the Doctor had examined the statue the whole night and declared that it was a Roman statue. He decided to investigate and find evidence of its appearence in a remote village in India.

In the next two months most important archaeological journals all over the world had published details of the discovery. And after many discussion it was finally decided that the statue was that of Roman Emperor Tiberius II.

The archaeologist had entrusted the research work regarding the statue to the Talkative Man. But fate had other plans. One of the villager’s of Siral hold the truth about the stone statue. He disclosed that the stone statue was the Dwarapalaka – body-guard of deity Mari and belonged to the local Mari temple.

The archaeologist was furious to know the truth. He admitted that he had made himself a fool before whole world. So to retain his reputation intact he asked the Talkative Man to drown the statue and announced to the world that the manuscript on which he and his assistant were engaged had been destroyed, and the work will be suspended.

Question 2.
How does the Talkative Man’s description of himself, his master and Malgudi engross the reader?
Answer:
Talkative Man : The Talkative Man is an invention of the writer R. K. Narayan. The story ‘The Roman Image’ is narrated by the Talkative Man. The story is narrated as a satire. It satarizes the research activities related to archaeology. The Talkative Man of Malgudi talks about his experience of working with an archaeologist and how he was on the verge of getting name and fame but destiny had some other comedy in mind.

The Talkative Man tells us that he was once an archaeologist’s assistant and wandered up and down the country probing; exploring and digging, in search of antiquities. He found that archaeology was an interesting occupation, although cynics sometimes called his em-ployer, the doctor and him as ‘grave-digger’. The Talkative Man says that he had enjoyed his work immensely.

The narrator was desperate. He wanted to become famous and also rich. As soon as he had heard that a famous archaeologist had camped in Malgudi and needed an assistant, he ran to him.

He describes the archaeologist as a superb, timeless being who lived thousand years behind the times. He would always be engrossed in historical artefacts and wanted neither food nor roof nor riches. This archaeologist had tom up the earth in a almost all parts of India to gather historical evidences. The narrator exaggerates that the monographs written by the Doctor would fill up a large library.

The description of his first meeting with the archaeologist is quite amusing. He says that the archaeologist was sitting on the floor with some craziest collection of articles in front of him such as pots, beads and useless coins and palm leaves, all of the rusty and decaying.

The Doctor was examining the articles through a magnifying glass and making notes. He had hired the talkative man after asking him if he knew anything about archaeological history of Malgudi. The narrator was taken aback because he really didn’t know that there were any archaeological sites in Malgudi.

The narrator felt that the proposition of him being hired by the Doctor was at stake and recollected his forgotten knowledge in history and cleverly answered that no efforts had been made to explore the history of Malgudi but farmers had found ‘old unusual bits of pottery and metal while tilling then- fields. The narrator was hired by the Doctor for a princely sum of fifty rupees per month.

The narrator had charmed the Doctor by taking anything that he found to be interesting to him after cleaning and polishing them. Many a time he conned the doctor into believing they were real historical artifacts, though they belonged to modem era.

The narrator reveals that he had once scored a hit. i.e., he had found an authentic historical antiquity. Once, the narrator and the Doctor had camped at Siral – a village about sixty miles from Malgudi. Siral was a lovely ancient town on the banks of Sarayu River, surrounded by a magnificent jungle of bamboo and teak. The Doctor and the narrator were searching for a buried city.

They were in great anticipation because if they found the lost city as it would ‘Push the earliest known civilization three centuries further back and rival Mohenjo-Daro (Indus valley civilization) for its historical antiquity. The doctor had an inexplicable feeling of rivalry with the discoverers of old cities such as Mohenjo-Daro.

While on the dig, the narrator had gone to the river for a bath in the evening after work. Earlier in the day they had found a piece of stained glass picked up in a field outside the village. The Doctor had studied the glass piece and deduced that it was a Florentine glass used in A.D.5.

He wondered how it happened to find its way into a remote village in Malgudi, because it was not usually found elsewhere in the world. He believed that if the identity of the glass-piece was established it would create a revolution in history. He had warned the narrator to be wary as they were on the brink of making a great discovery.

While the narrator was swimming in the river he dived deep inside, when his hand struck against something hard and he picked it up and came to the surface. It was an image and he excitedly took it to the Doctor. The Doctor examined it and joyfully told the narrator that the image gave them an entirely new set of possibilities.

The Doctor examined the image. It was made of stone and was about a foot high. As it was submerged under water for a many years it appeared to have been polished. There were a few details of ornament and drapery. He declared that it was a Roman statue and wondered how it found its way to Malgudi and decided to investigate it thoroughly.

In the next couple of months their discovery was published in important papers and periodicals in the world. The discovery was discussed all over the archaeological fraternity, and was finally decided that the image was that of Roman Emperor Tiberius II. (Constantine was an Eastern Roman emperor from 574 to 582) The Doctor had also consulted Roman texts which also mentioned Roman links with South-India.

