Tightrope Summary Notes

Tightrope About the Author

Kanu Acharya writes fiction on Adivasi life and has also written biographies in Gujarati. This story highlights the life of marginalized around Gujarat. His works are known for realistic values. His subtle humor and the language are the strength of his works.

Translator :
Rupalee Burke is Head of the Department of English in a college at Ahmedabad. She uses her writing / translation skills in English, Gujarati, and Hindi for cultural activism. She has a number of publications to her credit including research papers and various collections of Gujarati poetry, short stories and drama in English translation. Her Gujarati and Hindi translations of the Quebec Declaration of Literary Translation and Translators have recently been uploaded on the PEN International site.

Tightrope Summary

The short-story ‘TIGHTROPE’ is by Kanu Acharya written in Gujarati. It is translated into English by Rupalee Burke. The story highlights the life of marginalized around Gujrat. The protagonist of the story is Paba, an adivasi boy who belongs to the tribe of ‘bajania’s’ – street-performers. Though Paba is an • adivasi, we come to know that he attends to school regularly. We learn that he was a bright student.

Paba’s father and his brother Tago were street-performers. The on-looker’s would be fascinated by their performances and showed their appreciation by exclaiming “Wah bajania, what a feat”. The story begins with the teachers asking Paba, “Tell me what happens when one doesn’t take a balanced diet?” It is ironical and absurd to ask a poor adivasi boy about balanced diet, when his family can’t afford even a square meal a day.

Paba was staring at the blackboard and wondering, ‘How much to eat in one meal? Moming + Aftemoon + Evening. The writer subtly implies that Paba probably ate one meal every day – Morning+Aftemoon+Evening. He asks his class-mate a boy named Baka to tell him what cashew nuts, almonds and pistachios meant and how did one identify them. We can guess that poor Paba had not seen or eaten cashew or almonds or pistachios ever in his life nor fruits.

Paba stood up to answer the teacher’s questions about the balanced diet. He was in a pathetic situation similar to ‘the flame of an oil lamp which is near extinguishment when the wind blows’ but he managed to answer that if one doesn’t get a balanced diet he’ll end up like his mother.

The teacher was swayed by this clever answer and praised him. The teacher then asked Paba to describe the nature of his mother’s ailment. Paba told him that his mother had lost weight and is reduced to skin and bones and is seized by wracking cough, day and night.

The teacher explained that his mother suffered from vitamin deficiency and most women in India were deficient in hemoglobin. The teacher explained that to increase the hemoglobin in the blood one has to eat a balanced diet consisting of carbohydrates, fat, protein, iron, calcium, phosphorous, zinc, calcium phosphorous, zinc, magnesium, potassium, fiber etc. Paba couldn’t comprehend how one can eat so much food.

He realized that the lack of a balanced diet was the cause of his mother’s weight loss. He hurried home and narrated all that his teacher had taught him. He proudly announced to her that he had found a cure for her weight loss and that she should drink a glass of milk everyday and the calcium in the milk would makes her bones and body strong.

His mother was awed at his knowledge and proudly told him that he sounded like a doctor. Paba then urged his mother to eat roti, puri, dal, rice, vegetables and fruits to become strong again. His mother wondered if all that could only be eaten in the course of a month and certainly could not be eaten on a daily basis. The next day the teacher asked the students if they all promised to eat a balanced diet. Everyone raised their hands except Paba.

The writer ironically writes that the teacher wiped the blackboard clean and everything written about balanced diet was gone and so was Paba’s resolve to make his mother eat a balanced diet.

Paba’s friend Jatinda warned him that his mother would die prematurely if she was not fed a balanced diet. That evening Paba went to the green grocer with the intention to steal some fruits but had to return empty handed because the greengrocer had kept a watchful eye on him. After he returned home he found a banana in his new compass-box and wondered where it had come from. He felt he was walking on a -‘tightrope’. He recalled the incident where his brother, Tago had made him walk a tight rope. He had felt dizzy and had fallen down.

When he offered the banana to his mother his mother was alarmed as if she had seen a snake and asked him where he had got the banana from. He told her that he had found it in his school bag. His mother warned him “Son, if you eat what you haven’t earned blood in your body will turn to water’. He apologized and forced her to eat the banana.

Next day Janti asked Paba why he didn’t take his mother to the hospital. The narrator, Paba felt that Janti was trying to bond with him and replied harshly that he shouldn’t be bothered about his mother’s health as he wasn’t related to them. That evening Paba found a cucumber and a banana in his school-bag.