The Doctor and his assistant went around India giving lectures on the Roman image. The talkative man accompanied the Doctor to Madras and began to write a monograph on the Roman image, which was supposed to be a monumental work on history. The narrator was proud that his name would also be mentioned as a co-author of the volume. The Doctor had entrusted the research work to the narrator and had gone to North-India to finish an incomplete archaeological work.

The narrator had diligently conducted in-depth research sitting in a large library. Gradually he became a recognized personality in learned societies. Many people came to consult him on the recent discovery. His name and his research work were reported in the Media – “Monograph on which has been working for months now will be ready for the publication in ten days.

It is expected that this is going to make the richest contribution to Indian history. The narrator had worked hard for months and work-weary. The Doctor suggested that he could take three months off from work and relax in any hill-station he pleased to go.

As it is, the narrator had to visit Siral once again, to obtain measurements of the area where he had found the Roman image. While he was working on it, a stranger came and started talking to him. The narrator told him about the Roman image and about the research he had been conducting on it.

The stranger listened to the narrator rather skeptically and wanted to know if the narrator thought that the image was really from Rome. The narrator told the stranger that he was quite sure that the image was definitely from Rome.

The stranger appeared puzzled and told the narrator that if the narrator was sure that the image was found in the river, he could tell him something about it. The stranger asked the narrator if the image he had found was without nose or arm. When the narrator confirmed it, the stranger asked the narrator to follow him and took him through the jungle to a temple in a little village a mile away.

When they stood in front of the temple, the stranger told the narrator that the image he had found in the river belonged to the temple. The stranger and the narrator entered the temple. The temple was dedicated to Goddess Mari. On one side of the sanctum doorway was the image of a dwarapalaka (divine sentry). The stranger pointed to it and told the narrator that the image he had found formed a pair with it.

The narrator was seized by doubt and he examined the dwarapalaka by the flickering light of a wick lamp and found that it exactly resembled the one he had found in the river. The stranger told the narrator that the image he had found was made by a sculptor from the stone quarried from a hillock beside the village.

The stone from that hillock was used to make sculptures which were famous all over the world. The stranger had got the pair of sculptures made for fifty rupees. The narrator grew sad on hearing this.

All his hopes of world renown were dashed. He asked the stranger how the broken image had made it to the river. The stranger narrated the strange story of a delusional priest of the Mari temple. This priest had inherited the right to perform puja at the temple but he was a drunkard, but he performed all the pujas diligently.

Everything was all-right until the pair of dwarapalakas was installed. The priest believed that the dwarapalakas kept a watch over him all the time. He grew paranoid. His delusion went to such heights that he felt the dwarapalakas butt or kick him.

He showed bruises and scratches as evidence to the village elders. To escape from being kicked he armed himself with a mallet (wooden hammer) and retorted whenever he was butted or kicked. In course of time he had broken a nose, an arm and ear of one of the dwarapalakas.

One day, he had furiously knocked the dwarapalaka on the left from its pedestal and carried it down to the river and threw it into its deep waters. The next day, he claimed that he had seen the dwarapalaka walk off to the river and plunge into the water.

The villagers took the priest to court. He was fined and dismissed. The narrator sadly tells us that when he went back to Madars he was a different man. When he told the story to the Doctor, he was furious and exclaimed in sorrow, “we have made ourselves mighty fools before the whole world’.

He asked the narrator to burn the manuscripts and to throw the sculpture into the river where it was first found. But the narrator took it to the beach and threw it into the sea. Later the newspapers reported, “The Manuscript on which Doctor and his assistant were engaged has been destroyed, and the work will be suspended’.

The doctor paid the narrator two months’ salary and went away to his country.

Question 3.
Discuss how the story blends reality with elements of fantasy and the supernatural.
Answer:
‘The Roman Image’ by R. K. Narayan blends reality with elements of fantasy and the supernatural is a skilful manner.

The episode in which the Talkative Man and the Archaeologist scout for ancient archaeological sites in a village named Siral, an historical place appears realistic. They were scouting for a mound under which was supposed to be a buried city. The discovery would push the earliest known civilization three centuries father back and rival Mohenjodaro in antiquity.

There they find piece of stained glass. After studying the piece of glass, the archaeologist deduces that it was a Florention which was in vogue in A.D.S. But the question was how it came to be found in a remote village in India because it was not found anywhere else in the world. This episode is intriquing and fantastical. If the identity of the glass piece was established it would revolutionize the knowledge of history.

While they were staying in Siral, the narrator had gone to the river have a swim. Being a good diver he planged to the story depths of river Sarayu. He found a disfigured stone image. He brought it to the archaeologist. After examining it thoroughly the archaeologist declared that it was the image of Roman Emperor Tiberius II.

The narrator and the arcaeologist became world famous after the discovery. But unfortunately the truth was that the idol belonged to the Mari Temple of Siral. The delusional priest of the temple had disfigured it and thrown into the river.

R. K. Narayan weaves the element of supernatural into the story. We learn that the stone image was actually one of the twin idols of dwarapalakas of the Mari temple of Siral. The actual story of how the stone image came to be at the bottom of river Sarayu is narrated by the village rustic who had got the twin dwarapalakas sculpted and installed in the temple. The real story was that the priest of the temple was a drunkard. After the idols were installed he imagined that they were constantly watching over him.

He because delusional and often imagined that the idol on the left punished him by kicking him and pulling at his hair. The priest would wreak revenge by hitting back at the idol with a wooden mallot. The idol on the left bore the brunt of his rage the most. One day in rage, the priest had disloged the idol on the left and carried it and flung it into the River Sarayu. He had sunk to the bottom of the river where it stayed until the narrator found it.

Both the narrator and the archaeologist dreams of achieving fame and wealth were tragically dashed.

The Roman Image Remidial Grammar

Jumbled Sentences

Task :
Rearrange the following words and phrases to form meaningful sentences :

Question 1.
They / green / shoots / maize / put / before / a sheaf of/the horse
Answer:
They put a sheaf of green maize shoots before the horse.

Question 2.
The well / walked towards / the head / the steps / constable /of
Answer:
The head constable walked towards the steps of the well.

Question 3.
Listening III was / intently / to / between / this / Anna/ the head constable / dialogue / and
Answer:
I was intently listening to this dialogue between Anna and the head constable.

Question 4.
Several hundred / passing / there were / of them / at this moment
Answer:
There were several hundred of them passing at this moment.

Question 5.
The load / although / was light / the old man / too much/ it / for / was
Answer:
Although the load was light it was too much for the old man.

Question 6.
Which enables / to understand / us / reading / is a skill/ a written text
Answer:
Reading is a skill which enables us to understand a written text.

Question 7.
Communication / this / an / form / effective / of / is
Answer:
This is an effective form of communication.

Question 8.
Submarine earthquake / if / occurs / the earthquake / on the sea floor, / it is called / a
Answer:
If the earthquake occurs on the sea floor it is called a submarine earthquake.

Question 9.
DNA / one percent / humans / differs / just over / only / by / chimpanzees / and / of
Answer:
DNA of humans and chimpanzees differs by just over only one percent.

Question 10.
Geometry, arithmetic / the origins of / and algebra / go back to / in India / remote periods
Answer:
The origins of Geometry and arithmetic in India go back to remote periods.

Forms of Words

I. Write the suitable forms of words given in brackets and fill in the blanks :

  1. The examination was made easy by the examiner.
  2. I was saddened by the sadness around me.
  3. The students were very happy to read the text which gave happiness to the teacher.
  4. The colourful flowers added a new colourfulness to the flower show. The kids took their colour pencils to draw the pictures.
  5. The multilingual actor showed his acting skills in the five-act play which was an act filled drama.
  6. Terrorism is an act of terrorist.
  7. Man has invented many scientific gadgets using his knowledge of science. The science in man will resolve complex issues scientifically.

II. Fill in the blanks with the appropriate forms of words given in brackets using the suffixes – ly, ness, er, able, ful. Watch out for some tricky ones!

(slow, kind, play, honour, wonder)

  1. The traffic was slow in the morning and the vehicles moved slowly.
  2. The honour of inviting the honoured guest was mine.
  3. The kindness shown by the kind hearted person was divine.
  4. The player got the award for fair play.
  5. I was filled with a sense of wonder when the wonderful opportunity came my way.
  6. The playful attitude among children will vanish as they mature playfully.
  7. The player has a playful rapport with all his team members.

III. Construct meaningful sentences using the words and phrases given below:

  1. Lynched (killed) : The irate mob lynched the child-lifter.
  2. Unscrupulous (unprincipled) : The unscrupulous doctor lied about the benefits of the surgery.
  3. Malice (ill-will): We should help one and all without any malice in our heart.
  4. Sparkle (shine brightly with flashes of light) – (Vivacity or wit) : There was a mysterious sparkle in her eyes.
  5. Inquest (A judical inquiry – investigation) : After the initial inquest the cook was charged for the murder.
  6. Breathtaking (magnificient) : The view of the mountains from our lodge was breath-taking.
  7. Combat (battle, fight, wage war) : The narcotics wing of the police are leaving no stone unturned to combat the drug menace.
  8. Virtue (a good moral quality in a person) : Discretion is a virtue worth cultivating.
  9. Deplorable (extremely bad or unfortunate) : The condition of Bengaluru roads is deplorable, they are virtually unmotorable.
  10. Chaos (complete disorder and confusion) : The accident on the highway threw the traffic into complete chaos.

English Summary

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