When he offered them to his mother, she was bewildered and asked him if salad grew in his bag. She suspected he was stealing them. She made him stand in front of their family deity mother Goddess Vahanavati and prayed her to forgive her son stealing fruits.

Tightrope Glossary

  • Nudge : to push with elbow
  • Menace : harmful. evil, annoy
  • Giggle : to lough for silly reasons
  • Extinguish : to put out flame
  • Recite : repeat words from memory
  • Tremble : quick short movements through fear / cold / weakness
  • Shrugged : to raise and contract
  • Bloat : swollen
  • Miffed : irritable mood
  • Filch : to steal
  • Dizzy : giddiness, foolish
  • Bewilderment : confusing
  • Hoard : supply / accumulation / preserve
  • Intimidated : fill with fear, timid
  • Growl : deep guttural sound of anger or hostility
  • Ill-gotten : to cause, generate

Tightrope Questions And Answers

I. Answer the following in one or two sentences

Question 1.
The topic discussed by teacher is _________.
Answer:
diet.

Question 2.
Who is Tago?
Answer:
Tago was Paha’s elder brother.

Question 3.
Why was Paba worried about his mother?
Answer:
Paba was worried because his mother sick and weak due to lack of proper nutrition. He was afraid his mother would die pre¬maturely. She had drastically lost weight and she couldn’t sleep at night due to nagging cough. She was all skin and bones.

Question 4.
How can the deficiency of haemoglobin be cured?
Answer:
The deficiency of haemoglobin can be cured by having a bal-anced diet rich in carbohydrates, fat, protin, iron, calcium, phospho-rous, Zinc, Magnesium, potassium, fibre etc.

Question 5.
Vahanvati is the Goddess of _________.
Answer:
banivas.

Question 6.
What did Janti tell about Paha’s sick mother?
Answer:
Janti told Paba that he should give good things to his mother to cat, otherwise she would die prematurely.

Question 7.
Why did Paba go to a grocer?
Answer:
Paba was taught in school that Bananas were full of calcium. When his class teacher had explained that lack of balanced-diet makes people weak and sick, he understood that his mother had grown weak sue to lack of proper nutrition and that it had caused the deficiency of haemoglobin in his mother. He did not have the means to buy bananas for his mother. So he went to the grocer to with the intention of stealing a banana for his mother.

Question 8.
What did Paba see in his bag on the second day?
Answer:
A cucumber and a banana.

Question 9.
How did Janti’s face look like?
Answer:
Papad.

Question 10.
What was the profession of Paba’s father?
Answer:
A bajania or street-performer.

Question 11.
Why did Paba go to Janti’s house?
Answer:
One day Janti didn’t come to play with Paba, so he went to his house to call him.

Question 12.
What did Janti fear of Paba’s mother?
Answer:
Janti feared that Paba’s mother would die prematurely and he too would have a step-mother like himself.

II. Answer the following in 80-100 words :

Question 1.
Why was it difficult for Paba to accept that the diet plan for one day?
Answer:
At school, the teacher was explaining the students about a bal-anced diet, and what would happen if one doesn’t take a balanced diet. Paba could not comprehend how one could accommodate so much food in one plate. He could make himself believe that all the food mentioned in the diet plan could be eaten on a daily basis.

Question 2.
What was the lesson taught to the children?
Answer:
The lesson taught to the children was about balanced diet. The teacher was explaining the students, what happens when one doesn’t take a balanced diet. The teacher had made a list of Catables that a person should eat in the morning, afternoon and evening.

The teacher had told the students that a wholesome diet consisted of vegetables, fruits, nuts, salads etc. He had explained which nutrient is found in which food and which disease is caused by the deficiency of which of them. He asked, Paba to tell him what happened when one doesn’t take a balanced diet.

Paba was speech-less, because he was not listening attentively to the teache. He blurted out that if one doesn’t get a balanced diet he’ll end up like his mother, who had grown weak due to malnutrition. The teacher made an example of his mother to explain the chareteristics of the diseases occuring due to Mal-nutrition. He asked Paba to describe the char-acteristics of his mothers illness. Paba told him that his mother had drastically lost weight and that she cannot sleep at night due a nag-ging cough. She had been reduced to skin and bones.

The teachers asked the class as to which dificiency leads to low blood count and weight loss and which food should be eaten to make up for it. He explained that Paba’s mother was deficient in haemoglobin, like most women in India. He told that that eating a diet rich in carbohydrates, fat Protien, iron, calcium, phosphorous, zinc, magnesium, potassium, fiber, etc.

Question 3.
Why was Paba perplexed by the diet plan explained by the teacher?
Answer:
It is ironical and absurd to ask a poor adivasi boy about bal-anced diet, when his family can’t afford even a square meal a day. Paba was staring at the blackboard and wondering, ‘How much to eat in one meal? Moming + Aftemoon + Evening. The writer subtly implies that Paba probably ate one meal every day – Morning + Afternoon + Evening. He asks his class-mate a boy named Baka to tell him what cashew nuts, almonds and pistachios meant and how did one identify them. We can guess that poor Paba had not seen or eaten cashew or almonds or pistachios ever in his life nor fruits.

Question 4.
When were Paba’s father and his brother Tago exclaimed ‘Wahbajanias’ by people?
Answer:
Paba’s father and his brother Tago were street-performers. The on-looker’s would be fascinated by their performances and showed their appreciation by exclaiming “Wah bajania, what a feat”.

Paba’s father used to rotate a plate on one finger and then pass it on to his other finger and then pass it on to his other finger. It was a wonderful sight to see the plate spinning like a top on one fingure. His father would then transfer it atop a smooth-ended wooden pole and balance it on his teeth.

Paba’s brother Tago would run on a rope then stand on the plate and slide it along the rope from one end to the other. The on-lookers would be wonderstruck. Then women shriek out in panic. The on-lookers would show their admiration and Cheered them for the fantastic feat and exclaim “Wah bajania, what a feat!”.

Question 5.
Narrate the incident of Goddess Vahanvati’s curse.
Answer:
Goddess Vahanavati was the deity of fishermen. The fisher¬men and the bajanias were originally banias but the clan divided into two groups, due to the curse of Mother Vahanavati. The story goes that once, two bania brothers went fishing in the sea. While return¬ing back with their loaded boat the sea turned stormy and they feared the boat would capsize. They prayed to Goddess Vahanavati to save their life pledging all their fishes. Goddess Vahanavati rescued them.

One of the brothers forgot his promise, but the other fulfilled it. God¬dess Vahanavati cursed them to have a life of nomads without a roof over their heads. Due to the curse they had been living like gypsies performing rope-tricks. Over the time people referred to them as ‘bajanias’.

Question 6.
Janti was beaten by Paba. Mention two reasons.
Answer:
Janti or Jatinda had the habit of teasing Paba daily. He teased Paba saying that the Vania or Bajania’s eat roasted papad and then drink water from the trough and become bloated. Paba had a grudge because Janti made fun of their poverty as they couldn’t offered even a square meal a day.

The second reason for Paba to beat Janti was that Janti was secretly slipping eatables into his school bag, daily. Paba, found this mysterious but he offered the eatables to this mother. His mother grew suspicious and thought that he was stealing the bananas and cucumbers or the lemons, that Janti had slipped into his school bag. Though he confessed that he did not know how the eatables came to be in his school bag, his mother did not believe him.

She made him stand before the idol of their clan deity Goddess Vanahavati and made him beg the Goddess forgiveness. She adviced him that if one eat’s what one hasn’t earned the blood in the body will turn to water. Paba found out the Janti was hiding eatables in his school bag. He confronted Janti and flattened his face into a Papad, in anger because he thought that Janti was trying to frame him for stealing the eatables.

Question 7.
Why did Paba call Janti’s mother ‘female viper’?
Answer:
After Paba and Janti compromised they became very good friends. They would spend their time together daily at school recess and also play together in the evening after school. One day, when Janti did not come over to play, Paba grew apprehensive and went to his house. Janti’s mother shouted at him saying, “You ill-begotten fat- so, why doesn’t the devil take you? You want to idle away all day long. You have come to tie my son’s bier (a platform on which dead body is placed before burial).

Paba was extremely saddened and hot tears trickled down his cheeks. Janti’s mother scolded her son for having become friendly with a low-caste boy. Janti hurried to him and dragged him away. He pleaded Paba not to come to his house ever again.

Paba couldn’t tolerate his anger. He asked Janti, “Is this your mother or a female viper?” Janti’s mother was dead. His father had re-married. He explains Paba that if his mother dies, he too will have a cruel step-mother like him. He reveals why he had been secretly placing eatables in Paba’s school bag. He didn’t want Paba’s mother to die of mal-nourishment. He really wanted Paba not to suffer under a step-mother like himself.

III. Answer the following in 200-250 words :

Question 1.
What is the significance of the title ‘Tightrope’? How is it used as a technique to relate in various contexts in the story?
Answer:
Paba belonged to a family of poor street-performers. His father and elder brother Tago, moved from place to place performing rope- tricks. They earned a very meagre income which was not enough to feed the family even a square meal a day. Due to lack of adequate nutrition his mother had lost weight and was reduced to mere skin and bones.

His school-mate Janti belonged to higher-caste society. He Pittied Paba for his poverty and showed his concern for Paba’s mother by secretly slipping eatables into Paba’s school bag. Janti’s mother was dead and his father had re-married. His step-mother was a vicious lady and deplored his friendship with Paba, a low- caste Bajania.

Though his mother needed the eatables that Janti slipped into Paba’s school bag, she thought that her son was stealing them to keep her healthy. She made him pledge before Goddess Vahanavathi’s idol that he would not ever steal again.

One day Paba found out that Janti was the person who had secretly slipped eatables into his school bag. He grew angry and beat Janti’s face into a Papad. Later he came to know that Janti’s mother was dead and his step-mother was a vicious women. Janti explained Paba the real reason why he had been slipping eatables into his school bag. It was because he didn’t want him to lose his mother due to mal-nutrition and save him the suffering at the hands of a step-mother.

Paba felt as if he was walking a tight-rope, one end of which was held by Janti. He closed his eyes in humiliation and shame for having accused Janti trying to frame him as a thief. He had mis-read Janti’s good intentions and was sorry for having thrashed him badly.

The various situations that Paba had to face in his young life is similar to the ‘Tightrope’ act of the street performers. One slip of the foot, they might lose their limbs or even life. The author has effectively portrayed the lives of street-performers, the social / conditions and the social discrimination they go through in the short- story.

Question 2.
How is the social situation depicted in the story?
Answer:
In the short story ‘Tightrope’, Kanu Acharya, highlights the life of marginalized people in a very realistic manner. Paba belonged to a family of poor street-performers. His father and elder brother Tago, moved from place to place performing rope-tricks. They earned a very meagre income which was not enough to feed the family even a square meal a day. Due to lack adequate nutrition his mother had lost weight and was reduced to mere skin and bones.

His school-mate Janti belonged to higher-caste society. He Pittied Paba for his poverty and showed his concern for Paba’s mother by secretly slipping eatables into Paba’s school bag. Janti’s mother was dead and his father had re – married. His step mother and was a vicious lady and deplored his friendship with Paba, a low-caste Bajania.

Though his mother needed the eatables that Janti slipped into Paba’s school bag, she thought that her son was stealing them to keep her healthy. She made him pledge before Goddess Vahanavathi’s idol that he would not steal ever again.

One day Paba found out that Janti was the person who had secretly slipped eatables into his school bag. He grew angry and beat Janti’s face into a Papad. Later he came to know that Janti’s mother was dead and his step-mother was a vicious women. Janti explained Paba the real reason why he had been slipping eatables into his school bag. It was because he didn’t want him to lose his mother due to mal-nutrition and save him the suffering at the hands of a step-mother.

Paba felt as if he was walking a tight-rope, one end of which was held by Janti. He closed his eyes in humiliation and shame for having accused Janti trying to frame him as a thief. He had mis-read Janti’s good intentions and was sorry for having thrashed him badly.

The various situations that Paba had to face in his young life is similar to the ‘Tightrope’ act of the street performers. One slip of the foot, they might lose their limbs or even life. The author has effectively portrayed the lives of street-performers, the social conditions and the social discrimination they go through in the short- story.

At school Paba learnt that only a balanced diet would keep a man healthy. He also learnt that people suffered many diseases due to tack of adequate nutrition. He understood that the lack of proper nutrition was the reason for his mother’s illness. But he was helpless, as the family had no means to have a nutritions diet. Even his best friend Janti had the daily habit of teasing him. He would say the vanias or Bajania’s would not have enough to eat. They only ate roasted papad and drink water to fill their bellies, and that is why they appear bloated.

One day, Paba intended to steal a banana for his mother, he stood before the grocer’s shop waiting for a long time for a opportunity a steal a banana. But the shopkeeper was not busy. Paba enquired about the prices of the fruits. The shopkeeper was miffed and angrily told him to go away and not to waste his time he didn’t intend to buy anything.

Question 3.
The class structure is again and again depicted through various incidents. Substantiate.
Answer:
The short story ‘Tightrope’ by Kanu Acharya begins with the teacher. It is ironical and absurd to ask a poor adivasi boy about balanced diet, when his family can’t afford even a square meal a day. Paba was staring at the blackboard and wondering, ‘How much to eat in one meal? Moming+Aftemoon+Evening. The writer subtly implies that Paba probably ate one meal every day – Moming+Aftemoon+Evening. He asks his class-mate a boy named Baka to tell him what cashew nuts, almonds and pistachios meant and how did one identify them.

We can guess that poor Paba had not seen or eaten cashew or almonds or pistachios ever in his life nor fruits. The protagonist of the story is Paba, an adivasi boy who belongs to the tribe of ‘bajania’s’ – street-performers. Though Paba is an adivasi, we come to know that he attends to school regularly. We leam that he was a bright student. Paba’s father and his brother Tago were street-performers. The on-looker’s would be fascinated by their performances and showed their appreciation by exclaiming “Wah bajania, what a feat”.

Paba’s father used to rotate a plate on one finger and then pass it on to his other finger and then pass it on to his other finger. It was a wonderful sight to see the plate spinning like a top on one finger. His father would then transfer it atop a smooth-ended wooden pole and balance it on his teeth.

Paba’s brother Tago would run on a rope then stand on the plate and slide it along the rope from one end to the other. The on-lookers would be wonders struck. The women Shierked out in panic. The on-lookers would show their admiration and eheered them for the fantastic feat and exclaim “Wah bajania, what a feat!”.

That evening Paba went to the greengrocer with the intention to steal some fruits but had to return empty handed because the greengrocer had kept a watchful eye on him. After he returned home he found a banana in his new compass-box and wondered where it had come from.

He felt he was walking on a -‘tightrope’. Janti had the habit of teasing Paba and another of his friend, Surabania. He told Surabania of the incident, Surabania offers him two rupees to flaten Janti’s face into a ‘Papad’. Paba needed the money to buy a ballpen refill and he beat up Janti. Janti’s father was an influential person and he complained to their class teacher. Paba got a severe thrashing the next day.

After the incident Janti and Paba grew apart. Paba confronted Janti and asked him if he had wanted him to be framed for stealing things. Janti pleaded him to forget about it and urged Paba to be friendly with him. After Paba and Janti compro¬mised they because very good friends. They would spend their time together daily at school recess and also play together in the evening after school.

One day, when Janti did not come over to play, Paba grew apprehensive and went to his house. Janti’s mother shouted at him saying, “You ill-begotten fat- so, why doesn’t the devil take you? You want to idle away all day long. You have come to tie my son’s bier (a platform on which dead body is placed before burial).

Paba was extremely saddened and hot tears trickled down his cheeks. Janti’s mother scolded her son for having become friendly with a low-caste boy. Janti hurried to him and dragged him away. He pleaded Paba not to come to his house ever again. Paba couldn’t tolerate his anger. He asked Janti, “Is this your mother or a female viper?”
Janti’s mother was dead. His father had re-married. He explains Paba that if his mother dies, he too will have a cruel step-mother like him. He reveals why he had been secretly placing eatables in Paba’s school bag.

He didn’t want Paba’s mother to die of mal-nourishment. He really wanted Paba not to suffer under a step-mother like himself. Paba felt as if he was walking a tight-rope, one end of which was held by Janti. He closed his eyes in humiliation and shame for having accused Janti trying to frame him as a thief. He had mis-read Janti’s good intentions and was sorry for having thrashed him badly.

The various situations that Paba had to face in his young life is similar to the ‘Tightrope’ act of the street performers. One slip of the foot, they might lose their limbs or even life. The author has effectively portrayed the lives of street-performers, the social conditions and the social discrimination they go through in the short- story.

Tightrope Grammar And Composition

Listening And Note Taking

Exercise 1.

You might have made a list of sounds like the horns of vehicles, ticking of clocks, sounds of someone coughing or sneezing, footsteps etc. These sounds were present even before you started listening to them consciously. However, you only heard them before. Now since you are consciously involved and paying attention, you have listened to them.

Now that we have a simple understanding of hearing and is tensing, let us move on to discuss why listening is important to us, especially as students. In our classrooms, lectures, discussions, etc. are important for us especially from the point of view of examinations where, very often, we are tested based on our memory. Besides understanding the concept, we also need to remember important points with regard to them.

Within such a scenario it becomes important for us to take down notes. We need to write down what is important and needs to be remembered. These notes will be our guiding source during examinations and help us clarify our doubts whenever we need by providing us with permanent records of what we listened to. Hence, taking down notes while listening to a lecture or discussion becomes extremely important.

Note taking
Note taking thus is an important step in effective studying. Studies concerned with note taking have revealed that note taking helps one to listen effectively. It has also been proved that students who study their notes remember one and a half times more after six weeks than students who do not study. The most important finding from these studies is that students who do not take down or study their notes forget approximately 80% of the lectures by the end of two weeks. Having understood the importance of note taking let us also understand that it is a skill that can be acquired and improved through practice.

To develop this skill you need to follow the following steps:
1. Be aware and prepared about the topic you are going to listen to. Read about it beforehand so that you are better prepared with the vocabulary and have a general idea of the topic.

2. Pay close attention to paralanguage the tone, pitch, pauses, stresses, intonation etc. that the speaker uses. They are important pointers to the main and key ideas in any lecture. For instance, very often when a speaker wants to stress a point, he may emphasize it by raising his voice, changing his intonation or using an appropriate gesture.

3. Be alert and look for words like, to sum up, list like first, second, finally etc. Also observe the points the speaker repeats.

4. Be smart while taking down notes. Use abbreviation, pictorial representations and do not waste time in writing down whole sentences.

5. Review your notes the same day so that you can fill in the missing details. After a few days you may miss out on important details.

List of sounds heard:

  • Horns of vehicles
  • Ticking of clocks
  • Coughing sounds
  • Sneezing
  • Footsteps
  • Sub-concious sounds that have been heard before

Exercise 2.

Ask your friend to read out the passage. Complete the notes given below after you listen or as you are listening. Isn’t interesting that each one perceives different data and in different ways. Each of us has our own preferred ways of gathering information. While some are quick to see things, some others are quick to hear things. Some learn better by reading printed text while some learn better by listening to lectures.

Individuals differ from each other in their behavior, attitude and also in the way they react to things. Similarly, they also differ in their learning styles. Depending on the way people learn, they are usually classified into three. They are visual, auditory and kinesthetic learners. Let us look at each of them in slightly greater details. Let us begin with visual learners. As the name suggests, visual learners use their sense of ‘sight’ to learn. They are learners who may think in pictures and learn best form visual displays such as graphs, charts, diagrams, and videos. Now let us look at the second category of learners.

Auditory learners, quite unlike the visual learners, they prefer to learn by listening. They learn best by listening to lectures, discussions, talks, interviews etc. They are usually best at recollecting what they have heard more than what they have seen. If you are able to follow this lecture very well and recollect the information with ease, you are a good auditory learner.

On the other hand, if you are a visual learning, you may have difficulty in listening and understanding this lecture because the lecture is not supported with any visual displays. There may be a few of you who may not benefit from this lecture as much because you have nothing to do.

you may not prefer to sit still for a long time listening to someone; instead you may prefer to be engaged in physical exploration. You may prefer to learn things by doing, touching and feeling. Such learners belong to the third category of kinesthetic learners. They learn best by experimenting and practically doing what they learn.

Now complete the notes given below:

Question 1.
3 different learning styles.
Answer:

  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Kinesthetic

Question 2.
Preferred ways of learning
Answer:

  • Visual learners prefer to learn by sense of ‘sight
  • Auditory learners prefer to learn by listening.
  • Kinesthetic learners prefer to learn by experimenting and practically.

Exercise 3.

You can safely drive your car from one place to another if you follow these steps. First, make sure that all four tyres have enough air in them. Second, settle comfortably into the driver’s seat and fasten your seatbelt snugly across hips, shoulder and chest.

Third, adjust the rear view and side view mirrors to give yourself a clear view of traffic immediately behind you and on both sides, fourth, check over both shoulders before backing out of your parking spot. A successful journey begins with the first step and if.

You begin your drive by following these steps, your journey should end well for you and for everybody else on the road.
Tightrope Summary Notes IMG 1

  • Steps To Drive Safely.
  • Check if all four tyers have enough air.
  • Settle comfortably into the driver’s sat.
  • Fasten seat belt Snugly
  • Adjust rear view and side view mirrors.
  • Check over both shoulder before backing out
  • Journey is safe by following these steps.

English Summary

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